Inuktitut cardinal numbers

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Mancko
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Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Mancko » 2009-11-09, 14:30

Hi,

I'd like to know about the Inuktitut numbers, say how to count from zero to the infinity :D
Si far, I found only one resource on the internet, which is Wikipedia, for numbers from 1 to 10
Apart from that, nothing else.
What is the name of the tens, how do you write down, say 56, 567, or 1,234,567,891?
Is there a special numbering system using another base than 10?
Thanks a lot for your help.

1 ᐊᑕᐅᓯᖅ atausiq
2 ᒪᕐᕉᒃ marruuk
3 ᐱᖓᓱᑦ pingasut
4 ᓯᑕᒪᑦ sitamat
5 ᑕᓪᓕᒪᑦ tallimat
6 ᐊᕐᕕᓂᓕᒃ arvinilik
7 ᒪᕐᕉᖕᓂᒃ ᐊᕐᕕᓂᓕᒃ marruungnik arvinilik
8 ᐱᖓᓱᓂᒃ ᐊᕐᕕᓂᓕᒃ pingasunik arvinilik
9 ᖁᓕᖏᓗᐊᑦ qulingiluat
10 ᖁᓕᑦ qulit

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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Tukkumminnguaq » 2009-11-09, 15:39

56

avatit marruuk qulillu arvinillillu

567


tallimat aggaillu arvinillit aggaillu marruungnik arvinillit OR
tallimanik hannalan arvinillit aggaillu marruungnik arvinilik

1,234,567,891

vilian marruungnik avatit tallimat pingasunik aggaillu pingasunik arvinilik avatit tallimat sitamanik arvinillit aggaillu atausirlu

hannalan is hundred from english
tausat is thousand from english
milian is million from english
vilian is borrowed from english

Mancko wrote:Is there a special numbering system using another base than 10?
Thanks a lot for your help.


Yep they have.

here:
wiki/index.php/Translations:_Numbers_-_Inuktitut

wiki/index.php/Translations:_Numbers_-_Kalaallisut

wiki/index.php/Translations:_Numbers_-_Yup%27ik

wiki/index.php/Translations:_Numbers_-_Unangam_tunuu
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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Mancko » 2009-11-09, 16:12

Thanks a lot :)
By the way, do you know how to say zero?
On the first link you sent me, there's often three different ways to say number.
What's the "official'/most used of them?

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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Tukkumminnguaq » 2009-11-09, 16:28

Mancko wrote:Thanks a lot :)
By the way, do you know how to say zero?
On the first link you sent me, there's often three different ways to say number.
What's the "official'/most used of them?


Ohhh i forgot... we dont have the word "zero" but jiulu (borrowed from english)
or we'd say "there/it is nothing" sutaqanngittuq / hutaqanngittuq

Inuktitut and Kalaallisut(Greenlandic) is most official in Nunavut/Nunavik and Greenland
But i'd say Greenlandic is most official than them.

you can choose inuktitut or kalaallisut either, it is up to you.
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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Mancko » 2009-11-09, 20:57

I try to get some regularity from this numbering system, but I have to admit I'm quite lost.
For example, 25 is 'avatillu tallimallu', and not 'avatit tallimat'.

Could you tell me the numbers from 21 to 29? (hoping that the same rule is used from 21 to 99)

Another irregularity is 400, which is 'avatit avatit' where I expected 'sitamat avatit tallimat'.

Some other numbers would help too, namely 101, 110 and 1,001.

Also, from that data Inuktitut numbers, we have different sets of rules, which I assume to be different dialects.
15 can be 'itikkanuuqtut tallimanik' or 'qulillu tallimallu' (with a declension).
So 25 (avatillu tallimallu) matches the second form, whereas 'inuinnaq tallimat' matches 20 as 'inuinnaq', which makes a regular twenties series (ten + unit).

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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Tukkumminnguaq » 2009-11-12, 20:38

Hi, sorry about late replied that i was errand.

