Native American Languages

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Quetzalcoatl
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Re: Native American Languages

Postby Quetzalcoatl » 2009-02-02, 13:26

One more thing to say:

I think many languages could be protected if they were better documentated... It might be a fact that many younger native Americans do not want to learn their own language anymore, but there will always be language freaks like us. 8-)

I'm personally very interested in Lakota, Chickasaw and Quechua (in the first two languages because I have already done homework about these two languages, mainly morphological analysis, and in Quechua because I'm rather interested in the people and the region where Quechua is spoken)

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Re: Re:

Postby Tukkumminnguaq » 2009-02-02, 13:35

Mutusen wrote:
Amaqqut wrote:
Nero wrote:About Agglunation:
English: I truly don't pronounce Cheyenne well: (6 words)
Cheyenne: náohkêsáa'oné'seómepêhévetsêhésto'anéhe (1 word)
)


náohkêsáa'oné'seómepêhévetsêhésto'anéhe (36 letters and 1 word)

Inuit would say:

Inuktituusuungutsialaarungnanngittuaraaluuvunga (48 letters and 1 word)
Inuktituusuungu-tsia-laaq-rungnanngit-tuaraaluk-vunga (6:1 ratio)
(Inuktitut-well-pronounce-dont-truly-I)

Inuktitut has not free order OVS with compound sentence and free order is SOV


But what is a word? Couldn't we say that this sentence is composed of several word, except the fact that they are written without spaces between them?


first is Sentence
second is morpheme with ratio
third is gloss with morpheme

if free order is

Uvanga Inuktitut naakkai uqatsiaqtuq (SOV) 5 words
I - Inuktitut -dont/no - pronunce well

Compound word/sentence
Inuktituusuungutsialaarungnanngittuaraaluuvunga (OVS) 1 word

understand?
[flag]en-ca[/flag][flag]sgn[/flag][flag]iu[/flag][flag]kl[/flag][flag]ale[/flag]
[flag]qu[/flag][flag]tr[/flag][flag]yrk[/flag][flag]evn[/flag][flag]ckt[/flag][flag]itl[/flag]

[̲̅̅N̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅b̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅d̲̅][̲̅̅y̲̅] [̲̅̅K̲̅][̲̅̅n̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅w̲̅][̲̅̅s̲̅][̲̅̅.̲̅] [̲̅̅L̲̅][̲̅̅i̲̅][̲̅̅f̲̅][̲̅̅e̲̅] [̲̅̅A̲̅][̲̅̅s̲̅] [̲̅̅T̲̅][̲̅̅h̲̅][̲̅̅e̲̅][̲̅̅y̲̅] [̲̅̅K̲̅][̲̅̅n̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅w̲̅] [̲̅̅I̲̅][̲̅̅t̲̅][̲̅̅.̲̅]

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Re: Native American Languages

Postby Tukkumminnguaq » 2009-02-02, 13:50

Gruszka.

You know Inuit some similar Quechua/Aymara
example

Quechua / Inuktitut
Qaqaman / Qaqqamun 'towards the cliff'
Qaqata / Qaqqaqti 'The cliff'
Qaqap / Qaqqaup 'of the cliff'
Qaqarayku / Qaqqarmat 'because of the cliff'
Qaqanku / Qaqqangit 'their cliff'
Qaqapi / Qaqqami 'at the cliff'
Qaqayki / Qaqqakkik 'your cliff'
Qaqayku / Qaqqakput 'Our cliff'
Qaqamanta (Qaqapiqta / Qaqqamin 'from the cliff'

Inuit and Samoyedic Northern Russian native) same as Quechua/Aymara
mi, ni /na / pi 'at/on/in'
mkut / mna / nta 'along/through'
-m, -p / -m, -k / -p 'of the'
ngit / ngaq / nku 'their'
min(-t) /nyad /manta, piqta 'from'

Interesting is it?
[flag]en-ca[/flag][flag]sgn[/flag][flag]iu[/flag][flag]kl[/flag][flag]ale[/flag]
[flag]qu[/flag][flag]tr[/flag][flag]yrk[/flag][flag]evn[/flag][flag]ckt[/flag][flag]itl[/flag]

