Uralic Music Thread

Linguaphile
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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby Linguaphile » 2019-08-06, 0:07

Nightwish - Kuolema Tekee Taiteilijan (Finnish)
Lyrics and translation are in the video.
"...anna minun tulla siksi, miksi lapseni minua luulee." Let me become what my child thinks I am!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z94ip-1_khY

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby Linguaphile » 2019-11-25, 5:30

Tuļļi lum - Astā veļ (Step up, brother), a Livonian marriage song
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xW8FAn9vmLE

Lyrics:
► Show Spoiler


Translation:
► Show Spoiler

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby h34 » 2020-02-02, 20:58

Three Mari songs performed by Шижäт Bäл / Šižät Väl. I think the language is Hill Mari but I haven't found any more details about the songs yet.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sW89bhGzKsw
Thanks for any corrections!

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby Naava » 2020-04-06, 16:38

This has been playing in my head nonstop so I hope you enjoy it too.

Language: Southern/capital area spoken Finnish
https://youtu.be/HrEkQUWkI2M
Translation:
► Show Spoiler

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-04-16, 20:22

Kadonu Loru - Kven Finnish
The days of the week and sausage-making! :mrgreen:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4KeIbGOnXw
Maanantaina makkarat vallaat
Tiistaina tikhuun tukkiit
Keskiviikkona keittäät
Tuorestaina tungan tukkiit
Perjantaina perheele jakkaat
Lauantaina liemen lakkiit
ja Sunnuntaina suun pyhkiit

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby Naava » 2020-04-16, 21:20

Linguaphile wrote:Kadonu Loru - Kven Finnish
The days of the week and sausage-making! :mrgreen:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4KeIbGOnXw
Maanantaina makkarat vallaat
Tiistaina tikhuun tukkiit
Keskiviikkona keittäät
Tuorestaina tungan tukkiit
Perjantaina perheele jakkaat
Lauantaina liemen lakkiit
ja Sunnuntaina suun pyhkiit

Oh! I know this loru! My mum taught it to me when I was a kid, but I've never heard it sung before. Thanks for the video! :D

The poem how I learnt it:

Maanantaina makkarat tehtiin,
tiistaina tikut vuoltiin,
keskiviikkona keitto keitettiin,
torstaina tupaan kannettiin,
perjantaina perheelle annettiin,
lauantaina liemi latkittiin,
sunnuntaina suu pyyhittiin.

On Monday, the sausages were made
On Tuesday, the sticks were carved
On Wednesday, the soup was cooked
On Thursday, it was carried in the house
On Friday, it was given to the family
On Saturday, the broth was slurped
On Sunday, mouths were wiped

I was always so sorry for the family because they got nothing to eat until Friday.

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-04-17, 5:07

Naava wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:Kadonu Loru - Kven Finnish
The days of the week and sausage-making! :mrgreen:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4KeIbGOnXw
Maanantaina makkarat vallaat
Tiistaina tikhuun tukkiit
Keskiviikkona keittäät
Tuorestaina tungan tukkiit
Perjantaina perheele jakkaat
Lauantaina liemen lakkiit
ja Sunnuntaina suun pyhkiit

Oh! I know this loru! My mum taught it to me when I was a kid, but I've never heard it sung before. Thanks for the video! :D

The poem how I learnt it:

Maanantaina makkarat tehtiin,
tiistaina tikut vuoltiin,
keskiviikkona keitto keitettiin,
torstaina tupaan kannettiin,
perjantaina perheelle annettiin,
lauantaina liemi latkittiin,
sunnuntaina suu pyyhittiin.

On Monday, the sausages were made
On Tuesday, the sticks were carved
On Wednesday, the soup was cooked
On Thursday, it was carried in the house
On Friday, it was given to the family
On Saturday, the broth was slurped
On Sunday, mouths were wiped

Cool! When I posted it I wondered if it was a Kven-specific song or general Finnish one. It sounded like the type of song that would have variations in lots of regions, I guess. Thanks for posting the version you know!

Naava wrote:I was always so sorry for the family because they got nothing to eat until Friday.

Yeah, and they get it on Friday, but don't eat the broth until Saturday. :doggy: Life was just slower-paced back then, I guess? :silly:

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby Naava » 2020-04-20, 21:28

I don't know where this suddenly came to my mind from, but let me share it to you too! The kid is so cute!

