Livonian

hajoseszter
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Real Name: Eszter Hajós
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Location: Hungary
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Re: Livonian

Postby hajoseszter » 2020-11-02, 23:30

Wow, thank you for your amazing help!
I'm back again with a song, I'm not sure if this was before in the forum or not. There's also lyrics in the description, but could you please check it? And also the translation. And word by word, if possible...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAekyLCSmkM

Could you also recommend me any folk song about/related to nature? In any small languages you know.

Linguaphile
Posts: 3340
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Livonian

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-11-03, 1:26

hajoseszter wrote:Wow, thank you for your amazing help!
I'm back again with a song, I'm not sure if this was before in the forum or not. There's also lyrics in the description, but could you please check it? And also the translation. And word by word, if possible...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAekyLCSmkM


sadā = come down (this is the verb used for rain and snow, so "pour" is also a possible translation here)
vīmõ = rain
ī'd stuņḑ = for one hour
līgõ, līgõ = this is a refrain often used in folksongs

alā = don't
sadā = come down
amā pǟva = all day, whole day
(līgõ, līgõ)

sadā = come down
vīmõ = rain
ī'd pǟva = for one day
(līgõ, līgõ)

alā = don't
sadā = come down
amā nädīļ = all week, whole week
(līgõ, līgõ)

sadā = come down
vīmõ = rain
ī'd nädīļ = for one week
(līgõ, līgõ)

alā = don't
sadā = come down
amā sõ'v = all summer, whole summer
(līgõ, līgõ)

sadā = come down
vīmõ = rain
ī'd stuņḑ = for one hour
(līgõ, līgõ)

alā = don't
sadā = come down
amā pǟva = all day, whole day
(līgõ, līgõ)


hajoseszter wrote:Could you also recommend me any folk song about/related to nature? In any small languages you know.

These are a few in "small languages" for which the translation is already posted:
Gula gula (Listen listen) (bottom of the post), about listening to nature, in Northern Saami
Julevädno (Lule River), about the river, in Lule Saami
Pääsköilintu, päivöilintu (Swallow, Bird of the Sun), a creation story based on nature, in Izhorian
Lendi linduine (A Bird Flew), a creation story based on nature, in Veps
Abuta, Jumal (Help, God) about drought, in Veps

awrui
Posts: 111
Joined: 2019-05-09, 9:55

Re: Livonian

Postby awrui » 2020-11-03, 3:37

Linguaphile wrote:
hajoseszter wrote:Could you also recommend me any folk song about/related to nature? In any small languages you know.

These are a few in "small languages" for which the translation is already posted:
Gula gula (Listen listen) (bottom of the post), about listening to nature, in Northern Saami
Julevädno (Lule River), about the river, in Lule Saami
Pääsköilintu, päivöilintu (Swallow, Bird of the Sun), a creation story based on nature, in Izhorian
Lendi linduine (A Bird Flew), a creation story based on nature, in Veps
Abuta, Jumal (Help, God) about drought, in Veps

Here a few Saami ones, most in North Saami.
Birkoj (Bjørgefjell) A mountain South Saami
Maze (Masi) A village
Duna Duna about a reindeer I think? Skolt Saami
These are folk songs I know. But there are quite a few pop songs!
Gárja - Crow a crow
Gumpe - Wolf a wolf
Onne lim (I was small) about being in nature South Saami
Buot eallá (everything is alive) about how to behave in nature
Arvas (Arvas) about a place called Arvas
Várre (Mountain) about mining in northern Sweden, Lule Saami
Njuvccat bohtet (swans are coming) about swans
Gáhkkor about some bird
Javrrit juiget (lakes are singing)

Linguaphile
Posts: 3340
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Livonian

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-11-03, 5:32

awrui wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:
hajoseszter wrote:Could you also recommend me any folk song about/related to nature? In any small languages you know.

