Elaine - Gaeilge

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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby Multiturquoise » 2014-01-14, 14:12

linguoboy wrote:Cár mhaith leat dul?


Ba mhaith liom dul go hÉirinn.
I want to go to Ireland.

I want to ask a question.
When should I use "a" in which sentences? [I'm not talking about the possessive word "a" (his, her, their)]

And what is the difference between Tá uaim and Ba mhaith liom?
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2014-01-14, 15:28

Eibhlín wrote:When should I use "a" in which sentences? [I'm not talking about the possessive word "a" (his, her, their)]

There are at least six a's in Irish, not even including the possessive determiner you just mentioned. I imagine you have in mind either the relative particle a or the worn-down form of the preposition do that is found in verbal noun phrases (e.g. rudaí a dhéanamh "doing things/things to do"). Either way, your question does not have a simple answer.

Eibhlín wrote:And what is the difference between Tá uaim and Ba mhaith liom?

Tá uaim can mean "I need" as well as "I want". Ba mhaith liom can express "I would like" as well as "I want". For instance, if I usually had milk on hand but I happened to be out of it, I might say Tá bainne uaim. But if I were drinking tea and thought it would taste better with some milk in it, I'd be more likely to say Ba mhaith liom bainne.
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2014-01-16, 16:07

An bhfuil drom tugtha leis an nGaeilge cheana féin agat, a Eibhlín?
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby Multiturquoise » 2014-01-16, 16:33

linguoboy wrote:An bhfuil drom tugtha leis an nGaeilge cheana féin agat, a Eibhlín?


Can you also provide an English version? Because I'm a beginner in Irish ;)
I know I didn't post here, but I continue to learn Irish.
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2014-01-16, 17:32

Eibhlín wrote:
linguoboy wrote:An bhfuil drom tugtha leis an nGaeilge cheana féin agat, a Eibhlín?

Can you also provide an English version? Because I'm a beginner in Irish ;)
I know I didn't post here, but I continue to learn Irish.

Then you've answered my question, which is "Are you done with Irish already?" (Literally, "Is your back [drom] turned [tugtha] to it [leis]?")
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby Multiturquoise » 2014-01-16, 21:16

linguoboy wrote:
Eibhlín wrote:
linguoboy wrote:An bhfuil drom tugtha leis an nGaeilge cheana féin agat, a Eibhlín?

Can you also provide an English version? Because I'm a beginner in Irish ;)
I know I didn't post here, but I continue to learn Irish.

Then you've answered my question, which is "Are you done with Irish already?" (Literally, "Is your back [drom] turned [tugtha] to it [leis]?")


And now, I'm learning the forms of some feminine words.

widow
nom. baintreach
gen. baintrí
pl. baintreacha

lie, falsehood
nom. bréag
gen. bréige
pl. bréaga

shoe
nom. bróg
gen. bróige
pl. bróga

hen
nom. cearc
gen. circe
pl. cearca

sense, meaning
nom. ciall
gen. céille
pl. cialla

family
nom. clann
gen. clainne
pl. clanna

ear
nom. cluas
gen. cluaise
pl. cluasa

leg, foot
nom. cos
gen. coise
pl. cosa

window
nom. fuinneog
gen. fuinneoige
pl. fuinneoga
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2014-01-16, 21:55

For vocabulary-building purposes, it might help to know that these nouns historically had dative forms generally equivalent to the genitive minus -e. They're obsolete nowadays, but some still appear in various fixed expressions. For instance:

cuir i gcéill "give [someone] to understand, show [someone]" (lit. "put into sense")
focal i gcluais "a word in the ear, a whispered word"
le cois "along with, in addition, besides" (lit. "to leg")
faoi chois "underfoot" (cuir faoi chois "suppress")
ar chois "afoot" (tá sí ar a cois "she is on her feet, she is out and about")
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby Deghebh » 2014-05-11, 10:16

Eibhlín wrote:And what is the difference between Tá uaim and Ba mhaith liom?
linguoboy wrote:Tá uaim can mean "I need" as well as "I want". Ba mhaith liom can express "I would like" as well as "I want". For instance, if I usually had milk on hand but I happened to be out of it, I might say Tá bainne uaim. But if I were drinking tea and thought it would taste better with some milk in it, I'd be more likely to say Ba mhaith liom bainne.