Mancko wrote:I try to get some regularity from this numbering system, but I have to admit I'm quite lost.
For example, 25 is 'avatillu tallimallu', and not 'avatit tallimat'.

Could you tell me the numbers from 21 to 29? (hoping that the same rule is used from 21 to 99)


avatillu atausirlu
avatillu marruuglu (malruuglu)
avatillu pingasullu
avatillu sitamallu
avatillu tallimallu
avatillu arvinillillu
avatillu pingasunik arvinillillu
avatillu marruungnik arvinillillu
avatillu qulingiluarlu (quliqanngituinnaqtullu)

the suffixes -llu means "and", avatillu tallimallu (twenty-and five-and)

of course they r same but depends on suffixes -nik, or -tut etc

if you see the suffixes -nik are instrumental/modifies is would be "with" or object
and -tut is third plural pronouns "they are"

Another irregularity is 400, which is 'avatit avatit' where I expected 'sitamat avatit tallimat'.

Some other numbers would help too, namely 101, 110 and 1,001.


avatit avatit (twenty (x) twenty = 400) in East Inuktitut dialects
and "sitamat qulit aggait" (four [x] ten [x] ten) in Aivilik/Kivalliq dialects

101 = avatit tallimat atausirlu (twenty [x] five and one)
110 = avatit tallimat qulillu ( 20 [x] five and ten)
1,001 = avatit tallimat quliiqtaq&ugit atausirlu (twenty [x] five [x] 10-times and one)
qulit aggait quliiqtaq&ugit atausirlu (ten [x] 10 [x] 10-times and one)


Also, from that data Inuktitut numbers, we have different sets of rules, which I assume to be different dialects.
15 can be 'itikkanuuqtut tallimanik' or 'qulillu tallimallu' (with a declension).
So 25 (avatillu tallimallu) matches the second form, whereas 'inuinnaq tallimat' matches 20 as 'inuinnaq', which makes a regular twenties series (ten + unit).


itikkanuuqtut tallimanik (eleven-they five-instrumental [They are eleven with five] in South Baffin dialects,

qulillu tallimallu is Kivalliq, Aivilik, North Baffin dialects.

avatillu tallimallu is Kivalliq, Aivilik, North baffin dialects and
Inuinnaq tallimat is Inuinnaqtun/Inuvialuktun and some inuit dialects.

actually Inuit has so many dialects but there 4 dialects Inupiaq, West Inuit and East Inuit and Greenlandic. and at least 25-30 subdialects. lol
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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Mancko » 2009-11-12, 21:11

Hi,
Thanks a lot for your reply. I'm going to read it thoroughly tomorrow, as it's quite late here (in France).
I did not know there were so many differences between the dialects, even on the numbers level (which I thought were usually consistent between dialects (as you can see, apart from the fact that I like parenthesis, I may not really grasp the language vs. dialect differences)).
So, when we say Inuktitut, without referring to any dialect, does it mean there is a globally recognised language that is understood between the different communities, even though they're using a different dialect, say a mutually understandable language?
If not the case, which dialect is the most used (by number of speakers)?
I see that Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami publishes its reports in at least four languages/dialects (Inuinnaqtun, Inuktitut, Inuttitut and Inuvialuktun). Eastern Inuktitut seems to be the most used, but I may be wrong, does it mean that by saying Inuktitut, we're implicitely talking about Eastern Inuktitut?
Ok, enough for the machinegun questioning, and thanks for help :)

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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Mancko » 2009-11-15, 16:51

I worked a bit with the Yup’ik numbering rules, so I have a better understanding of the construction of the numbers in base 20 and their system is quite close to the Inuktitut one, plus both languages are related, or so it seems.
I think the next step will be to get all the data for Eastern Inuktitut only and then I should be able to understand the numbers it that language too.

I have some questions about Yup’ik suffixes and their meaning though, I don't know if you can help:
I assume -at would mean something like "multiplied by", as yuinaat pingayun (60) is yuinaq (20) multiplied by pingayun (3).
So, what about -ak, differentiating between yuinaq (20) and yuinaak malruk (40=20*2)?