These are a few in "small languages" for which the translation is already posted:
Gula gula (Listen listen) (bottom of the post), about listening to nature, in Northern Saami
Julevädno (Lule River), about the river, in Lule Saami
Pääsköilintu, päivöilintu (Swallow, Bird of the Sun), a creation story based on nature, in Izhorian
Lendi linduine (A Bird Flew), a creation story based on nature, in Veps
Abuta, Jumal (Help, God) about drought, in Veps

Here a few Saami ones, most in North Saami.
Birkoj (Bjørgefjell) A mountain South Saami
Maze (Masi) A village
Duna Duna about a reindeer I think? Skolt Saami
These are folk songs I know. But there are quite a few pop songs!
Gárja - Crow a crow
Gumpe - Wolf a wolf
Onne lim (I was small) about being in nature South Saami
Buot eallá (everything is alive) about how to behave in nature
Arvas (Arvas) about a place called Arvas
Várre (Mountain) about mining in northern Sweden, Lule Saami
Njuvccat bohtet (swans are coming) about swans
Gáhkkor about some bird
Javrrit juiget (lakes are singing)



Iđitguovssu (Dawn Light) about a swan, in Northern Saami
Vihma Loits (Incantation of Rain) about rainstorms, in Võro
Lubadus (The Promise) about a sheep, in Võro
Põhjatuuled (North Wind) about living in nature, in Võro
Tuule sõnad (Wind Words) about the wind, in Estonian
Õhtu ilu (Beauty of Evening) about the evening, in Estonian
Veere veere päevakene (Roll, Day) about the sun, in Estonian
Tammetsõõr (Oak Circle) about interconnectedness of nature, in Estonian
Hüüdvad hülged (Calling Seals) about seals, sea birds and fishing, in Estonian
Siidisulis linnukene (Silk-Feathered Little Bird) creation story based on nature, in Estonian
Suur tamm (Big Oak), about a mythical tree, in Estonian

hajoseszter
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Real Name: Eszter Hajós
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Re: Livonian

Postby hajoseszter » 2020-11-17, 10:54

Linguaphile wrote:
hajoseszter wrote:Hi, I would like to ask you about a Livonian folk song's lyrics.
Here is this song sung by Skandenieki: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubjiEVEhKv8
There is a lyrics in the description, but after seeing another version in this site - I'm not sure.
There was a post before of Tuļļi Lum's Jōņ loul lyrics - the first two verses are the same, I think. Could you help me with the rest of the song? I would like to have the lyrics as precise as it could be, with all diacritics and things. (And maybe some explanation about the words). Thank you!

Their translation is really quite good. It's good enough that I'm adding my own translation for the individual words below but using their translations for the full lines. The differences between theirs and the one I posted previously on this forum are due to their second stanzas being entirely different, not due to translation issues (except for one concerning the word viedāmõsõ, which I've explained below).
Their spelling seems to be a little off (pūošõdõn not pousõdõn, amā jõvā not amajuva, etc.) Below, I've changed the spelling.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubjiEVEhKv8

