Redrawing borders

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vijayjohn
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Re: Redrawing borders

Postby vijayjohn » 2020-01-01, 21:51

Thanks for sharing to you, too! :)
Linguaphile wrote:Yes, in general they are smaller areas than what Vijay is referring to and they were decided by people who were geographically closer to them, but still, I'm not sure that makes any difference to the people who actually live there. (To an individual it doesn't make much difference how large or small the area is if friends and family or livelihood are on both sides of the border; nor does the distance between an individual and the decision-makers have much impact on how they feel about it.)

I'm talking about internal borders, though (and that too within empires that no longer exist anyway). You and Naava are both talking about international borders. That makes a huge difference! I can't think of a situation where crossing a provincial border (e.g. from Gaul to Hispania in the Roman Empire, from the Bengal Presidency to the Madras Presidency in British India) is as complicated as crossing an international one (e.g. from Estonia to Russia, from East Germany to West Germany).

For what it's worth, just in case it isn't clear, I realize these are all borders, and I get thinking all borders are bad and/or have their disadvantages. All I'm saying is that borders are also not all exactly the same and there are different kinds of borders and different issues with them. Splitting an ethnicity between two or more countries is one thing. Changing the borders of a country over hundreds of years as a result of wars, treaties, etc. is another thing. Slicing an area comparable in size to Europe in three because you feel like it is yet another thing. More than one of these things can be involved in carving a border, but this still does not make them exactly the same thing.

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Yasna
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Re: Redrawing borders

Postby Yasna » 2020-01-09, 3:33

Ein Buch muß die Axt sein für das gefrorene Meer in uns. - Kafka

vijayjohn
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Re: Redrawing borders

Postby vijayjohn » 2020-01-12, 7:22

I find a lot of problems with that video, including a few inaccuracies (for example, the people of South Sudan are nowhere close to being linguistically united...), but he does present the basic problem with (post)colonial borders in general pretty well, and I like his comparison of Nigeria to Portugal plus parts of Spain and France. :P

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Gormur
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Re: Redrawing borders

Postby Gormur » 2020-01-30, 13:42

I'm pretty big into cartography and I like the way Palestine looks

Also, Antarctica isn't an official country (maybe a nation, not sure). Though it might be neat to be able to look at a map of the permanent settlement and other bases there

I know the permanent settlement has a steady population of around 1,100 and it may be the New Zealand one. The net has conflicting information so i keep forgetting where that came from. There was a National Geographic series about the settlements there years ago as well

The laws set in place down there seem pretty interesting :hmm:
Eigi gegnir þat at segja at bók nøkkur er hreinferðug eðr ønnur spelluð því at vandliga ok dáliga eru bœkr ritnar ok annat kunnum vér eigi um þœr at dœma


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