Wanderlust support group 5

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby Car » 2020-11-05, 15:29

Thanks again!
Please correct my mistakes!

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby Yasna » 2020-11-10, 18:49

I've been spending way too much time "dabbling" in Swedish. There are much more important languages I should be concentrating on. Self-control!
Ein Buch muß die Axt sein für das gefrorene Meer in uns. - Kafka

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby Allekanger » 2020-11-10, 20:37

Yasna wrote:Swedish. There are much more important languages

:shock: :shock: *super offended*


I want Spanish. I wanna be fluent in using the past forms of verbs. Also Russian, any verb forms.
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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby Iván » 2020-11-14, 11:28

Italian, learning it since July.
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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby Antea » 2020-11-14, 13:49

Georgian, I don't have any idea why.

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby vijayjohn » 2020-11-23, 2:21

eskandar wrote:Yeah Persian grammar is fairly similar to that of Romance languages

Do you think it's more similar to Romance languages than to other European languages, such as English? :hmm:
Allekanger wrote:
Yasna wrote:Swedish. There are much more important languages

:shock: :shock: *super offended*


I want Spanish. I wanna be fluent in using the past forms of verbs. Also Russian, any verb forms.

I like how you were super offended and then said you were wanderlusting for two languages that have far more speakers. :lol:

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby Allekanger » 2020-11-23, 17:59

vijayjohn wrote:I like how you were super offended and then said you were wanderlusting for two languages that have far more speakers. :lol:

Haha, yay, I'm glad I managed to convey the irony in that! :D

Wasn't actually offended though, was just playing :mrgreen: In fact, I kinda agree ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby eskandar » 2020-11-23, 20:35

vijayjohn wrote:
eskandar wrote:Yeah Persian grammar is fairly similar to that of Romance languages

Do you think it's more similar to Romance languages than to other European languages, such as English? :hmm:

I think Persian is more similar to Romance languages than to English in its verbal morphology (is that the right term?) and to some degree phonology (limited vowel inventory, mostly monophthongs, when compared with English). One area where Persian is more similar to English than to Romance would be the lack of grammatical gender. What do you think?
Please correct my mistakes in any language.

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby vijayjohn » 2020-11-24, 1:34

Allekanger wrote:Wasn't actually offended though, was just playing :mrgreen:¯

I figured as much, but I enjoyed the joke. :mrgreen:
eskandar wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:
eskandar wrote:Yeah Persian grammar is fairly similar to that of Romance languages

Do you think it's more similar to Romance languages than to other European languages, such as English? :hmm:

I think Persian is more similar to Romance languages than to English in its verbal morphology (is that the right term?) and to some degree phonology (limited vowel inventory, mostly monophthongs, when compared with English). One area where Persian is more similar to English than to Romance would be the lack of grammatical gender. What do you think?

I think Persian is a pretty generic Indo-European language and English is just bizarre in some ways. :lol: The similarity with other Indo-European languages (combined with the high volume of resources for learning an awful lot of those languages) is a big part of the reason why it's so much easier for me to pick up Persian than it is to pick up Arabic. It's also why I wouldn't have thought to compare it to any particular (Western European :P) branch of Indo-European, though.

(But of course, knowing Turkish and Urdu doesn't hurt. :whistle: Knowing Arabic and even Swahili has also proved useful for the purpose of learning Persian at times).
Last edited by vijayjohn on 2020-11-24, 18:45, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby linguoboy » 2020-11-24, 17:52

eskandar wrote:I think Persian is more similar to Romance languages than to English in its verbal morphology (is that the right term?)

I would say in its inflectional verbal morphology. Derivationally, I find it way more similar to English with the heavily reliance on phrasal verbs where Romance languages overwhelmingly prefer prefixing and suffixing. (This, in turn, leads to parallels in the syntax as well.)
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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby Yasna » 2020-12-05, 15:43

Mongolian. There's quite a few Mongolian place names in China, even outside of Inner Mongolia, and every mention of them piques my interest in the language.
Ein Buch muß die Axt sein für das gefrorene Meer in uns. - Kafka

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-12-05, 18:18

Yasna wrote:Mongolian. There's quite a few Mongolian place names in China, even outside of Inner Mongolia, and every mention of them piques my interest in the language.