Gabh mo leithscéal, is mise eejit, ach,
maybe if you try to understand the literal meaning of the idiom, you might get the shade of the meaning.
Ba mhaith liom == (it would be) (good) (with/for me).
In Northern English dialect, we have a similar phrase:
"It's ok by me" meaning roughly, "I approve of it ."
Put into the subjunctive, like the Irish phrase, you would then get:
'I would approve of it'.
Hence linguaboy's interpretation, NOT translation, 'I would like' is very accurate'
It expresses desire, not need.
It is information, not an imperative.
Le meas,
Deghebh.

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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby Multiturquoise » 2014-05-17, 18:07

Don't hesitate to correct these:

Tá Saoirse ag an scoil. - Saoirse's at school.
Tá Saoirse ag rith. - Saoirse's running.
Tá Saoirse ag dul go dtí an banc. - Saoirse's going to the bank.
Tá mé ag dul go dtí teach an chailín. - I'm going to the girl's house.
Níl mé ag dul go dtí teach an chailín. - I'm not going to the girl's house.
Tá mé ag dul go dtí teach na gcailíní. - I'm going to the girls' house.
Níl mé ag dul go dtí teach na gcailíní. - I'm not going to the girls' house.
Níor mhaith liom dul go dtí an banc. - I don't want to go to the bank.
Chuaigh m’iníon go hÉirinn. - My daughter went to Ireland.
Fuair mianadóirí go leor bás i Soma. - Many miners died in Soma.
Tá mé i mo chónaí i Sasana. - I live in England.
Tá, tá mé i mo chónaí i Iostanbúl. - Yes, I live in Istanbul.
Is Turcach mé. - I'm Turkish.
Tá Seán ina chónaí i mBaile Átha Cliath. - Seán lives in Dublin.
Tá Eibhlín ina cónaí i nGaillimh. - Eibhlín lives in Galway.
Tá Saoirse ina cónaí i nDroichead Átha. Saoirse lives in Drogheda.
Tá ceart chun cónaí ag gach duine. - Everyone has a right to live.
Tá súile áille ag Aisling. - Aisling has beautiful eyes.
Is Éireannach í Aisling. - Aisling is Irish.
Tá súil agam go rachaidh mé go hÉirinn. - I hope I will go to Ireland.
Tá siad ina gcónaí i Londain. - They live in London.
Tá mé ag éisteacht le ceol. - I'm listening to music.
Is breá liom ceol Gaelach. - I love Irish music.
Is cailín go hálainn í Cáit. - Cáit is a beautiful girl.
Tá Bríd ag cócaireacht císte anois. - Bríd is cooking a cake now.
Cá bhfuil Bríd? Tá sí anseo. - Where's Bríd? She's here.
Ní féidir liom féachaint Bríd. - I can't see Bríd.
An bhfuil Ciarán anseo? Tá, tá sé anseo. Is Ciarán here? Yes, he's here.
Nach bhfuil Caitlín ag déanamh damhsa? - Isn't Caitlín dancing?

You can correct the text below as well:

Fáilte. Tá brón orm, mar gheall fuair go leor daoine bás i Soma. Má tá a fhios seo ag duine ar bith, tá brón aige. Ní dhearmadfaidh mé go deo é.

Hello. I'm sorry, because many people died in Soma. If anyone knows this, they're sad. I'll never forget it.
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby Ciarán12 » 2014-05-19, 13:28

Hey, cúpla ceartúchán duit:

Eibhlín wrote:Tá Saoirse ag an scoil. - Saoirse's at school.


This is okay if you mean that she is physically at the school now. In English you can also use this phrase to mean that someone is of school-going age and regularly attends school, in which case I would say "ar scoil" instead of "ag an scoil".