Ak sa Jōņõ, ēdrum Jōņõ = Oh, you John, John of the blooms
    ak = oh
    sa = you (they have it capitalized, like many European languages do in writing. I haven't seen this done in Livonian elsewhere, but I don't see why not.)
    Jōņõ = Saint John in this case, but it is also just the name "John" in general
    ēdrum = flower, bloom
    Jōņõ = [Saint] John
    They have written this last part as one word: ēdrumjōņõ = "bloom-John". I don't really see anything wrong with that. Compound words are extremely common. The reason I write it as two words is because it seems awkward to me to use a proper noun (Jōņõ) in the second part of the compound. I feel like proper name should be capitalized and you can't capitalize it mid-word. But I don't know what Livonian spelling rules would really have to say about that. Perhaps ēdrum-Jōņõ would work.
Mis sin ummõ viedāmõsõ = What have you got in the carriage?
    mis = what
    sin = your (you, genitive case)
    ummõ = your own, one’s one
    viedāmõsõ = into cargo (viedām = cargo)
    In my earlier translation of this song I had this written viedāmõsõ as two words. That's an error. Back then I mis-analyzed viedā as a form of the verb vieddā (to carry) rather than of the noun viedām (cargo). And I couldn't figure out the meaning mõsõ back then, because on its own it isn't a word. But I understand it now: as viedāmõsõ it means "in the cargo", referring to what he has in his carriage or wagon. So literally it is asking "What do you have in your cargo?"
Neitsõdõn um kūldist vāņka = golden wreaths for the maidens
    neitsõdõn = the girls (dative case)
    um = is
    kūldist = golden
    vāņka = wreath, garland (of flowers or cloth)
    I believe the "golden wreaths" are made out of gold-colored flowers. Vāņkad would not normally be made of actual gold as far as I know.
Pūošõdõn um tšounõ kibār. = Marten's fur caps for the lads
    pūošõdõn = the boys (dative case)
    um = is
    tšounõ = marten (in this case, referring to the fur of the marten, but it just means "marten")
    kibār = cap
Amā jõvā Jōņõāina = All the good John's herbs
    amā = all, everything
    jõvā = good
    Jōņõ = [Saint] John’s
    āina = plants, grass, herbs
    As a compound word Jōņõāina refers to the plants/grasses/herbs used for Saint John's Day/Midsummer (this is also referred to in the next line). I've heard this before as Jōņāina, but in the recording they clearly say Jōņõāina. I'm not sure if that's a dialect variation or the extra syllable was added to maintain the correct meter in the song.
mis katkūb Jōņȭdõn = that are picked on St. John's Eve
    mis = what, which
    katkūb = plucks, breaks, cracks - it refers to breaking something, but here it means picking the ferns and flowers, since you have to break stems in order to pick them
    Jōņȭdõn = on Saint John’s Eve (ȭdõn= in the evening); on Midsummer's Eve
Papāstõmd, īrtabārd = fern, yarrow
    papāstõmd = ferns (plural)
    tabārd = yarrows (plural)
    īrtabārd = a specific kind of yarrow: “mouse-yarrow”, īr = mouse, tabārd is the plural of tabār “yarrow”
Punni, vālda ōboliņ = red and white little clover
    punni = red
    vālda = white
    ōbiliņ= little clover (from ōbiļ "clover")


Back here, I just want to ask you what is Jānīti? (You missed it from the text here, but I've found it in Tuļļi lum song's lyrics you uploaded before). Also how can līgõ be translated or explained? I saw you wrote that in this song it don't have a specific meaning, I'm just wondering. Thank you!

Linguaphile
Posts: 3340
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Livonian

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-11-17, 15:20

hajoseszter wrote:Back here, I just want to ask you what is Jānīti? (You missed it from the text here, but I've found it in Tuļļi lum song's lyrics you uploaded before). Also how can līgõ be translated or explained? I saw you wrote that in this song it don't have a specific meaning, I'm just wondering. Thank you!

Both of these are refrains associated with the midsummer celebration. Jānīti is from a Latvian diminutive form of the name for Saint John. So its use here is as far as I know influence from Latvian, but refers again to Saint John.
"Līgõ" here is just a refrain that doesn't have a specific meaning, but it is also associated with the midsummer celebration. Refrains like this are used at the end of lines (in Livonian, Estonian, etc. songs) to create the rhythm and to give the singer time to come up with (remember or invent) the next line. They are usually said twice (līgõ, līgõ) and used at the end of every line of a given song. Some have no meaning at all.
So it could be thought of as simply a "meaningless refrain" because that is how it is used, but in this case "līgõ" does have several potential meanings. One meaning of "līgõ" is simply "to sing midsummer songs" (AFAIK this meaning arose due to the use of the refrain in midsummer songs, rather than the other way around) and another meaning is "swing, sway" (infinitive form of the verb līgõ) or "come, stay" (jussive form of the verb līdõ). So it is somewhat ambiguous here, just a sort of refrain related to midsummer inviting people to join the song or to join the celebration, without precise meaning but understood to mean roughly something like "we're singing this song, join the midsummer festivities!". Again the reason it is there in the song is more to set the atmosphere and maintain the desired rhythm, not so much for its specific meaning, but when people hear "līgõ, līgõ" they would know a midsummer song is being sung.

