Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

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Linguaphile
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-05-14, 22:26

(vro) iistvidäjä moderator

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-05-15, 15:32

(ca) volada An architectural element, such as a balcony or eave, which projects out from a wall without the support of a brace or bracket.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby jazyk » 2020-05-20, 17:38

(de) die Urheimat:the homeland of a proto-language. Learned from reading A Comparative Germanic Grammar.
Native: (zh) (Mandarin)
Advanced: (en) (yue) (Cantonese)
Intermediate: (ko) (de) (ja)

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-05-20, 18:42

jazyk wrote:(de) die Urheimat:the homeland of a proto-language. Learned from reading A Comparative Germanic Grammar.

We actually use the same word in English.
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Brzeczyszczykiewicz » 2020-05-27, 6:38

raíña - This one's surely more familiar to most as the Galician word for "queen", but the one I recently learned (and loved) is its homonym, which means "brief sunny interval on a rainy day".

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Brzeczyszczykiewicz » 2020-05-28, 23:57

daddy longlegs - Any of various animals with long slender legs, such as crane flies and harvestmen.

:mrgreen:

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-05-29, 15:44

Brzeczyszczykiewicz wrote: daddy longlegs - Any of various animals with long slender legs, such as crane flies and harvestmen.

And cellar spiders, which is what they refer to on the west coast of the US. It's very regional. We call crane flies "mosquito hawks" or "mayflies", by the way.
So it's true that daddy longlegs can refer to the different things you mentioned, but the word means different things to different people. To most people the word means only one of those things. We don't use them interchangeably. If someone locally said they'd seen a daddy longlegs, we'd know they meant the common local type of cellar spider, which has long angular legs and vibrates in its web when nervous. No confusion over whether they meant they'd seen a crane fly (which are very common here as well but never called a daddy longlegs) or harvestman. (Unless the speaker came from a different region and doesn't share my local dialect.)
Also, in informal speech we don't usually call spiders or insects "animals". I know, technically they are. But locally when I hear someone refer to spiders or insects as an "animal" it's almost always a translation from Spanish.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Naava » 2020-05-29, 18:54

Linguaphile wrote:And cellar spiders

What the fuck was that thing and why does it have to exist??? And why do its legs need to be so long??! I've only ever seen harvestmen and I swear they're cute compared to what ever that horrible creature lurking behind the link was! That's proper nightmare material right there!

Linguaphile wrote: and vibrates in its web when nervous

It... vibrates...?

Linguaphile wrote:We call crane flies "mosquito hawks" or "mayflies", by the way.

We call them "hankisääski" (lit. snow-on-the-ground mosquito), which seems to be same as in Meänkieli! (They're called vaaksiainen in standard Finnish; I guess it comes from vaaksa or the distance between your index or middle finger and thumb.)

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-05-29, 22:46

Naava wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:And cellar spiders

What the fuck was that thing and why does it have to exist??? And why do its legs need to be so long??! I've only ever seen harvestmen and I swear they're cute compared to what ever that horrible creature lurking behind the link was! That's proper nightmare material right there!

:rotfl: In general I don't like spiders, but I don't mind these at all. They're very common here, completely harmless and they don't run very fast. When frightened they jump up and down in their webs very quickly so that they look like they're vibrating. But that means you don't need to worry about figuring out where they've run to because they just stay in place jumping in their web. They eat other bugs, including some of the scarier spiders. Honestly, I kinda like them. When they are around I know it's not likely poisonous spiders are around too. (I'm actually not sure whether they eat the poisonous spiders or the poisonous spiders eat them. I think it can go either way. But I know it's fairly unlikely to find both kinds in the same place, so I like seeing them.)

Naava wrote:
Linguaphile wrote: and vibrates in its web when nervous

It... vibrates...?

Here's a video, but I'm not going to embed it in case you really don't want to see. :mrgreen: By the way, they aren't very large. The video describes this one as "huge" and (if you watch it) you can see that its legs are long but its body is tiny. (And you'll also see that the person who made the video isn't scared to touch it. Honestly, I wouldn't be either, and I wouldn't touch any other kind of spider, but these are okay.)
Cellar Spider video

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Yasna » 2020-05-31, 17:55

(lv) jūra sea
(lv) pils castle
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-05-31, 19:33

Yasna wrote:(lv) jūra sea
(lv) pils castle

Those were two of the first Latvian words I learned, too!