Eibhlín wrote:Tá Saoirse ag rith. - Saoirse's running.
Tá Saoirse ag dul go dtí an banc. - Saoirse's going to the bank.
Tá mé ag dul go dtí teach an chailín. - I'm going to the girl's house.
Níl mé ag dul go dtí teach an chailín. - I'm not going to the girl's house.
Tá mé ag dul go dtí teach na gcailíní. - I'm going to the girls' house.
Níl mé ag dul go dtí teach na gcailíní. - I'm not going to the girls' house.
Níor mhaith liom dul go dtí an banc. - I don't want to go to the bank.
Chuaigh m’iníon go hÉirinn. - My daughter went to Ireland.


These all look fine.

Eibhlín wrote:Fuair mianadóirí go leor bás i Soma. - Many miners died in Soma.


This should be "go leor mianadóirí" - "go leor" comes before nouns when used to mean "many" but after adjectives when used to mean "very, quite".

Eibhlín wrote:Tá mé i mo chónaí i Sasana. - I live in England.
Tá, tá mé i mo chónaí in Iostanbúl. - Yes, I live in Istanbul.
Is Turcach mé. - I'm Turkish.
Tá Seán ina chónaí i mBaile Átha Cliath. - Seán lives in Dublin.
Tá Eibhlín ina cónaí i nGaillimh. - Eibhlín lives in Galway.
Tá Saoirse ina cónaí i nDroichead Átha. Saoirse lives in Drogheda.


Good, just one correction.

Eibhlín wrote:Tá ceart chun cónaí ag gach duine. - Everyone has a right to live.


"cónaí" only means "living" is the sense of residing somewhere, so you can't use it like this.
I would say "Tá an ceart chun beatha ag gach duine." - "Everyone has the right to life." (I also found "an ceart chun marthana" when looking for "right to life")

Eibhlín wrote:Tá súile áille ag Aisling. - Aisling has beautiful eyes.
Is Éireannach í Aisling. - Aisling is Irish.
Tá súil agam go rachaidh mé go hÉirinn. - I hope I will go to Ireland.
Tá siad ina gcónaí i Londain. - They live in London.
Tá mé ag éisteacht le ceol. - I'm listening to music.
Is breá liom ceol Gaelach. - I love Irish music.


Looks good to me.

Eibhlín wrote:Is cailín go hálainn í Cáit. - Cáit is a beautiful girl.


When the adjective "álainn" is used attributively as it is here, you don't need the "go", so "Is cailín álainn í Cáit", but "Tá sí go hálainn".

Eibhlín wrote:Tá Bríd ag cócaireacht císte anois. - Bríd is cooking a cake now.


I don't think it is normal in either English or Irish to say "cooking a cake". In both I would use "make a cake", so "Tá Bríd ag déanamh císte anois".

Eibhlín wrote:Cá bhfuil Bríd? Tá sí anseo. - Where's Bríd? She's here.
Ní féidir liom féachaint Bríd. - I can't see Bríd.


In Irish you always féachaint ar something, so it would be "Ní féidir liom féachaint ar Bríd." Also, this means "I can't watch Bríd", if you want to say "I can't see Bríd" you have to use the verb "feiceáil".

This is where it gets interesting: when you use "féachaint ar" you are using a verb followed by a preposition, so the word order required is to place the verbal noun directly after the phrase "Ní féidir liom" followed by the prepositional phrase. But "féiceáil" doesn't require a preposition, so the word order is as follows: "Ní féidir liom Bríd a fhéiceáil". The verbal noun gets sent to the end of the clause preceded by the particle "a" which causes lenition.

Eibhlín wrote:An bhfuil Ciarán anseo? Tá, tá sé anseo. Is Ciarán here? Yes, he's here.
Nach bhfuil Caitlín ag déanamh damhsa? - Isn't Caitlín dancing?