I've had enough wanderlusts for Mongolian over the years that I have a stack of books about the language somewhere, although I've never really studied them beyond browsing through the pages to get a general feel for the language. Just ended up reading books in English about Mongolian culture, which is interesting too, and from there I usually branch out westward into Central Asian (so I also have a similar stack of unfinished language books somewhere for Uzbek, Kyrgyz, Kazakh and so on and some already-read ones in English about those places). :mrgreen:
Current wanderlust is Latvian.

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby Yasna » 2020-12-08, 18:01

Linguaphile wrote:I've had enough wanderlusts for Mongolian over the years that I have a stack of books about the language somewhere, although I've never really studied them beyond browsing through the pages to get a general feel for the language.

Do you plan to seriously study the language one day?
Ein Buch muß die Axt sein für das gefrorene Meer in uns. - Kafka

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-12-08, 18:30

Yasna wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:I've had enough wanderlusts for Mongolian over the years that I have a stack of books about the language somewhere, although I've never really studied them beyond browsing through the pages to get a general feel for the language.

Do you plan to seriously study the language one day?

I'd like to (that's why I actually bought books), but I'm not sure that I'll have time, or any practical purpose to justify spending time on it, in the foreseeable future. Instead I've been sticking to developing my skills in languages I've already started learning because I find I can do that better in short spurts of time (which is all I have lately). Starting a new language is more time-consuming for me and more of a long-term commitment. :mrgreen:

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby awrui » 2020-12-08, 21:29

Linguaphile wrote:
Yasna wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:I've had enough wanderlusts for Mongolian over the years that I have a stack of books about the language somewhere, although I've never really studied them beyond browsing through the pages to get a general feel for the language.

Do you plan to seriously study the language one day?

I'd like to (that's why I actually bought books), but I'm not sure that I'll have time, or any practical purpose to justify spending time on it, in the foreseeable future. Instead I've been sticking to developing my skills in languages I've already started learning because I find I can do that better in short spurts of time (which is all I have lately). Starting a new language is more time-consuming for me and more of a long-term commitment. :mrgreen:


I'm in the exact same situation! I have a level in my bookshelf dedicated to Mongolian, but somehow the books never make it to my bedroom...

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby vijayjohn » 2020-12-10, 2:46

I personally found it more intriguing how many terms in Mongolian come straight from northern Mandarin Chinese, especially terms for common dishes like buuz (steamed dumplings, from 包子) and khushuur (deep-fried dumplings or cheburek or basically big samosas, from 火烧儿). I had a difficult time making sense of the conflicting accounts of what Mongolian cuisine was like until a few days ago, when I discovered Artger:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Z-nk_Ub2EQ
linguoboy wrote:
eskandar wrote:I think Persian is more similar to Romance languages than to English in its verbal morphology (is that the right term?)

I would say in its inflectional verbal morphology. Derivationally, I find it way more similar to English with the heavily reliance on phrasal verbs where Romance languages overwhelmingly prefer prefixing and suffixing. (This, in turn, leads to parallels in the syntax as well.)

What are some examples of parallels to English that you can think of?

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-12-10, 5:34

vijayjohn wrote:I personally found it more intriguing how many terms in Mongolian come straight from northern Mandarin Chinese, especially terms for common dishes like buuz (steamed dumplings, from 包子) and khushuur (deep-fried dumplings or cheburek or basically big samosas, from 火烧儿).