As another example, here is a Võro/South Estonian midsummer song that uses the refrain "liigo". The song is called simply "Liigolaul" (liigo-song, which the dictionary defines as "Latvian Midsummer Song") and the singer has not included the refrain in the lyrics she posted in the video description. In other words it is more "a feature of this type of song" than actual meaningful lyrics. The refrain is used in Latvian midsummer songs as well, so, basically, throughout the whole region in various languages.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kaf8phUTavs
The Finnish band Värttinä, who sing in Finnish but have a lot of influences from other Finno-Ugric languages in their songs, also has a song called Liigua with the refrain "liigua, liigua":
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaUmv7fDpGw
And a Latvian one (where again they did not include the "līgo" lines in the lyrics that are written in the description, presumably because those lines aren't considered to add any meaning to the song) - although in Latvian you can also translate it as "sway". Whether or not it is meant to have that meaning in midsummer songs seems to be open to debate. Here, you can hear various variations of it from the different singers from (judging from their clothing) different regions of Latvia, at different points in the song - they don't all pronounce it as līgo:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2r-uspx6LM

Linguaphile
Posts: 3340
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Livonian

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-02-06, 19:47

Kōd kīelkõks ma sīndiz - Baiba Damberga
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0RIji3anc0

Kōd kīelkõks ma sīndiz
Izā iz sō midēid kītõ
ku škūoliš ma opīz jõvīst
jemā andtõd lețkīeldõ
nõtkõ saksā ja krīevõ
ja dialektika kīelkõks.

Kuņtš kēļ, mis āndiz min izā -
līvõkēļ kālmadtarā kīelas;
vīrgizt kūorad nei obbõ
līvõkīels rõkāndõ jougõks,
ailijiz pīladõks,
pizārkuodādõks
kivīdõd mīer pūojsõ
kūolõnd kilād gadāgõdõks.

Ja ni mer, andõksõks ānda,
ja vȱida ēņtšta,
izāndõd ētabõd virpõļi.
Ja alā and, Jumāl,
vel siedā tȕoizta kīeldõ
kālmadtarā kīela sil tänktõ.

English:
► Show Spoiler


Finnish:
► Show Spoiler


Hungarian:
► Show Spoiler

Linguaphile
Posts: 3340
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Livonian

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-02-20, 23:31

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvsYs0P-jTE

livõ kēļ = Livonian language
rāndakēļ = Livonian language (lit. coastal language)
ikš = 1
kakš = 2
kuolm = 3
nēļa = 4
vīž = 5
kūž = 6
seis = 7
kōdõks = 8
īdõks = 9
kim = 10
tēriņtš = hello
nēmiz pǟl = see you soon
jõvā ūomõg = good morning
jõvā pǟva = good afternoon
jõvā ȭdõg = good evening
nǟ = yes
äp = no
pōlaks = please
tienū = thank you
ānda andõks = excuse me
kurā = left
jõvā = right

punni = red
õļaz = green (natural), verdant
mõltsi = green (dyed)
vīri = yellow
oranž = orange
siņņi = blue
brūni = brown
lilla = purple
vālda = white
rõza = pink
mustā = black
ǭgi = grey

mīez = man
nai = woman
neitst = girl
pȯis = boy
läpš = child
izā = father
ǟma = mother
vanāǟma = grandmother
vanāizā = grandfather
sõzār = sister
veļ = brother
pūoga = son
tidār = daughter