The same occurs with the thousands suffixes (-aq, -ak, -at)
1,000 = tiissitsaaq
2,000 = malruk tiissitsaak
10,000 = qulen tiissitsaat

What does -legen suffix means?
Say, what's the difference between pingayun (3) and pingayunlegen (8)?

Thanks a lot for any help.

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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Tukkumminnguaq » 2009-11-21, 7:07

Mancko wrote:I worked a bit with the Yup’ik numbering rules, so I have a better understanding of the construction of the numbers in base 20 and their system is quite close to the Inuktitut one, plus both languages are related, or so it seems.
I think the next step will be to get all the data for Eastern Inuktitut only and then I should be able to understand the numbers it that language too.


Yupik and Inuit are related so it is call Eskimo (Yupik/Inuit) and they closely related Aleut language, now they are "Eskimo-Aleut languages"
West Inuit is more like Yupik numbers for example

"twenty" in
Siberian Yupik | Yupik | Iñupiaq | West Inuit
yugenaq (yuinaq) | yuinaq | iñuiññaq | inuinnaq ("completing human beings i.e both hands and feet)

East Inuit dont use that word 'inuinnaq' anymore but they'd say "avatit" is means "limbs"
Greenlandic using "tiivii" from Danish tyve but Old Greenlandic used "inuk naavdlugu" means "completing human being"

I have some questions about Yup’ik suffixes and their meaning though, I don't know if you can help:
I assume -at would mean something like "multiplied by", as yuinaat pingayun (60) is yuinaq (20) multiplied by pingayun (3).
So, what about -ak, differentiating between yuinaq (20) and yuinaak malruk (40=20*2)?

The same occurs with the thousands suffixes (-aq, -ak, -at)
1,000 = tiissitsaaq
2,000 = malruk tiissitsaak
10,000 = qulen tiissitsaat

What does -legen suffix means?
Say, what's the difference between pingayun (3) and pingayunlegen (8)?

Thanks a lot for any help.


the Inuit and Yupik's ending -k are the dual marker and -t are the plural marker

yuinaak malruk (twenty-dual [x] two equal 40)
yuinaat pingayun (twenty-plural [x] three equal 60)


tiissitsaaq is loaned from Russian's word

-legen means 'across over'

malrunlegen (the one that follows across over)
pingayunlegen (the addendum across over)

etc

the Inuit and Yupik's numbers are based on the human body.

The Eskimo dialects numeration system can thus be summarized as follows:

1. 'the adherence; what is indivisible; attachment; appendage' (from ata- 'to cling/adhere; to become attached/together/united, the suffixe -usiq/-uciq 'manner/custom/habit of; usual way of doing something')

*ataRuciR (Proto-Eskimo)
ateresex (Sirenik)
ataaziq (Siberian Yupik)
ataasiq (Naukan Yupik)
atuusiq / allriluq (Alutiiq Sugpiaq)
ataucir (Nunivak Cup'ik)
atauciq (Yup'ik)
atausriq (Malimiutun)
atausiq (King Island Inupiaq, North Slope Inupiaq, Siglitun, Aivilik, N/S Baffin, Nunavik)
atausiK / atautsiK (Labrador Inuttut)
atauhiq (Uummarmiutun Inupiaq, Inuinnaqtun, Natsilingmiutut, Kivalliq and North Greenlandic)
atauheq (North Greenlandic)
atautchiq (Old Siglitun *Tchiglitun)
ataaseq (West Greenlandic)
alaaseq (East Greenlandic) *suutteq 'first'

2. ‘the following unit; one that follows’ (malik- to follows/accompany, the suffixes -ruq 'spot; a unit of, a section or part of ', -k is the dual)