:waytogo:

Eibhlín wrote:You can correct the text below as well:

Fáilte. Tá brón orm, mar gheall fuair go leor daoine bás i Soma. Má tá a fhios seo ag duine ar bith, tá brón aige. Ní dhearmadfaidh mé go deo é.

Hello. I'm sorry, because many people died in Soma. If anyone knows this, they're sad. I'll never forget it.


"Fáilte" means "welcome". The normal greeting in Irish is "Dia dhuit" (to one person), "Dia dhaoibh" (to many people). You might also use "Haigh".

The phrasing of this is not entirely natural in English I'm afraid. I would suggest:

"I'm sorry for the many people who died in Soma. All who know of this are saddened greatly, we will never forget." This sounds kind of unaturally literary in normal speech, but I think the tone fits the solemnity of the message.

"Is oth liom go bhfuair na daoine i Soma bás. Tá dobrón ar gach éinne a bhfuil an t-eolas sin acu, ní dhéanfaimid dearmad air choiche."

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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby Multiturquoise » 2014-05-19, 14:12

Go raibh míle maith agat, a Chiaráin! ;)

I want to go to Ireland someday! I want to watch RTÉ and TG4. I want to taste Irish food. I want to meet Irish people. I love Ireland!
Ba mhaith liom dul go hÉirinn lá éigin! Ba mhaith liom féachaint ar RTÉ agus TG4. Ba mhaith liom bia na hÉireann a bhlaiseadh. Ba mhaith liom bualadh le muintir na hÉireann. Is breá liom Éire!
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby kevin » 2014-05-19, 14:19

Shouldn't it be Is breá liom Éire?

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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2014-05-19, 15:21

Ciarán12 wrote:
Eibhlín wrote:Is cailín go hálainn í Cáit. - Cáit is a beautiful girl.

When the adjective "álainn" is used attributively as it is here, you don't need the "go", so "Is cailín álainn í Cáit", but "Tá sí go hálainn".

Also it's worth mentioning that in predicative sentences like these, it's very common to put the adjective first, i.e.: Is álainn an cailín í Cáit.

Ciarán12 wrote:The phrasing of this is not entirely natural in English I'm afraid. I would suggest:

"I'm sorry for the many people who died in Soma. All who know of this are saddened greatly, we will never forget."

YDMV (Your Dialect May Vary), but in my English "I'm sorry because" and "I'm sorry for" don't mean the same thing. My sorrow could because of the suffering of the survivors, in which case it's them I'm "sorry for", not the dead.

Ciarán12 wrote:"Is oth liom go bhfuair na daoine i Soma bás. Tá dobrón ar gach éinne a bhfuil an t-eolas sin acu, ní dhéanfaimid dearmad air choíche."

I find eolas a bit odd here. Generally it implies a more comprehensive sort of knowledge than fios, so it sounds to me like you're saying only those with an understanding of what happened in Soma which goes beyond a bare knowledge of the facts are saddened.
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2014-05-19, 15:25

kevin wrote:Shouldn't it be Is breá liom Éire?

It should. na hÉireann is the genitive form.

In some dialects, the traditional dative (Éirinn) replaces the nominative/accusative.
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby Ciarán12 » 2014-05-19, 15:54

linguoboy wrote:YDMV (Your Dialect May Vary), but in my English "I'm sorry because" and "I'm sorry for" don't mean the same thing. My sorrow could because of the suffering of the survivors, in which case it's them I'm "sorry for", not the dead.


I suppose it must. IMD "I'm sorry because" doesn't really exist except to answer "Why are you sorry?". I wouldn't spontaneously come out with "I'm sorry because....".

linguoboy wrote:
Ciarán12 wrote:"Is oth liom go bhfuair na daoine i Soma bás. Tá dobrón ar gach éinne a bhfuil an t-eolas sin acu, ní dhéanfaimid dearmad air choíche."

I find eolas a bit odd here. Generally it implies a more comprehensive sort of knowledge than fios, so it sounds to me like you're saying only those with an understanding of what happened in Soma which goes beyond a bare knowledge of the facts are saddened.