janvār = January
tōlakū = January
februar = February
kīņḑõļkū = February
märts = March
kievādkū = March
april = April
jūrikškū = April
mai = May
lēḑkū = May
jūnij = June
jõņpǟva kū = June
jūlij = July
ainakū = July
ougust = August
vīļakū = August
septembõr = September
mikīļkū = September
oktōbõr = October
vīmkū = October
novembõr = November
kīlmakū = November
detsembõr = December

telefōn = telephone
võțmõd = keys
lovā = bed
kuodā = house
vantubā = bathroom
dūš = shower
paš = passport
kredītkõrõz = credit card
zēp = soap
abbõndveis = razor
ambõdpast = toothpaste
ambõdlūdõ = toothbrush
kem = comb
ōŗa = hairbrush
sīlmadõrõn = towel
veis = knife
ang = fork
kõj = spoon
tarīļ = plate
vīrbad = chopsticks
kațļā = saucepan

kōla = cola
tē = tea
vež = water
vȯl = beer
vīnõ = wine
sēmḑa = milk
kaffe = coffee
munād = eggs
tsukkõr = sugar
vȭidag = butter
sȭira = cheese
lēba = bread
rīs = rice
kalā = fish
knīplõka = garlic
tšipsõz = chips
pitsa = pizza
kūmilēba = burger
mangō = mango
banān = banana
umārz = apple
bumbīer = oear
mõškõz = strawberry
greipfrūt = grapefruit
tsitron = lemon
applõlsin = orange
ounõmõŗa = raspberry
vīnõmõŗad = grapes
plūm = plum
tomāt = tomato
pietk = buttermilk
borkõn = carrot
sīpõl = onion
guŗkõz = cucumber
naggõrz = potato
ruš = potato with skin
sīend = mushrooms

pǟ = head
pȯsk = cheek
kaggõl = neck
ibūkst = hair
kūora = ear
sīlma = eye
nanā = nose
sū = mouth
pūola = knee
kīndõrpū = elbow
lūbē = ankle
jālga = leg
labā = foot
pēgal = thumb
suoŗm = finger
kež = hand, arm
piv = hand

min izāmō = my fatherland
min sindimō = land of my birth (my birth-land)
ūod ārmaz rānda sa = you, beloved coast
kus rāndanaigās kazābõd = where on the shore grow
vel vanād, vizād piedāgõd = still old, strong pines
min ārmaz īlmas ūod set sa = in this world only you are dear to me
min tõurõz izāmō = my precious fatherland

min izāmō = my fatherland
min sindimō = landõ of my birth (my birth-land)
ūod ārmaz rānda sa = you, beloved coast
kus lāinõd mierstõ vīerõbõd = where waves from the sea roll
un rāndan sūdõ āndabõd = and give their mouths to the shore
min ārmaz īlmas ūod set sa = in this world only you are dear to me
min tõurõz izāmō = my precious fatherland

Läpš, u sa tiedõd, kis sīnda māīlmas ama jemiņ ārmastõb? = child, do you know who in this world most loves you?
U sa tiedõd, kis um sin ama jõva sõbra māīlmas? = do you know who is your best friend in the world?
Se um sin eņtš ǟma. = It is your own mother.
Ta um sinnõn ama tõurõz mā pǟl = She is your most precious in the world.
Juba siz, ku sa vel ist mūošta kǟdõ = already when you still didn't know how to walk
ta vōidiz sīnda silsõ = she held you in her arms
Ta um sīnda voidõn ja sīetõn = she cared for and fed you
ta um loulõn sinnõn lōlidi = she sang songs to you
sīnda maggõm pandsõ ja ältõs = putting you to bed and rocking you

Ka īdsīd vel jeddõpēḑõn ta sīnda võidab = she also continues to care for you
Ta piezub ja sigub sīnda = she washes and grooms you
Ta kīetõb sinnõn sīedõ = she cooks food for you to eat
Ta umblõb sinnõn āriņi = she sews clothes for you
piezub ja parantõb nēḑi = washes and mends them
Ku itkud, siz ta sīnda vagastõb = when you cry she quiets you
Ta panab sīnda ȭdõn lovvõl = she puts you into bed
ja pivastõb sīnda = and keeps vigil
kuņtš sa magud = until you fall asleep