[̲̅̅N̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅b̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅d̲̅][̲̅̅y̲̅] [̲̅̅K̲̅][̲̅̅n̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅w̲̅][̲̅̅s̲̅][̲̅̅.̲̅] [̲̅̅L̲̅][̲̅̅i̲̅][̲̅̅f̲̅][̲̅̅e̲̅] [̲̅̅A̲̅][̲̅̅s̲̅] [̲̅̅T̲̅][̲̅̅h̲̅][̲̅̅e̲̅][̲̅̅y̲̅] [̲̅̅K̲̅][̲̅̅n̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅w̲̅] [̲̅̅I̲̅][̲̅̅t̲̅][̲̅̅.̲̅]

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Re: Native American Languages

Postby Quetzalcoatl » 2009-02-02, 14:37

Yeah, that's really weird... I mean Quechua is spoken in South America and Inuit somewhere far in the north... It really looks like as if they were very related to each other...

(BTW am I the only person here, who pronounces "Quechua" with an inital ejective " k' " or "q' " instead of "kw" or just "k"?... I don't know if my pronunciation is correct, but I am just so proud of me, that I, coming from Central Europe, can pronounce ejectives... :mrgreen: )

edit:

I looked at Wikipedia, [k'e.tSwa] seems to be wrong, [qeS.wa] seems to be better...


Seems to be a typical disease of linguists that they always try to pronounce things over-correctly, so that the pronunciation get's even worse than if they just pronounced it like they would read the word in their own native tongue... 8-)

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Re: Native American Languages

Postby Tukkumminnguaq » 2009-02-02, 15:13

Gruszka wrote:Yeah, that's really weird... I mean Quechua is spoken in South America and Inuit somewhere far in the north... It really looks like as if they were very related to each other...

(BTW am I the only person here, who pronounces "Quechua" with an inital ejective " k' " or "q' " instead of "kw" or just "k"?... I don't know if my pronunciation is correct, but I am just so proud of me, that I, coming from Central Europe, can pronounce ejectives... :mrgreen: )

edit:

I looked at Wikipedia, [k'e.tSwa] seems to be wrong, [qeS.wa] seems to be better...


Seems to be a typical disease of linguists that they always try to pronounce things over-correctly, so that the pronunciation get's even worse than if they just pronounced it like they would read the word in their own native tongue... 8-)


hehe yeah it is weird Inuit and Quechua are looks very closely related, because it was happen in bering strait they migrated to North/South America from East Asia in some 12 thousand years ago.
My theory If Inuit and Quechua were each other they communicated in bering and if earthquake make them separated went to north and south. and now Quechua and Inuit some lost words or different words or lose memories their origin word.

Oh yeah....Quechua's /q/ like you have uvular voiceless and back choke with breathing the nose
and vibrating. you could try pronunciation german 'bach' as q or you could listen Arabic's sounds /q/

yeah wikipeida are wrong. not k. it just like /krr/ or /rk/

and i try find Quechua youtube but cant find them and you can hear inuktitut has q uvular same quechua q

here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kxdqjn1s ... C2&index=0
[flag]en-ca[/flag][flag]sgn[/flag][flag]iu[/flag][flag]kl[/flag][flag]ale[/flag]
[flag]qu[/flag][flag]tr[/flag][flag]yrk[/flag][flag]evn[/flag][flag]ckt[/flag][flag]itl[/flag]

[̲̅̅N̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅b̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅d̲̅][̲̅̅y̲̅] [̲̅̅K̲̅][̲̅̅n̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅w̲̅][̲̅̅s̲̅][̲̅̅.̲̅] [̲̅̅L̲̅][̲̅̅i̲̅][̲̅̅f̲̅][̲̅̅e̲̅] [̲̅̅A̲̅][̲̅̅s̲̅] [̲̅̅T̲̅][̲̅̅h̲̅][̲̅̅e̲̅][̲̅̅y̲̅] [̲̅̅K̲̅][̲̅̅n̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅w̲̅] [̲̅̅I̲̅][̲̅̅t̲̅][̲̅̅.̲̅]

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Re: Native American Languages

Postby Formiko » 2009-02-02, 17:17

Gruszka wrote:Yeah, that's really weird... I mean Quechua is spoken in South America and Inuit somewhere far in the north... It really looks like as if they were very related to each other...