(Language: Finnish)
https://youtu.be/-qKD9XDYzvs
Lyrics:
► Show Spoiler

Translation:
► Show Spoiler


The same song in English:
https://youtu.be/_FmryiUgQrk
The lyrics are surprisingly close in Finnish, but not quite the same. :)

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-05-03, 22:46

Muzik-aldoine project - Kirdeine (The Letter) in Veps
This song starts out as a letter from a daughter to her mother and it is about remembering the place she is from. The letter brings tears and brings memories back to life. I don't understand all of it but the refrain says "Nece om minu pert’" (this is my house), she remembers the dog, the water from the spring, and so on. "Kaikele tervehta, kaikele muhota" - greet everyone, smile to everyone.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIpogYCrYMo

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby Naava » 2020-05-14, 17:31

Idk I like the lyrics. Enjoy.

(Language: Finnish again)
https://youtu.be/R9Xoulxa59Q
Lyrics:
► Show Spoiler

Translation (copied from here):
► Show Spoiler

h34
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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby h34 » 2020-09-18, 16:19

An Erzya song called Сёксь (Śokś, 'autumn'). The singer's name is Панишень Аня / Аня Панишева.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvLnGWPRiUg

► Show Spoiler
Thanks for any corrections!

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby hajoseszter » 2020-11-05, 10:32

Linguaphile wrote:Suõmmkar (Anna Lumikivi and Hanna-Maaria Kiprianoff) - Duna Duna, Skolt Saami (smi-sms)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErpbEmlD6KE

► Show Spoiler

► Show Spoiler


Second video of the same song, this time sung by Lilja Ljetoff and Jasmin Semenoff:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SexMn2jN8TY


Dear Linguaphile,

I'm just wondering if there's missing a word (or anything :D) in the last but one line?
Di pue'rabi mona ??? vue'lǧǧadama
Thank you!

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby hajoseszter » 2020-11-05, 10:51

Also I would like to request lyrics-translation of this song (with all voice pronounced, I would sing it), if possible: Mâiʹd kuulak niõđ ju určči juuǥǥudeja (What Are You Youngsters Running For)
Thank you!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Z6mE52HGhw

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby hajoseszter » 2020-11-05, 11:09

Linguaphile wrote:Suur Tamm ("The Big Oak") sung by Marika Ahven, Kadri Mägi, Ülle Paltser & Helen Kõmmus
Estonian
The introduction says that this song is known in Estonia and Karelia, and is more than 2000 years old. The song is related to courting and marriage. In the song an oak tree is found in the sea and it is taken to several different places to grow (father's yard, mother's yard, outside sister's door, etc), but it refuses to grow until it is taken to the groom. Then it grows so tall that it reaches the clouds. It is cut down, and the wood is used to make many things, especially things for the wedding: a chest for the bride's clothes, pews and doors for the church, wood for the pipe organ, etc.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwvpgB9d0qo

Lyrics:
► Show Spoiler



Wow, this one is so lovely! Could you also add English translation?

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby hajoseszter » 2020-11-05, 12:01

Linguaphile wrote:Pääsköilintu, päivöilintu, Ingrian (Izhorian) folksong sung by Talomerkit. Part of a creation story shared by Finnish, Estonian, Votic and Ingrian folklore.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPjdL6oEJFQ

Lyrics:
► Show Spoiler

Translation:
► Show Spoiler



Dear Linguaphile,

I love this so so much, thank you for adding! <3
I've checked the lyrics and it seem to me that the last line is missing, could you complete it? (And there's one line twice: Mätästä munijaksee). Maybe it's also missing from the translation.
How sould this word "Lentteeli" pronounced?

Eszter

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-11-06, 0:34

hajoseszter wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:Suur Tamm ("The Big Oak") sung by Marika Ahven, Kadri Mägi, Ülle Paltser & Helen Kõmmus
Estonian
The introduction says that this song is known in Estonia and Karelia, and is more than 2000 years old. The song is related to courting and marriage. In the song an oak tree is found in the sea and it is taken to several different places to grow (father's yard, mother's yard, outside sister's door, etc), but it refuses to grow until it is taken to the groom. Then it grows so tall that it reaches the clouds. It is cut down, and the wood is used to make many things, especially things for the wedding: a chest for the bride's clothes, pews and doors for the church, wood for the pipe organ, etc.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwvpgB9d0qo

Lyrics:
► Show Spoiler



Wow, this one is so lovely! Could you also add English translation?