*malRug (Proto-Eskimo)
malrug (Sirenik)
maalghuk (Siberian/Naukan Yupik)
malluk / mal'uk (Alutiiq Sugpiaq)
malzrug (Nunivak Cup'ik)
maleruk (Old Siglitun)
malruk (Yup'ik, North Slope Inupiaq, Siglitun, Inuinnaqtun, Natsilingmiut and Kivalliq)
marluuk (King Island Inupiaq)
mardluk (North Greenlandic)
marluk (West Greenlandic)
marlik (South Greenlandic)
martit (East Greenlandic) *suuttip tuttia 'next to first'
marruuk (Aivilingmiutut, Baffin and Nunavik)
magguuk (Labrador Inuttut)

alraaq (west dialects)

'the other one'
aippaak (Old Siglitun)
aappaa (East Greelandic)

3. ‘addendum’

*pingayut (Proto-Eskimo)
pingeyug (Sirenik)
pingayut (Siberian/Naukan Yupik)
pingaun (Alutiiq Sugpiaq)
pingayun (Yup'ik)
piñgasrut (Malimiutun)
pingasut (King Island Inupiaq, Inupiaq, Siglitun, Aivilingmiut, Baffin, Nunavik, Labrador, West Greenlandic)
pingatchut (Old Siglitun)
pingayuat (some Kivalliq)
pingahut (Uummarmiutun, Inuinnaqtun, Natsilingmiutut, Kivalliq and Thule North Greenlandic)
pingasit (South Greenlandic / East Greenlandic)
pingaivaajat (East Greenlandic)

ilaak (Old Siglitun) '3rd singular he/she/it'

4. probably 'spread out (the arm/wings)'

*cetamat (Proto-Eskimo)
sitemiy (Sirenik)
staamat (Siberian Yupik)
staaman (Alutiiq Sugpiaq)
cetaman (Yup'ik, Nunivak Cup'ik)
sisamat (North Slope Inupiaq, East Baffin, West Greenlandic)
tchitamat (Old Siglitun)
hihamat (Natsilingmiutut and Thule North Greenlandic)
hitamat (Uummarmiutun, Inuinnaqtun and Kivalliq)
tisamat (North Baffin)
sitamat (Naukan Yupik, King Island Inupiaq, Siglitun, Aivilingmiutut, South Baffin, Nunavik, Labrador)
siamat / siamaajat (East Greenlandic)

5. ‘an arm is completed; one arm’ (a derivative from *taɫi- 'arm, flipper'.)

*taɫɫimat (*tavɫimat) (Proto-Eskimo)
tasímengíy (Sirenik)
talliman (Alutiiq, Cup'ik, Yup'ik)
tallimat (Siberian/Naukan Yupik, Rest of the Inuit dialects)
tadlimat (North Greenlandic)
tattimat / tattimaajat (East Greenlandic)

Notes:
King Island Inupiaq/Greenlandic marlu(u)k are metathesis from malruk
East Inuktitut dialects marruuk/ magguuk are assimilate from malruk
South/East Greenlandic marlik / martit / pingasit and Sirenik are vowel harmony 'u' becomes 'i'
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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Mancko » 2009-11-21, 18:09

Thank you, that's awesome!
I've added as much information as possible about Yup'ik counting on my how to count in Yup’ik page.
Still have to gather data about all the other Eskimo-Aleut languages you're listing there.

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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Tukkumminnguaq » 2009-11-30, 13:24

Mancko wrote:Thank you, that's awesome!
I've added as much information as possible about Yup'ik counting on my how to count in Yup’ik page.
Still have to gather data about all the other Eskimo-Aleut languages you're listing there.


Oh really? it is awesome! do you own did them urself?

by the way

arvinlegen, means cross over, as you need to change hand to go on counting. At eleven, they start counting with the toes of their right foot (the word for ten, qula, means above). The pre-contact word for eleven was athaktok, which means it goes down, showing thus that the counting is now performed with the toes, a meaning lost with the modern eleven word, as qula atauciq means 10 plus 1. The word for nine, qulmgunritaraan, means not quite ten, and nineteen, yuinaunritaraan, means not quite twenty. The word for twenty, yuinaq, derives from yuk, the whole person, as all fingers and toes are now used.


atraqtut is Alutiiq and some Yupik dialects means
'moving down there (to the feet)', ''it goes down' (from the hands to the feet)'

but i'll post more about Eskimo-Aleut dialects in their numbers. sorry about that i been busy and i'll go online more often when im free/space time. and you can ask me for question anytime
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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Mancko » 2009-11-30, 13:56

I based most of that content on the article I linked on the page, namely Culturally negociated schooling: toward a Yup’ik mathematics, by Jerry Lipka.
That plus your guidance helped me a lot to understand Yup’ik and other related languages numbers.

