The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Linguaphile » 2019-12-28, 21:25

subintelligitur

Synalepha

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Synalepha » 2020-01-02, 0:48

triolagnia - cuckoldry

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2020-01-07, 16:28

knotting a feature of canine intercourse; also, a genre of fanfic
supinate (of the foot) to turn so that weight is borne on the outside of the foot; to underpronate
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Dormouse559 » 2020-01-12, 5:12

Reading Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen, so I'm learning the finer points of carriage nomenclature:

(en)
curricle - a two-wheeled chariot pulled by a pair of carefully matched horses
barouche, spelled barouché in the book - a four-wheeled carriage pulled by two horses
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-01-15, 6:18

(en) obstreperous

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Dormouse559 » 2020-01-25, 5:37

straiten v - narrow; restrict (financially)

An article in my local paper talked about the straitened environment for arts while talking about a theater piece produced on a low budget.
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Ciarán12

Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Ciarán12 » 2020-01-25, 8:10

Dormouse559 wrote:straiten v - narrow; restrict (financially)

An article in my local paper talked about the straitened environment for arts while talking about a theater piece produced on a low budget.


I wonder if this is in someway related to the phrase "in dire straits"... 🤔

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-01-25, 16:27

(en) reify to make something abstract more concrete or real

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Dormouse559 » 2020-01-25, 17:31

Ciarán12 wrote:
Dormouse559 wrote:straiten v - narrow; restrict (financially)

An article in my local paper talked about the straitened environment for arts while talking about a theater piece produced on a low budget.


I wonder if this is in someway related to the phrase "in dire straits"... 🤔

It is. "Straiten" and the noun "strait" both come from the archaic adjective "strait", which meant "narrow" or "tight" (cf. "straitjacket"). And "strait" was borrowed from Old French estreit (Modern étroit).
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Ciarán12 » 2020-01-25, 17:48

Dormouse559 wrote:It is. "Straiten" and the noun "strait" both come from the archaic adjective "strait", which meant "narrow" or "tight" (cf. "straitjacket"). And "strait" was borrowed from Old French estreit (Modern étroit).


I know the word as a noun referring to a narrow stretch of sea, e.g. the Straits of Magellan, but I had never thought to connect that to the "straits" in "in dire straits". Now that I think about it, the word for "narrow" or "tight" in Portuguese is "estreito".

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2020-01-27, 14:15

hennin
dottle
avulsion
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Synalepha » 2020-01-30, 20:52

ctonio - underground (adj.)

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2020-02-04, 21:04

Lipizzan (I always knew this breed as Lipizzaner)
yoked heavily muscled
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby razlem » 2020-02-07, 0:53

gourmandise (-/ajz/)- eat good food, especially to excess
gourmandise (-/i:z/)- gluttony

and by extension...

gourmand - A person given to excess in the consumption of food and drink; a greedy or ravenous eater
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Gormur » 2020-02-08, 7:53

English: canard
Norwegian: dokk
Eigi gegnir þat at segja at bók nøkkur er hreinferðug eðr ønnur spelluð því at vandliga ok dáliga eru bœkr ritnar ok annat kunnum vér eigi um þœr at dœma

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2020-02-10, 22:56

myrobalan
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Dormouse559 » 2020-02-11, 7:22

fatless sponge - a cake made without butter, and with eggs and sugar whisked
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby linguoboy » 2020-02-12, 15:09

lour scowl; be gloomy or threatening (of weather)
virgate one fourth of a hide
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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Gormur » 2020-02-15, 12:26

English: carpark
Actually I already knew this word. However I didn't realize it refers exclusively to a parking lot; not parking garage as well. I still don't know what that's called :hmm:

Norwegian: sipe
I hadn't seen this word much, so could only guess its meaning. It's closer to sutre (bemoan) than gråte (cry)
Eigi gegnir þat at segja at bók nøkkur er hreinferðug eðr ønnur spelluð því at vandliga ok dáliga eru bœkr ritnar ok annat kunnum vér eigi um þœr at dœma

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Re: The last word of your mother tongue you have learnt ?

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-02-15, 17:47

Gormur wrote:English: carpark
Actually I already knew this word. However I didn't realize it refers exclusively to a parking lot; not parking garage as well. I still don't know what that's called :hmm:


For parking garage, I usually say parking garage. But:
from Merriam-Webster
Definition of car park
chiefly British

: a lot or garage for parking

Here (Collins COBUILD) it says:
also carpark
A car park is an area or building where people can leave their cars.
[British]
REGIONAL NOTE:
in AM, use parking lot


Both definitions mention garages or buildings; it can be used for parking garages.

Google image results for carpark and car park give an idea of the range of uses and which seem more common. (Interestingly, Google offered me suggestions of "related search" that included both "outdoor carpark" and "basement carpark" [And, for some reason, "cartoon carpark"]).

In my own dialect I'd say parking lot for the outdoor kind and parking garage for the underground or multi-story building kind, and avoid carpark / car park as the term isn't that common here. It would be understood, but as for whether it would be understood as a parking lot or parking garage, I think most people locally would think of it as a parking garage (in part just because they, like the term itself, aren't all that common here; the assumption would probably be that if you aren't using the word "parking lot" you're probably referring to something that is different from an outdoor parking lot, therefore probably a parking garage).
There's also carport for the open-air kind with a roof over it, usually for a single car or for a a single (or double) row of cars, such as an apartment building.


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