Sin jema, läpš = your mother, child
um sinnõn ama tõurõz āndõks = is your most precious gift
mis Jumal um sinnõn andõn = that God has given you
Ilmõ jemmõ sa volkst piški joutõm = without [your] mother you would be small, poor
ilmõ vonnõ = without happiness
ja vōidamõt māīlmas = and uncared for in the world

Až sa ūod ruja = if you are sick
ǟma um iganiz sin jūsõ = [your] mother is always at your side
Ta sinnõn pūstõb vōntsast ig = she wipes sweat from your forehead
ku sa ūod väzzõn = when you are tired
Ta tīeb sin lova pīemdõks = she makes your bed soft
ja āndab sinnõn aiņi = and gives you medicine
Ka īezõ ta äb mag = and at night she doesn't sleep
siz ta pīlõb sin lova jūsõ = then she stays at your bedside
ja pālab ārmast Jumal iļ sin = and prays to beloved God for you

Linguaphile
Posts: 3340
Joined: 2016-09-17, 5:06

Re: Livonian

Postby Linguaphile » 2021-02-21, 3:18

Focusing more on the last section of the previous video (starting at 3:55), where the video's translation differs quite a bit from mine.
Differences between their translation and mine are mostly verb tenses, a few incorrectly worded English translations (she boiled you to eat :!: ) and a few phrases which I think they may have misunderstood (when you learned to walk; she made a bed for you; she rubbed and fed you). Of course, there's no guarantee it's not me who has misunderstood! I've bolded the main differences. Words in parenthesis are dictionary forms (i.e. nominative or infinitive); words in brackets at the end of each line are Estonian translations, aiming for cognates where more than one translation is possible (even if the cognate is not the most common form, i.e. itkema vs. nutma, lava vs. voodi).