Again... some archaic and poetic language, so a bit difficult to translate precisely, but:

The intro on-screen says: "Suur tamm" ("The Big Oak") is a story of mainly Estonian and Karelian origin, which is more than 2000 years old. It is known all over Estonia, less so in the southeast. In more recent times the song "Suur tamm" is often performed together with other songs and developed into a maiden's courtship fantasy. The content of the song is used in Kalevipoeg and Kalevala. The general theme of Suur Tamm in Estonia is an oak found in the sea or in the forest by a maiden or maidens, which struggles to survive in relatives' gardens but in the suitor's garden grows into a giant tree that starts to eclipse the sky. From the tree felled by supernatural lumberjack miraculous things are prepared, holy items needed for wedding rituals.

Dear sisters, my dears,
Let's go to sweep the sea,
To sweep from under the sea.
What did I find by sweeping?
I found an oak by sweeping.

I took the oak onto my back,
I took it to father's garden.
Grow, oak, reach, oak,
Grow, oak, into the sky,
Slip your branches into the clouds.
The oak didn't grow, the oak didn't reach,
The oak didn't grow into the sky,
The branches didn't slip into the clouds.

I took the oak onto my back,
I took it to mother's garden.
Grow, oak, reach, oak,
Slip your branches into the clouds.
The oak didn't grow, the oak didn't reach,
The branches didn't slip into the clouds.

I took the oak onto my back,
I took it to my sister's door.
Grow, oak, reach, oak,
Slip your branches into the clouds.
The oak didn't grow, the oak didn't reach,
The branches didn't slip into the clouds.
The oak didn't grow, the oak didn't reach,
The branches didn't drive the clouds.

I took the oak onto my back,
I took it to the groom's door.
Grow, oak, reach, oak,
Slip your branches into the clouds.
The oak grew, the oak reached,
The branches slipped into the clouds.

Come together, young men!
We will ponder
What will become of this oak.
The roots went to God,
The middle became church pews,
The treetop became a children's songboard,
The branches became an organ board.

What what left was little chips,
From which the maiden got a chest.
It screeched when it was closed,
It sang when it was opened.
It screeched like a church door,
It sang like a boat hatch.

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-11-06, 3:06

hajoseszter wrote:I love this so so much, thank you for adding! <3
I've checked the lyrics and it seem to me that the last line is missing, could you complete it? (And there's one line twice: Mätästä munijaksee). Maybe it's also missing from the translation.

I'm honestly not sure about the missing line. I kind of remember that when I posted it, I tried to figure that one out and couldn't, and just left it off. :silly: The missing line is not part of the translation either, because the translation was mine and I didn't know what that line said.
But I have heard other versions of this song that leave it off on purpose, so for singing it yourself, you could do that too. It can be a "complete song" without it. Or you could repeat the beginning lines - Pääskölintu, päivöilintu, too ihhaala ilmoilint' - at the end or just "pääskölintu, päivöilintu" if it feels incomplete. I have heard singers do that with other songs. I'm not positive I've heard that done with Ingrian songs, and not with this song, but I've heard it done with songs in related languages that have a similar singing tradition. By the way, one thing about this tradition of songs in variations of trochaic tetrameter that Finnish, Estonian, Võro, Ingrian and Votic all share - traditionally they are sung from memory and variation is fine, as is melding lines from various songs into one. Each singer makes it their own based on how they remember it and what they feel like singing.
That flexibility is one reason for the type of repetition in Estonian songs that I mentioned in my post in the Estonian forum earlier today, and that you hear in the song Suur Tamm above: a lead singer sings a line the way they want it sung, and the other singer(s) repeat it based on the lead singer's cue. They don't have the precise lyrics memorized beforehand because they must follow the lead singer's lead, but they know the songs well enough that they can join in at the end of the lead singer's line, before that line is finished, because by that point they know what the lead singer is going to say - either from having heard the line before or from alliterative cues and context (or they join just for the last syllable and have figured it out from hearing the beginning of the word). So the lead singer determines on the spot which lines to sing and when and they follow along.