(cy) elusen alms
(kw) kynnyav autumn
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Lutrinae » 2020-05-31, 20:43

Dormouse559 wrote:(fr)

palétuvier nm - mangrove


This one is so tricky, in English can mangrove refers to both the trees/shrubs and the place where they grow?

In French they are distincts as: une forêt de palétuvier = une mangrove


(en) Lithe - Mild
Thanks for any correction :)

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby linguoboy » 2020-05-31, 21:22

Lutrinae wrote:This one is so tricky, in English can mangrove refers to both the trees/shrubs and the place where they grow?

I've never heard that usage and the AHD and the M-W don't recognise it.

Lutrinae wrote:(en) Lithe - Mild

That's an obsolete meaning.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Yasna » 2020-05-31, 22:22

linguoboy wrote:Those were two of the first Latvian words I learned, too!

"Pils" immediately had me wondering about a connection to Pilsner and Pilsen, but apparently the etymology of Pilsen is unknown.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Brzeczyszczykiewicz » 2020-06-01, 6:29

linguoboy wrote:
Lutrinae wrote:(en) Lithe - Mild

That's an obsolete meaning.


Obsolete or not, I've always really loved that one!

And according to the old faithful Chambers, it has a homonym, a verb, obsolete, as well, which means "to listen".

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Lutrinae » 2020-06-01, 9:40

linguoboy wrote:
Lutrinae wrote:This one is so tricky, in English can mangrove refers to both the trees/shrubs and the place where they grow?

I've never heard that usage and the AHD and the M-W don't recognise it.



Which usage, for the area or for the shrubs?

And what do you use instead?

linguoboy wrote:
Lutrinae wrote:(en) Lithe - Mild

That's an obsolete meaning.


:( It sounded so nice
Thanks for any correction :)

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-06-01, 14:48

linguoboy wrote:
Lutrinae wrote:This one is so tricky, in English can mangrove refers to both the trees/shrubs and the place where they grow?

I've never heard that usage and the AHD and the M-W don't recognise it.

According to many dictionaries mangrove on its own is supposed to refer to the trees and not to the place where they grow (habitat), but I've heard it used both ways. The place where they grow is called a mangrove swamp or mangrove forest (or mangal), but the word mangrove on its own is supposed to refer to the plants.

But, some dictionaries have it the other way too:
Lexico.com wrote:1. A tree or shrub that grows in chiefly tropical coastal swamps that are flooded at high tide. Mangroves typically have numerous tangled roots above ground and form dense thickets.
1.1 A tidal swamp that is dominated by mangroves and associated vegetation.

Wiktionary wrote:1. Any of various tropical evergreen trees or shrubs that grow in shallow coastal water.
2. A habitat with such plants; mangrove forest; mangrove swamp.
3. Plants of the Rhizophoraceae family.
4. Trees of the genus Rhizophora.


I found this site which explains common usage fairly well:
Florida Museum wrote:The term “mangrove” does not refer to a specific taxonomic group of species, but to all halophytic (plants growing in saline soils) species of tropical trees and shrubs. This catchall, diverse group includes 12 families and more than 50 species. Although unrelated, all are adapted to life in wet soils, saline habitats, and periodic tidal submergence.

Another use of the term “mangrove” includes the entire plant community including the individual mangrove species. Terms such as tidal forest, tidal swamp forest, mangrove community, mangrove forest, mangal, and mangrove swamp are synonymous with “mangrove”.

Brzeczyszczykiewicz

Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Brzeczyszczykiewicz » 2020-06-03, 6:16

kialio - rain that falls at bedtime :)

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Brzeczyszczykiewicz » 2020-06-06, 22:14

הרי־חושך ("haréi chóshech" both ch's are pronounced as in Scottish "loch") This one originally referred to the "dark mountains", the legendary mountains of the Talmud sages' stories, which were apparently somewhere between Asia and Africa, but nowadays it may also be used to talk about any place that's very far away. :silly:

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt 2

Postby Brzeczyszczykiewicz » 2020-06-08, 3:09

מחשוף (machsóf) - 1. (Geol.) An exposed rocky formation; 2. Cleavage, decolletage. 8-)


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