You say that I should replace athaktok by atraqtut, which is Alutiiq and not Yup’ik?
What was the word in Yup’ik then?

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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Tukkumminnguaq » 2009-11-30, 16:32

Mancko wrote:I based most of that content on the article I linked on the page, namely Culturally negociated schooling: toward a Yup’ik mathematics, by Jerry Lipka.
That plus your guidance helped me a lot to understand Yup’ik and other related languages numbers.

You say that I should replace athaktok by atraqtut, which is Alutiiq and not Yup’ik?
What was the word in Yup’ik then?


qula atauciq

here numbers:

6. six ‘there is a passage; they have a passage’ or 'crossing over to the edge of the other hand'

The first part of the numerals 'six', 'eleven', 'sixteen' has no connections with *aʁva 'palm of the hand (esp. without the little finger or thumb)' despite CED. It is a clear derivative from this root, with the meaning 'transfer (to another group of numerals)'.

*aRvineleg (Proto-Eskimo)
inglex (Sirenik)
aghvinglek (Siberian Yupik)
aghvinelek (Naukan Yupik)
arwinlgen (Alutiiq Sugpiaq)
arwinleg (Nunivak Cup'ik)
arving(e)legen (Yup'ik)
arvingillit / arvinilik (King Island Inupiaq)
arviniluerit (Old Siglitun)
arvinilik / arviniq (Siglitun, Inuinnaqtun, Natsilik, Kivalliq)
[atauhiq] arvinrat / arvingat (Natsilingmiutut, Kivalliq)
arvinillit (Kivalliq)
arviniqtut (Aivilingmiutut)
arviniliit (North Baffin)
arvinilik [atausirmik] (Some Inuktitut)
aqpinilik (Rigolet Inuttut)
arfinidlit (North Greenlandic)
arfinillit (West/South Greenlandic)
arpiittit / arpiaajat (East Greenlandic)

ikiakkirit (King Island Inupiaq?)
itchaksrat (Inupiaq)

igluaneq (North Greenlandic)

‘they are addendum (three) once again’
pingasuujuqtut (South Baffin, Nunavik)
pingasuujuttut (Labrador)

7. ‘there is a passage with the following units (two)’,

*malRughnengaRvinelegh (Proto-Eskimo)
malrughningingli-kilrix (Sirenik)
maalghaghvinlek (Siberian Yupik)
maalghugnengaghvinelek (Naukan Yupik)
malluugin / mal'uugin (Alutiiq Sugpiaq)
malzrunleg (Nunivak Cup'ik)
malrung(e)legen (Yup'ik)
malerungnik arviniluerit, arviniluerit aippaak, arvinillit maleruk (Old Siglitun)
malrungnik arvinilik (Siglitun)
malruk arvingat (Natsilingmiutut)
alrak arvingat (some Kivalliq)
malruungniarvinilik (Kivalliq)
marruungniarvinilik (Aivilingmiutut)
arviniliit marruungnik (North Baffin)
arvinilik marruungnik (Some Inuktitut)
arfineq mardluk (North Greenlandic)
arfineqmarluk (West Greenlandic)
arfineqmarlik (South Greenlandic)
arpineq martut / arpineq aappaa (East Greenlandic)

marluuk naavlugit (King Island Inupiaq) 'completing the following units (2)'

'the arm is completed (5) with following units (2)'
tallimat malruk (Inupiaq)
tallimat malrungnik (Siglitun)

igluaneq mardluk (North Greenlandic)