(BTW am I the only person here, who pronounces "Quechua" with an inital ejective " k' " or "q' " instead of "kw" or just "k"?... I don't know if my pronunciation is correct, but I am just so proud of me, that I, coming from Central Europe, can pronounce ejectives... :mrgreen: )

edit:

I looked at Wikipedia, [k'e.tSwa] seems to be wrong, [qeS.wa] seems to be better...


Seems to be a typical disease of linguists that they always try to pronounce things over-correctly, so that the pronunciation get's even worse than if they just pronounced it like they would read the word in their own native tongue... 8-)


Actually, Mapuzungan is MORE rigorous, as is Guaraní, the national language of Paraguay.
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Re: Native American Languages

Postby Tukkumminnguaq » 2009-02-02, 18:16

Formiko wrote:
Gruszka wrote:Yeah, that's really weird... I mean Quechua is spoken in South America and Inuit somewhere far in the north... It really looks like as if they were very related to each other...

(BTW am I the only person here, who pronounces "Quechua" with an inital ejective " k' " or "q' " instead of "kw" or just "k"?... I don't know if my pronunciation is correct, but I am just so proud of me, that I, coming from Central Europe, can pronounce ejectives... :mrgreen: )

edit:

I looked at Wikipedia, [k'e.tSwa] seems to be wrong, [qeS.wa] seems to be better...


Seems to be a typical disease of linguists that they always try to pronounce things over-correctly, so that the pronunciation get's even worse than if they just pronounced it like they would read the word in their own native tongue... 8-)


Actually, Mapuzungan is MORE rigorous, as is Guaraní, the national language of Paraguay.


How do you know Mapudungan is more rigorous? what its like? can you example what they rigorous for? i read wikipeida they said Mapuzungan like Inuktitut? how they comparison? for words or something?....Is Mapudungan related Quechua?
[flag]en-ca[/flag][flag]sgn[/flag][flag]iu[/flag][flag]kl[/flag][flag]ale[/flag]
[flag]qu[/flag][flag]tr[/flag][flag]yrk[/flag][flag]evn[/flag][flag]ckt[/flag][flag]itl[/flag]

[̲̅̅N̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅b̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅d̲̅][̲̅̅y̲̅] [̲̅̅K̲̅][̲̅̅n̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅w̲̅][̲̅̅s̲̅][̲̅̅.̲̅] [̲̅̅L̲̅][̲̅̅i̲̅][̲̅̅f̲̅][̲̅̅e̲̅] [̲̅̅A̲̅][̲̅̅s̲̅] [̲̅̅T̲̅][̲̅̅h̲̅][̲̅̅e̲̅][̲̅̅y̲̅] [̲̅̅K̲̅][̲̅̅n̲̅][̲̅̅o̲̅][̲̅̅w̲̅] [̲̅̅I̲̅][̲̅̅t̲̅][̲̅̅.̲̅]

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Re: Native American Languages

Postby Formiko » 2009-02-02, 18:51

Amaqqut wrote:
How do you know Mapudungan is more rigorous? what its like? can you example what they rigorous for? i read wikipeida they said Mapuzungan like Inuktitut? how they comparison? for words or something?....Is Mapudungan related Quechua?


Mapuche (Mapudungan) is an Araucanian language, about as far from Inuit as Swahili. It's spoken in Chile and Argentina. A lot of software and newspapers are written in it.
Mapuche is NOT related to Quechua, neither is Guaraní. But Aymará is related to Quechua.
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Re: Native American Languages

Postby ILuvEire » 2009-02-03, 0:34

Gruszka wrote:I looked at Wikipedia, [k'e.tSwa] seems to be wrong, [qeS.wa] seems to be better...


Seems to be a typical disease of linguists that they always try to pronounce things over-correctly, so that the pronunciation get's even worse than if they just pronounced it like they would read the word in their own native tongue... 8-)


[/quote]

I pronounce it [keʃwa] if I'm trying to be accurate, but in my head it will always be [kweɪtʃu̯a]. Just like Nahuatl, I'll always say [nawat‿ɬ], in my head I'll say [nɑhuːɑtəɫ]
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matthew19
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Re: Native American Languages

Postby matthew19 » 2019-04-26, 12:15

Navajo is the most widely spoken Native American language in the US. And many native american tribes care a lot about preserving their languages and have organizations dedicated to it.


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