Läpš, u sa tiedõd, kis sīnda māīlmas ama jemiņ ārmastõb?
video's translation: child, you know, that you are loved?
my translation: child, do you know who in this world most loves you?
    läpš child [Estonian: laps]
    u (question marker) [kas]
    sa you [sa]
    tiedõd (tieudõ) know [tead, teada]
    kis who [kes]
    sīnda you [sind]
    māīlmas in the word [maailmas]
    ama (amā) most [kõige]
    jemīņ farther, more [enam]
    ārmastõb (ārmaztõ) loves [armastab, armastada]
U sa tiedõd, kis um sin ama jõva sõbra māīlmas?
video's translation: you know, that you have the best friend in the world?
my translation: do you know who is your best friend in the world?
    u (question marker) [kas]
    sa you [sa]
    tiedõd (tieudõ) know [tead, teada]
    kis who [kes]
    um is [on]
    sin your [sinu]
    ama (amā) most [kõige]
    jõva good [hea/hüva/parem]
    sõbra (sõbrā) friend [sõber]
    māīlmas (mǭīlma) in the world [maailmas]
Se um sin eņtš ǟma.
video's and my translation: It is your own mother.
    se it [see]
    um is [on]
    sin your [sinu]
    eņtš own [enda, oma]
    ǟma mother [ema]
Ta um sinnõn ama tõurõz mā pǟl.
video's translation: She is your most precious world.
my translation: She is your most precious in the world.
    ta he, she [ta]
    um is [on]
    sinnõn your [sinu]
    ama (amā) most [kõige]
    tõurõz precious, dear [kallis]
    mā pǟl on the earth, in the world [maa peal]
Juba siz, ku sa vel ist mūošta kǟdõ
video's translation: already since childhood, when you learned to walk
my translation: already when you still didn't know how to walk
    juba already [juba]
    siz then [siis]
    ku when [kui]
    sa you [sa]
    vel still [veel]
    ist didn't [ei]
    mūošta (mȯistõ) know [mõista, oska]
    kǟdõ to walk [käia, kõndida]
ta vōidiz sīnda silsõ
video's translation: she held you gently
my translation: she held you in her arms
    ta he, she [ta]
    vōidiz (vȯidõ) held, kept, cared for [hoidis, hoida]
    sīnda you [sind]
    silsõ (siļ) into [her] arms/lap [sülle, süli]
Ta um sīnda voidõn ja sīetõn
video's translation: she rubbed and fed you
my translation: she cared for and fed you
    ta he, she [ta]
    um is, has [om]
    sīnda you [sind]
    voidõn (vȯidõ) cared for, looked after
    ja and [ja]
    sīetõn (sīetõ) fed [söötnud, sööta]
ta um loulõn sinnõn lōlidi sīnda maggõm pandsõ ja ältõs
video's translation: she sang songs while putting you to sleep and nurturing
my translation: she sang songs to you while putting you to bed [to sleep] and rocking you
    ta he, she [ta]
    um is, has [on]
    loulõn (loulõ) sung [laulnud, laulda]
    sinnõn to you [sulle]
    lōlidi (loul) songs [laule, laul]
    sīnda you [sind]
    maggõm to sleep [magama[/b]
    pandsõ (pānda) putting [pannes, panna]
    ja and [ja]
    ältõs (ältõ) rocking [hällitades]
Ka īdsīd vel jeddõpēḑõn ta sīnda võidab
video's translation: she also protected you
my tentative translation: she also continues to care for you
    ka also [ka]
    īdsīd together? [ühes?]
    vel still [veel]
    jeddõpēḑõn from now on [edaspidi]
    ta he, she [ta]
    sīnda you [sind]
    võidab (vȯidõ) holds, cares for, looks after [hoiab, hoida]
Ta piezub ja sigub sīnda
video's translation: she washed and brushed you
my translation: she washes and grooms you
    ta he, she [ta]
    piezub (piezzõ) washes [peseb, pesta]
    ja and [ja]
    sigub, siggõ grooms, brushes, combs [sugeb, sugema]
    sīnda you [sind]
Ta kīetõb sinnõn sīedõ
video's translation: she boiled you to eat
my translation: she cooks food for you to eat
    ta he, she [ta]
    kīetõb, kīetõ boils, cooks [keedab, keeta]
    sinnõn for you [sulle]
    sīedõ to eat; food [süüa]
Ta umblõb sinnõn āriņi = she sews clothes for you
    ta he, she [ta]
    umblõb (umblõ) sews [õmbleb, õmmelda]
    sinnõn for you [sulle]
    āriņi/ǭriņi (ǭrõnd) clothing [riideid]
piezub ja parantõb nēḑi
video's translation: washed and repaired them
my translation: washes and mends them
    piezub (piezzõ) washes [peseb, pesta]
    ja and [ja]
    parantõb (parāntõ) repairs, mends [parandab, parandada]
    nēḑi them [neid]
Ku itkud, siz ta sīnda vagastõb
video's translation: when you cried, she comforted you