'they are not quite four once again/repeated’
sitamaujunngigaqtut (South Baffin, Nunavik)
sitamaujunngigattut (Labrador)

8. ‘there is a passage with addendum (3)’

*pingayunengaRvinelegh (Proto-Eskimo)
pingiyughningingli-kilrix (Sirenik)
pingayunenginglulek (Siberian Yupik)
pingayunengaghvinelek (Naukan YupiK)
inglulgen / inmolin (Alutiiq Sugpiaq)
pingayunleg (Nunivak Cup'ik)
pingayung(e)legen (Yup'ik)
pingatchunik arviniluerit, arviniluerit ilaak (Old Siglitun)
pingasunik arvinilik (Siglitun)
pingahunik arvingat (Natsilingmiutut)
pingahuniarvinillit / pingayuanik arvingat (Kivalliq)
pingasuniarvinillit (Aivilingmiutut)
arviniliit pingasunik (North Baffin)
arvinilik pingasunik (Some Inuktitut)
arfineq pingahut (North Greenlandic)
arfineqpingasut (West Greenlandic)
arfineqpingasit (South Greenlandic)
arpiniq pingaivaajat/pingasit (East Greenlandi)

pingasut naavlugit (King Island Inupiaq?)

'the arm is completed with addendum (3)'
tallimat piñgasrut (Malimiutun)
tallimat pingasut (Inupiaq)
tallimat pingasunik (Siglitun)

qitiq&immat 'middle finger' (West Hudson Bay)

igluaneq pingahut (North Greenlandic)

‘they are spread out (4) once again/repeated’
sitamaujuqtut (South Baffin, Nunavik)
sitamaujuttut (Labrador)

9. ‘they are not quite the upper part (10)’

*qulengnguRutengit (Proto-Eskimo)
ngingli (Sirenik)
qulngughutngilnguq (Naukan Yupik)
qulnguyan (Alutiiq Sugpiaq)
qulzngunrita'ar (Nunivak Cup'ik)
qulngunritaraan / qulngunrita'ar (Yup'ik)
qulngurutailnguut (Norton Sound)
qulinguuteeleet / qulinguutailat / qulingurailaq (King Island Inupiaq)
qulingnguġutailat (Inupiaq)
qulingiluat (Siglitun, Inuinnaqtun, Natsilingmiutut, North/West Greenlandic)
qulingiluad (North Greenlandic)
qulaaluat (West/South Greenlandic)
qutingituat / qutingituaajat (East Greenlandic)
qulingiluaqtut (Kivalliq, Aivilik)
quliqanngituinnaqtut / quliqanngittuinnait (North Baffin)
quliunngigaqtut (South Baffin, Nunavik)
Kuliunngigattut (Labrador)

igluaneq hihamat (North Greenlandic)

‘there is a passage with spread out (4)’
staamanenginglulek (Siberian Yupik)
arvinilik sitamanik (Unknown, Inuktitut?)
hihamanik arvingat (Natsilingmiutut)
hitamanik arvingat (some Kivalliq)
arfineqsisamat (South Greenlandic)

tallimaruunngijatuq (GWR) 'there is not quite one arm completed (5)'

10. 'the upper [part] half (of the body)'

*quleng / *qulet (Proto-Eskimo)
kula (Siberian Yupik)
qulmeng (Naukan Yupik)
qulen (Alutiiq Sugpiaq)
qula (Naukan Yupik, Cup'ik, Yup'ik)
qulit (all inuit dialects)
Kulit (Labrador)
qutit / qututiaatat (East Greenlandic)

algait naamayut (Inuinnaqtun) 'the hands are completed'

iqitqukka 'my (dual) little fingers' (West Hudson Bay)

‘they are arm completed (5) once again/repeated’
tasixta / tasixma (Sirenik)
tallimauyuiqtut (some Kivalliq)
tallimaujuqtut (Nunavik)
tallimaujuttut (Labrador)