Both are intriguing - the Mandarin loans in Mongolian and the Mongolian placenames in China. Contact between the two languages of course goes way back. 站 is thought to be derived from Middle Mongolian ᠵᠠᠮ (modern Mongolian зам) and spread into many other languages, even travelling as far as Estonian jaam.

vijayjohn wrote:I had a difficult time making sense of the conflicting accounts of what Mongolian cuisine was like until a few days ago, when I discovered Artger

Urban Mongolian food is a bit different from traditional nomadic food, and both quite different from "Mongolian barbecue" which isn't even Mongolian. We used to have a restaurant locally that served бууз (Mongolian dumplings), цуйван (noodle stew) and sometimes тараг (yoghurt) or other Mongolian dishes, but also had the (Taiwanese-origin) enormous grill that is expected by Americanas when one mentions "Mongolian" food, even though it isn't actually Mongolian. And the restaurant in question also had Thai food. So kind of Mongolian-Taiwanese-Thai Asian fusion. :mrgreen:

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby vijayjohn » 2020-12-15, 14:50

Linguaphile wrote:Both are intriguing - the Mandarin loans in Mongolian and the Mongolian placenames in China.

I'm sure they are, but I don't know anything about the Mongolian placenames in China.
Urban Mongolian food is a bit different from traditional nomadic food, and both quite different from "Mongolian barbecue" which isn't even Mongolian. We used to have a restaurant locally that served бууз (Mongolian dumplings), цуйван (noodle stew) and sometimes тараг (yoghurt) or other Mongolian dishes, but also had the (Taiwanese-origin) enormous grill that is expected by Americanas when one mentions "Mongolian" food, even though it isn't actually Mongolian. And the restaurant in question also had Thai food. So kind of Mongolian-Taiwanese-Thai Asian fusion. :mrgreen:

Yes, but what confused me was the way that I saw Mongolian food being characterized as just meat, meat, and more meat and Vegetables Are A Rarity In This Harsh Dry Climate How Dare You Expect To See Any At All You Foreign Beach Bonfire Scum. It looks like Mongolians really do eat some vegetables fairly often, just in small quantities with lots of meat. It also confused me that the Lonely Planet Mongolian Phrasebook said something like you can't get breakfast cereal in Mongolia, yet Saveur also claims that kimchi is everywhere in Mongolia. Seeing these videos, though, it makes some more cultural sense to me.

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby OldBoring » 2020-12-15, 15:13

vijayjohn wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:Both are intriguing - the Mandarin loans in Mongolian and the Mongolian placenames in China.

I'm sure they are, but I don't know anything about the Mongolian placenames in China.
Urban Mongolian food is a bit different from traditional nomadic food, and both quite different from "Mongolian barbecue" which isn't even Mongolian. We used to have a restaurant locally that served бууз (Mongolian dumplings), цуйван (noodle stew) and sometimes тараг (yoghurt) or other Mongolian dishes, but also had the (Taiwanese-origin) enormous grill that is expected by Americanas when one mentions "Mongolian" food, even though it isn't actually Mongolian. And the restaurant in question also had Thai food. So kind of Mongolian-Taiwanese-Thai Asian fusion. :mrgreen:

Yes, but what confused me was the way that I saw Mongolian food being characterized as just meat, meat, and more meat and Vegetables Are A Rarity In This Harsh Dry Climate How Dare You Expect To See Any At All You Foreign Beach Bonfire Scum. It looks like Mongolians really do eat some vegetables fairly often, just in small quantities with lots of meat. It also confused me that the Lonely Planet Mongolian Phrasebook said something like you can't get breakfast cereal in Mongolia, yet Saveur also claims that kimchi is everywhere in Mongolia. Seeing these videos, though, it makes some more cultural sense to me.

Not even Hohtot 呼和浩特?

Is the Lonely Planet written in the 90s? A lot of things have changed.

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Re: Wanderlust support group 5

Postby Michael » 2020-12-16, 0:16

I have been re-afflicted with the wanderlust bug for Dravidian as of late, and to a lesser extent for Indo-Aryan (w/Urdu). I've amassed enough of a variety of resources for Tamil, in particular, at this point by now in my life that I now have no excuse not to seriously (re-)pursue my study of the language. I did complete a whole 25-lesson intro course some 6-7 years ago focusing on the basics of Tamil grammar, for which I did handwritten exercises in a notebook that I have so far failed to locate (I don't want to give up on finding it tho). I'm starting out by going over that particular resource all the way from the beginning. I'm looking to eventually foray into Telugu, inshAllah!

BTW, Tamil music = bae <3
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