my translation: when you cry she quiets you
    ku when, if [kui]
    itkud you cry [itked, itkema]
    siz then [siis]
    ta he, she [ta]
    sīnda you [sind]
    vagastõb (vagastõ) quiets, hushes, shushes [vaigistab, vaigistada]
Ta panab sīnda ȭdõn lovvõl
video's translation: she put you to sleep
my translation: she puts you into bed
    ta he, she [ta]
    panab, pānda puts [paneb, panna]
    sīnda you [sind]
    ȭdõn, ȭdõg in the evening [õhtul, õhtu]
    lovvõl (lovā) into bed [laval/lavale, lava; voodisse, voodi]
ja pivastõb sīnda kuņtš sa magud
video's translation: and waited for you to fall asleep
my translation: and keeps vigil until you fall asleep
    ja and [ja]
    pivastõb (pivāstõ) celebrate, bless, look after [pühitseb, pühitseda]
    sīnda you [sind]
    kuņtš until [kuni]
    sa you [sa]
    magud (maggõ) sleep [magad, magada]
Sin jema, läpš, um sinnõn ama tõurõz āndõks
video's and my translation: your mother, child, is your most precious gift
    sin your [sinu]
    jema mother [ema]
    läpš child [laps]
    um is [on]
    sinnõn your [sinu]
    ama (amā) most [kõige]
    tõurõz precious, dear [kallis]
    āndõks gift [anne]
mis Jumal um sinnõn andõn
video's and my translation: that God has [ever] given you
    mis that, what [mis]
    Jumal God [Jumal]
    um is, has [on]
    sinnõn to you [sulle]
    andõn given [andnud]
Ilmõ jemmõ sa volkst piški joutõm
video's and my translation: without [your] mother you would be small, poor
    ilmõ without [ilma]
    jemmõ (jemā) mother [emata, ema]
    sa you [sa]
    volkst (vȯlkst) would be [oleksid]
    piški small, little [pisike]
    joutõm poor, feeble [jõuetu, kehv, vaene]
ilmõ vonnõ ja vōidamõt māīlmas
video's translation: without happiness and care in the world
my translation: without happiness and uncared for in the world
    ilmõ without [ilma]
    vonnõ happiness [õnn]
    ja and [ja]
    vōidamõt (vȯidõ) [without] being cared for [hoolitsuseta, hoidmiseta]
Až sa ūod ruja
video's translation: if you were sick
my translation: if you are sick
    if [kui]
    sa you [sa]
    ūod are [oled]
    ruja (rujā) sick [haige]
ǟma um iganiz sin jūsõ
video's translation: she was always next to you
my translation: [your] mother is always at your side
    ǟma mother [ema]
    um is [on]
    igāniz always, forever [iganes, igavesti]
    sin jūsõ beside you [sinu juures]
Ta sinnõn pūstõb vōntsast ig
video's translation: she swept sweat from your forehead
my translation: she wipes sweat from your forehead
    ta he, she [ta]
    sinnõn for you [sulle]
    pūstõb (pūstõ) wipe, sweep [pühib, pühkima]
    vōntsast (vȱntsa) from the forehead [laubast, otsmikust]
    ig sweat [higi]
ku sa ūod väzzõn
video's translation: if you were tired
my translation: when you are tired
    ku when, if [kui]
    sa you [sa]
    ūod are [oled]
    väzzõn tired [väsinud]
Ta tīeb sin lova pīemdõks ja āndab sinnõn aiņi
video's translation: she made your bed soft and gave you medicine
my translation: she makes your bed soft and gives you medicine
    ta he, she [ta]
    tīeb, tīedõ makes [teeb, teha]
    sin your [sinu]
    lova (lovā) bed [lava, voodi]
    pīemdõks (pīemdõ) soft [pehme, pehmeks]
    ja and [ja]
    āndab (andõ) gives [annab, anda]
    sinnõn to you [sulle]
    aiņi (āinad) medicine [rohi, ravim; cognate with hein]
Ka īezõ ta äb mag
video's translation: at night she also did not sleep
my translation: and at night she doesn't sleep
    ka also
    īezõ (īe) at night [öösel, öö]
    ta he, she [ta]
    äb doesn't [ei]
    mag (maggõ) sleep [maga, magada]
siz ta pīlõb sin lova jūsõ
video's translation: she made a bed for you
my translation: then she stays at your bedside
    siz then [siis]
    ta he, she [ta]
    pīlõb (pīlõ) stays, sits, stands [seisab, istub, püsib]
    sin lova jūsõ by your bed [sinu lava/voodi juures]
ja pālab ārmast Jumal iļ sin
video's translation: and prayed beloved God for you
my translation: and prays to beloved God for you
    ja and [ja]
    pālab (pallõ) ask, pray [palub, palvetab]
    ārmast (ārmaz) dear, beloved [armas]
    Jumal God [Jumal]
    for, about, because of [üle, kohta, pärast]
    sin you [sind]


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