11. 'moving down there (to the feet)', ''it goes down' (from the hands to the feet)'
*atRanelet-k / *atQaneR (Proto-Eskimo)
atghanelek (Naukan Yupik)
atrarngalek (Old Alutiiq)
atqanilik (King Island Inupiaq)
atqanrat / atqaniq (Natsilingmiutut, Kivalliq)
atqangaq (Qamani'tuarmiut)
aqqanillit (West Greenlandic)
aqqanittit (East Greenlandic)

'the upper part is the adherence (1)'
qulam ataasiq sipnagha (Siberian Yupik)
qula allrilumek atrarngaluni / ciplluku (Alutiiq Sugpiaq)
qula-ataucir (Cup'ik)
qula atauciq (Yup'ik)
qulit atausirmik (King Island Inupiaq)
qulit atausiq (Inupiaq)

itiangnerat, atautchi-itiangniluerit (Old Siglitun)

qulit arvingmat (Natsilingmiutut) 'the upper part is put aside'

qulillu atauhirlu (Kivalliq)
qulillu atausirlu (Aivilingmiutut, North Baffin)

itikkanuuqtut [atausirmik] ‘they go to the feet’ (Old South Baffin)
ihikkaneq 'on the feet' (North Greenlandic)

so goes on...
[flag]en-ca[/flag][flag]sgn[/flag][flag]iu[/flag][flag]kl[/flag][flag]ale[/flag]
[flag]qu[/flag][flag]tr[/flag][flag]yrk[/flag][flag]evn[/flag][flag]ckt[/flag][flag]itl[/flag]

[̲̅̅N̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅b̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅d̲̅][̲̅̅y̲̅] [̲̅̅K̲̅][̲̅̅n̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅w̲̅][̲̅̅s̲̅][̲̅̅.̲̅] [̲̅̅L̲̅][̲̅̅i̲̅][̲̅̅f̲̅][̲̅̅e̲̅] [̲̅̅A̲̅][̲̅̅s̲̅] [̲̅̅T̲̅][̲̅̅h̲̅][̲̅̅e̲̅][̲̅̅y̲̅] [̲̅̅K̲̅][̲̅̅n̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅w̲̅] [̲̅̅I̲̅][̲̅̅t̲̅][̲̅̅.̲̅]

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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Mancko » 2009-11-30, 19:21

Sorry, I meant what was the precontact word if not athaktok?

I'm impressed with all the distinct languages so close to each other you list there. I'm already mixed up between Portuguese and Spanish myself.
Do you read/speak/understand orally many of them?

Keep up the good work, I'm looking forward for the rest of it :yep:

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Tukkumminnguaq
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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Tukkumminnguaq » 2009-12-01, 1:20

Mancko wrote:Sorry, I meant what was the precontact word if not athaktok?

I'm impressed with all the distinct languages so close to each other you list there. I'm already mixed up between Portuguese and Spanish myself.
Do you read/speak/understand orally many of them?

Keep up the good work, I'm looking forward for the rest of it :yep:


athaktok is misspelled and old writing in 1970s something.

Yes i understand all of them, they are different spelling but same word meaning.
[flag]en-ca[/flag][flag]sgn[/flag][flag]iu[/flag][flag]kl[/flag][flag]ale[/flag]
[flag]qu[/flag][flag]tr[/flag][flag]yrk[/flag][flag]evn[/flag][flag]ckt[/flag][flag]itl[/flag]

[̲̅̅N̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅b̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅d̲̅][̲̅̅y̲̅] [̲̅̅K̲̅][̲̅̅n̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅w̲̅][̲̅̅s̲̅][̲̅̅.̲̅] [̲̅̅L̲̅][̲̅̅i̲̅][̲̅̅f̲̅][̲̅̅e̲̅] [̲̅̅A̲̅][̲̅̅s̲̅] [̲̅̅T̲̅][̲̅̅h̲̅][̲̅̅e̲̅][̲̅̅y̲̅] [̲̅̅K̲̅][̲̅̅n̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅w̲̅] [̲̅̅I̲̅][̲̅̅t̲̅][̲̅̅.̲̅]

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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby Mancko » 2009-12-01, 11:29

Here's a tree map gathered from Wikipedia to try to untangle all those languages and dialects.
The three-letter codes after some language names are ISO 639-3 when available.