Yeah, I wasn't entirely sure which idiom I should use for "to know" here, I went for "eolas a bheith agat" because I was trying to translate the English "to know about something". Could "fios" simply replace "eolas" in the sentence I had?

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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2014-05-19, 16:25

Ciarán12 wrote:Could "fios" simply replace "eolas" in the sentence I had?

I don't really see fios used with the definite article; I would replace an t-eolas sin with a fhios.
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby Multiturquoise » 2014-07-21, 16:01

And look at those sentences, and please correct whatever is wrong:

Scríobhfaidh mé scéal. - I'll write a story.
Is buachaill dóighiúil é Oisín. - Oisín is a handsome boy.
Ba mhaith liom abairt a scríobh. - I want to write a sentence.
Níl ciall leis an abairt seo. This sentence doesn't make sense.
Tá a fhios agam go bhfuil tú ag scríobh scéal deas. - I know that you're writing a nice story.
Nach bhfuil tú ag postáil seo ar Facebook? - Aren't you posting this on Facebook?
Tá mo chara ag ól canna cóla. - My friend is drinking a can of cola.
Ar ól tú cupán caife? - Did you drink a cup of coffee?
Ar chuaigh tú go dtí an t-ospidéal? Did you go to the hospital?
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby linguoboy » 2014-07-21, 16:11

Eibhlín wrote:Scríobhfaidh mé scéal. - I'll write a story.
Is buachaill dóighiúil é Oisín. - Oisín is a handsome boy.
Ba mhaith liom abairt a scríobh. - I want to write a sentence.
Níl ciall leis an abairt seo. This sentence doesn't make sense.
Tá a fhios agam go bhfuil tú ag scríobh scéal deas. - I know that you're writing a nice story.
Nach bhfuil tú á phostáil seo ar Facebook? - Aren't you posting this on Facebook?
Tá mo chara ag ól canna cóla. - My friend is drinking a can of cola.
Ar ól tú cupán caife? - Did you drink a cup of coffee?
Ar chuaigh tú go dtí an t-ospidéal? Did you go to the hospital?

Dea-shláinte agat! Níl sé daorbhasctha.
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby Multiturquoise » 2014-07-22, 12:27

Go raibh maith agat! Scríobhfaidh mé níos mó abairtí.
Thank you! I'll write more sentences.

Tá mo chroí ag cur fola. - My heart is bleeding.
Tá an bhó ag géimneach. - The cow is mooing.
Tá Caitlín ag léamh leabhar ina seomra. - Caitlín is reading a book in her room.
Ní raibh a fhios agam go raibh tú ag obair sa chomhlacht sin. - I didn’t know that you were working in that company.
Nuair a bhíonn am agam, scríobhfaidh mé litir chugat. - When I have time, I’ll write you a letter.
Léifidh mé an leabhar. - I’ll read the book.
Má tá go leor airgid agam, ceannóidh mé an foclóir sin. - If I have enough money, I’ll buy that dictionary.
Ba mhaith liom a pósadh tú. - I want to marry you.
Tá ár gcat an-ramhar. - Our cat is very fat.
Cén fáth a bhfuil tú ag ól fuisce? - Why are you drinking whiskey?
Chuaigh an buirgléir isteach inár dteach. - The burglar entered our house.
Ar ith mé seilide? - Did I eat a snail?
Ba mhaith le Caitlín dul a chodladh. - Caitlín wants to go to bed.

I'm doing these as drills to improve my Irish skills.
Last edited by Multiturquoise on 2014-07-22, 12:49, edited 1 time in total.
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kevin
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Re: Eibhlín - Gaeilge

Postby kevin » 2014-07-22, 12:45

Eibhlín wrote:Ar d'ith mé seilide? - Did I eat a snail?

I think this should be just "ith" instead of "d'ith".

Ba mhaith le Caitlín dul a chodladh. - Caitlín wants to go to bed.

And here I think that "a" causes lenition.


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