For the Skolt Saami songs, I will try to see what I can find, but I don't know that language as well. I don't even remember how I managed to post the lyrics; my knowledge of the language isn't really good enough to transcribe it by ear. I think I must have found the lyrics written somewhere, but I don't really remember! A Google search turns up nothing except my own post. :oops: So I will try to figure out the missing word, or where I might have gotten the Skolt lyrics from, but as with the missing line in the Ingrian song, I'm not sure if I can. These aren't languages I know as well.

hajoseszter wrote:How sould this word "Lentteeli" pronounced?

/'lent:e:li/
I hear it with more of an /e/ at the end the way she says it, but as far as I know it should be /i/

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby hajoseszter » 2020-11-10, 10:13

Back to Pääsköilintu, päivöilintu, Ingrian (Izhorian) folksong sung by Talomerkit:
I checked other text versions I found and see some differencies - I put here three of them.

1. There's actually one in the video's comments (also without last line):
► Show Spoiler

2. Another one (longer):
► Show Spoiler

3. Third:
https://archive.org/details/p1suomenkan ... A4ll%C3%A4
► Show Spoiler

The differencies I see (and would like to mention - you can point out others):
(- In the lyrics you missed "i" from Pääskö(i)lintu, as I see)
- Dubble or not dubble of vowels? Why?
ihhaala - ihhala, lentteeli - lentteli, sinniisen - sinnisen, karvalliin - karvallin
- tuuca - tuutsa - tuutša - which one is better?
- viiretti - veeretti - veeritti - which one is better?
AND in the third version there's maybe the last line:
- Pääsköi tätyi itkemä[hä] - is that right? Could you translate this? (BTW I really enjoy your translation of this song, so lovely).
For that version you may see there are footnotes - maybe they can help you - could you explain me them, too?

Thank you for nice notes, makes me really love these songs, opening new dimensions.

.. a lead singer sings a line the way they want it sung, and the other singer(s) repeat it based on the lead singer's cue. They don't have the precise lyrics memorized beforehand because they must follow the lead singer's lead, but they know the songs well enough that they can join in at the end of the lead singer's line, before that line is finished, because by that point they know what the lead singer is going to say...

This part really enlightened me <3 I've met this in several nations' songs also - sometimes they join in the middle of a word (in Georgian healing songs - the choir /bani/ maybe just recognize what line is coming after hearing some syllablles of it from the soloist).

How sould this word "Lentteeli" pronounced?

I've asked it because I hear it with an "h" instead of the "n" and don't know why.

Is there any other songs on the Internet from this group? Where are they from? I could not find any information about them so far.
I also would happy to have another audios/videos of this song with longer lyrics.

Hope I've included everything and what I wrote makes sense or at least not seems to be rude. :para:

Eszter

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby awrui » 2020-11-10, 12:26

You could just try to send them a message on facebook and ask for the lyrics- they are very responsive.

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Re: Uralic Music Thread

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-11-11, 3:19

hajoseszter wrote: (- In the lyrics you missed "i" from Pääskö(i)lintu, as I see)

I'm sorry about that. It was just a typo. It should be Pääsköilintu, as the others have it (and I as also typed in the title of the song).

hajoseszter wrote:
- Dubble or not dubble of vowels? Why?
ihhaala - ihhala, lentteeli - lentteli, sinniisen - sinnisen, karvalliin - karvallin

It may be dialect differences, but I am not sure either.

hajoseszter wrote:
- tuuca - tuutsa - tuutša - which one is better?

Probably tuutša, actually, although I used tuuca for some reason in my own post earlier. These are different orthographies, used at different times. Tuutša is a more modern spelling than tuuca. There could also be dialect differences in the pronunciation (tuutša versus tuutsa).

hajoseszter wrote: viiretti - veeretti - veeritti - which one is better?

I hear it as "viire-" rather than "veere-" or "veeri-".

hajoseszter wrote: Pääsköi tätyi itkemä[hä]

"The swallow started to cry."

hajoseszter wrote:
How sould this word "Lentteeli" pronounced?

I've asked it because I hear it with an "h" instead of the "n" and don't know why.

Okay, yeah, I hear that too, but there is no reason for it. Perhaps the singer was influenced by the pronunciation of "lehtoa" elsewhere in the song, but here it should be "lent-".


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