Well, that's clearly a work in progress, and I'm no linguist (and even linguists seem to have some disputes while classifying them), so nothing's written in rock here.

Some questions are still open:
- Inuktitut dialects/divisions cover a lot of Inuvialuktun's which is more detailed as dialects/subdialects division on Wikipedi, so they should be merged
- Inupiatun: two ISO codes are defined, but I can't tell which is which in the Inupiaq tree: esk (Northwest Alaska Inupiat) and esi (Inupiat, North Alaskan Inuktitut, North Alaskan Inupiat)
- where does Kivalliq stands?
- you distinguish between Rigolet Inuttut and Labrador where they are set under the same name (Nunatsiavut): are they dialects of it?

Sirenik (ysr) (extinct)

Inuktitut (iku)
    - Kangiryuarmiutun
    - Siglitun
    - Uummarmiutun
    - Inuinnaqtun
    - Natsilingmiutut
    - Kivallirmiutut
    - Aivilingmiutut
    - North Baffin (Qikiqtaaluk uannangani)
    - South Baffin (Qikiqtaaluk nigiani)
    - Nunavimmiutitut (Nunavik dialect, relatively close to the South Baffin dialect)
    - Nunatsiavut (Nunatsiavummiutut, Labradorimiutut, Inuttut)

Inuvialuktun (ikt)
    - Siglitun
    - Inuinnaqtun (ikt)
      - Kangiryuarmiutun (essentially identical to the Inuinnaqtun spoken in the bordering part of Nunavut)
      - Coppermine
      - Bathurst
      - Cambridge
    - Natsilingmiutut
      - Natsilik
      - Arviligjuaq
      - Utkuhikhalik
    - Uummarmiutun (which is also the Inupiatun dialect spoken in Alaska, dialect of Iñupiaq)

Inupiaq (Iñupiaq, Inupiatun) (ipk)
    - Uummarmiutun
    - Seward Peninsula Inupiaq
      - Bering Strait
        - Diomede
        - Wales
        - King Island
      - Qawiaraq
        - Teller
        - Fish River
    - Northern Alaskan Iñupiaq
      - Malimiutun
        - Kobuk
        - Kotzebue
      - North Slope
        - Common North Slope
        - Point Barrow
        - Anaktuvuk Pass
        - Uummarmiutun (which is also considered as a dialect of Inuvialuktun)

Yupik (ypk)
    - Alutiiq (Sugpiaq, Pacific Gulf Yupik) (ems)
      - Koniag Alutiiq
      - Chugach Alutiiq
    - Yup'ik (Central Alaskan Yup'ik) (esu)
      - General Central Yup’ik
      - Norton Sound
      - Nunivak Cup'ik
      - Egegik,
      - Hooper Bay-Chevak
    - Siberian Yupik (Central Siberian Yupik, Bering Strait Yupik, Yuit, Yoit) (ess)
    - Naukan (ynk) (70 speakers)

Greenlandic (Kalaallisut) (kal)
    - Western Greenlandic (Kalaallisut) (kal)
    - Inuktun (Avanersuarmiutut)
    - Eastern Greenlandic (Tunumiit oraasiat)
    - Upernavik dialect

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Re: Inuktitut cardinal numbers

Postby kineocarr » 2009-12-06, 14:18

Returning to numbers for a moment, I've been wondering something: how often are the Inuktitut words for numbers actually used, as opposed to the English loanwords? I sometimes watch episodes of the Igalaaq news broadcast from the CBC website for an attempt at listening practice, and it sounds like they use English numbers with some frequency, particularly when talking about percentages, years, etc., and when giving the phone numbers for viewer opinions. Granted, I only understand a tiny bit of what's being said, so naturally my ears are picking out the familiar sounds, but is this typical?


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