Do your name have any meaning?

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Shinn
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Postby Shinn » 2007-02-25, 10:26

My name is Shoma which is Vedic in origin and has about 50 million meanings as most Sanskrit words do. But mostly it's related to the Indo-Aryan god of the moon Soma and most of the meanings have something or the other to do with the moon.

I recently found out that Shoma is a masculine name in Japan and apparently means "champion". I also came across a Russian man with the same name as me. Which rather puts me in a fix eh.
My name is not very common and despite having only 2 damn syllables is always mispelled, mutilated and transmuted into something else. =_='

My surname is Patnaik but I won't go into details there since Indian surnames always have a truckload of history and meanings behind them. In any case, its pretty uncommon too and rarely spelled correctly. I once went crazy trying to find my name on a school list until I realized that they had misspelled it as "Zoma Tapania" :shock:

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kalemiye
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Postby kalemiye » 2007-02-25, 14:30

mi real name is Renata, which is latin and it means "Born once again" ('Renacida' in spanish). I was given that name because of the meaning, but i don't like the way it sounds though.
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Æren
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Postby Æren » 2007-03-01, 20:44

Both my real and my nick names have their meanings ^_^
Ivan comes from Ancient Greek Ιωάννης which came from ancient Hebrew Jochanan which I've heard it means "God is love" :D
About Æren: It came to my mind suddenly :P Later I found in Tolkien's Sindarin the root "ar(a)-" meaning "high, tall, magnificent", and a word made from it "aran"- "king"; so, I assume that I've just subconsciously uplifted the vowels :)

hiro
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meaning of my name

Postby hiro » 2007-03-04, 8:29

My real first name is Midori, and it means "green" (color).
I was born in late at the end of April. My parents saw beautiful green leaves outside. Then they named me Midori. I have a sister and she and I are twins. My sister's name is "Yoko", and "yo (葉)" means leaf.
I like this story and my name. :)

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kalemiye
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Re: meaning of my name

Postby kalemiye » 2007-03-04, 9:09

hiro wrote:My real first name is Midori, and it means "green" (color).
I was born in late at the end of April. My parents saw beautiful green leaves outside. Then they named me Midori. I have a sister and she and I are twins. My sister's name is "Yoko", and "yo (葉)" means leaf.
I like this story and my name. :)


wow, very beautiful story!
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skoll
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Postby skoll » 2007-03-04, 9:54

Lauura wrote: I don't think there are names that mean things like "he who is good for nothing" or "the one we're all fed up with", don't you think? :silly:
I know that in italy, that's in the region Emilia, a person has a name meaning "I didn't want you [to be born]" = "Antavleva" in regional dialect


Nero wrote:My name is Thomas, and my parents only picked it because it didn't have a female form (Alex -> Alexandra, Carl -> Carla, Thomas -> ?)
having a female form can be annoying for male children here . Most of our names have both forms when taken from male names, but obviously it doesn't often happen the opposite [I never heard Margherito o Roso for instance, but honestly, they look like very ugly to me.]

When you begin to attend school, children use short forms, especially in case of very common names.Now since most of those names share female and male meaning, the short form can create confusion.

There's a tendency to use the form Franci from Francesco, which is the original male name for both [female Francesca], so when you share your name with someone else, you often jump up in the air thinking they're calling you when it's someone else, but you see they're calling often a little girl :? They also can play jokes with your name changing the final -o into -a. With names like Raul or Alan this can't happen. Pretty much no one is gonna bother with that.
Also you can be someone sharing the name Francesco o Francesca with someone else until you you complete the high school,and so on in the place where you work since is the most common name of Italy [Not to mention Saint Francis is the patron of Italy], so , again, you can happen to think they're calling you when it's mostly always someone else.

There's a certain tendency to use Franci o similar spellings by females, while guys have seemed to begin to use Fran [like I do] to avoid gender misunderstanding, following the Spanish trend [Fran seems to be exclusively used by guys in Spain, that 's great, IMO] in the place of Franco [that can also be an original ethnical name, not a short form like in this case] Franco is not anyway a short form that the majority of the guys seems to like much here .





Francy wrote:My full name, Francesca, means "free of spirit and state" It was the name the Latin gave to the people living in France at that time (the celts) when they weren't still under the Latin dominion... I like it very much!!!!
Franks were a germanic tribe which settled in France but they were not Celts. France bears a name which could be fit for the Dutch, I think, since the dutch are descendents from the Franks who installed in the zones nowadays inhabitated by Flemish and Dutch .The name France was given for all the territory subjected to the Franks Empire including the modern France,and then Netherlands, Belgium, Germany,Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia, Northern Italy and part of Spain but the core of the Franks was in the Netherlands-Belgium, as linguistic scholars have studied that dutch came from Lower-Franconian

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franks
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Frankish_language

"The meaning of "free" (English frank, frankly, franklin) arose because, after the conquest of Gaul, only Franks had the status of freemen"


Then, after it was clear that this Empire has 2 big ethnical groups based on the language family they spoke -Latin and Germanic languages- , the part including germanic populations was called Germania and the name France remained mostly to what turned to be French [excluding Italy]Ironically Germania was used by Latins and Francia came from Germanic.



http://da.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankerne:


Det latinske navn francus (fletal: franci) betyder "fri" på de germanske sprog. Man finder oprindelsen til ordet frank i et andet ord, frekkr (= "hårdfør", "tapper"), som også er germansk.

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Steisi
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Postby Steisi » 2007-03-04, 10:49

skoll wrote:
Lauura wrote: I don't think there are names that mean things like "he who is good for nothing" or "the one we're all fed up with", don't you think? :silly:
I know that in italy, that's in the region Emilia, a person has a name meaning "I didn't want you [to be born]" = "Antavleva" in regional dialect


Actually, in Malaysia, I think, the government had to pass a law to stop malaysians calling their children things like "Hitler" and "smelly dog". They think that calling their children such unattractive names wards off evil spirits :
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/5229060.stm
Native: English
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Actively learning: Hebrew
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En usko humalaan.

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Gormur
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Re:

Postby Gormur » 2020-03-24, 13:57

Gormur wrote:
The boy's name Lance is of French origin. From Lanzo (Old German) "land". Nickname of Lancelot. Not related to the medieval jousting weapon. Lantz is a Yiddish name meaning "lancet." Cyclist Lance Armstrong; singer Lance Bass.

Lance has 3 variant forms: Lantz, Lanzo and Launce.



I hate my name, no one calls me by it if they know me. I wish I knew the meaning of my last name.


My middle name: Jesse /ˈdʒɛsi/,[1] or Yishai (Hebrew: יִשַׁי – Yišay,[a] in pausa יִשָׁי – Yišāy, meaning "King" or "God exists" or "God's gift"; Syriac: ܐܝܫܝ‎ – Eshai; Greek: Ἰεσσαί – Iessaí; Latin: Isai, Jesse) is a figure described in the Bible as the father of David, who became the king of the Israelites. His son David is sometimes called simply "Son of Jesse" (Ben Yishai). The role as both father of King David and ancestor of Christ has been used in various depictions in art, e.g. as the Tree of Jesse or in hymns like "Lo, how a rose e'er blooming."

I'm still trying to figure out my last name, so maybe next time. I'll include it :para: :hmm:
Eigi gegnir þat at segja at bók nøkkur er hreinferðug eðr ønnur spelluð því at vandliga ok dáliga eru bœkr ritnar ok annat kunnum vér eigi um þœr at dœma


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