Korean language study group?

aforl
Posts: 104
Joined: 2012-04-26, 18:15
Real Name: aforl
Gender: male
Country: SG Singapore (Singapore / 新加坡 / Singapura)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby aforl » 2014-05-25, 3:58

Lutrinae wrote:
Aku mau makan, yes, definitely one of the first thing I learn in any language :lol: (reminds me I should learn it in Korean ^^)

Thanks for the correction in english :oops: I don't know why I keep learning other languages when I can't even masterize ONE of them!!

Anyway, I will remember this 나/이나 :) . Can it also be used with a verb?
I don't know why I wrote 전은 instead of 저는 !!


Feels weird when I'm asking someone from France a question about Malay when I'm a Singaporean.... But what's mau as in Aku mau makan? :oops:

No worries, it's nearly impossible to get to a "native" level. Just try your best and keep practising, be it English or Korean!

Verbs uses 거나.
방학 때 저는 아르바이트를 하거나 여행갈 거예요.
I will do a part-time work or go for a vacation during the holidays.
Native: [flag=]en[/flag][flag=]zh[/flag][flag=]tw[/flag]
B1/B2: [flag=]ko[/flag]
A1: [flag=]yue.Hant[/flag][flag=]ja[/flag][flag=]ms[/flag]
TAC 2014 (II): [flag=]es[/flag][flag=]ko[/flag]

User avatar
Lutrinae
Posts: 230
Joined: 2010-09-13, 2:08
Country: RO Romania (România)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Lutrinae » 2014-05-25, 9:42

aforl wrote:
Feels weird when I'm asking someone from France a question about Malay when I'm a Singaporean.... But what's mau as in Aku mau makan? :oops:

No worries, it's nearly impossible to get to a "native" level. Just try your best and keep practising, be it English or Korean!

Verbs uses 거나.
방학 때 저는 아르바이트를 하거나 여행갈 거예요.
I will do a part-time work or go for a vacation during the holidays.



감사합니다 :)

Mau : want. The spelling might be bad since I did not practice for a long time but I think it's ok ^^

It was one of my fav language to learn, because I loved how it sounds and it's fairly easy if you have vocabulary.
Thanks for any correction :)

User avatar
Lutrinae
Posts: 230
Joined: 2010-09-13, 2:08
Country: RO Romania (România)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Lutrinae » 2014-06-05, 11:11

안녕하세요!

I just saw this Korean speech contest, you could win a round trip ticket to Korea and 6 days visit :)
Thanks for any correction :)

User avatar
Lutrinae
Posts: 230
Joined: 2010-09-13, 2:08
Country: RO Romania (România)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Lutrinae » 2019-10-20, 20:14

안녕하세요?

So, I am back on my Korean studies and I am learning time and date for now.

I am getting confused with the difference between 오전 and 아침; and 오후, 낮 and 점심.

If I understood it correctly, 오전 and 오후 are used like AM and PM, like literally from midnight to midday and midday to midnight.
But should they be only used when talking about time?

And then what is the difference between 낮 and 점심?

고맙슴니다!
Thanks for any correction :)

User avatar
linguoboy
Posts: 23763
Joined: 2009-08-25, 15:11
Real Name: Da
Location: Chicago
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby linguoboy » 2019-10-21, 20:59

Lutrinae wrote:I am getting confused with the difference between 오전 and 아침; and 오후, 낮 and 점심.

If I understood it correctly, 오전 and 오후 are used like AM and PM, like literally from midnight to midday and midday to midnight. But should they be only used when talking about time?

They can, but not everywhere where one can use 아침 and 저녁. So I might say 오전 내내 시간이 있습니다. "I'm free all morning" but 나는 아침마다 조깅합니다. I guess the difference is that in the first case, you're trying to negotiate a specific time to meet. (In English, you could also say "I'm free in the a.m.".) In the latter, you just mean at some time in the morning.

Lutrinae wrote:And then what is the difference between 낮 and 점심?

낮 refers to the period of daylight as opposed to the period of darkness. It can also mean "midday" in expressions like 낮참 "lunch" (lit. "daytime eating").

점심 just means lunch. It's cognate with Chinese 點心 "snack" and thus also US English dim sum "dumplings eaten at a restaurant around midday".
"Richmond is a real scholar; Owen just learns languages because he can't bear not to know what other people are saying."--Margaret Lattimore on her two sons

User avatar
Lutrinae
Posts: 230
Joined: 2010-09-13, 2:08
Country: RO Romania (România)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Lutrinae » 2019-10-22, 9:35

linguoboy wrote:
Lutrinae wrote:And then what is the difference between 낮 and 점심?

낮 refers to the period of daylight as opposed to the period of darkness. It can also mean "midday" in expressions like 낮참 "lunch" (lit. "daytime eating").

점심 just means lunch.


Really, midday? In the lesson I am following (Coursera - Yonsei Uni) they use them as afternoon. At least 오후 and 낮, and then I found somewhere else about 점심.

I am even more confused now :shock:

linguoboy wrote:It's cognate with Chinese 點心 "snack" and thus also US English dim sum "dumplings eaten at a restaurant around midday".


Thank you, I like the explanation around the meaning of a word, it makes it easier to memorize :D
Thanks for any correction :)

User avatar
Lutrinae
Posts: 230
Joined: 2010-09-13, 2:08
Country: RO Romania (România)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Lutrinae » 2020-01-19, 12:07

안녕하세요?

So, I am back at studying Korean!
And I decided to learn hanjas too, since for what I've read it's very useful to memorize korean words and meanings.

But I am having some understanding issues with my manual :oops:

Why are there numbers next to the radical, in 부수 column? (5th column) I thought at first it could be the number of strokes, but it seems unlikely.
And I am confused by the column 부수이름 (6th column). As I understand it, it's the radical name. But it seems to be constitued of two block each time, like for exemple 큰입 구 (in front of four)

Coud someone explain it? I tried to look for more explaination about this in the book but I couldn't find it.

For reference, it's Korean reader for Chinese characters, by KLEAR textbooks.
Last edited by Lutrinae on 2020-01-19, 12:17, edited 1 time in total.
Thanks for any correction :)

User avatar
Lutrinae
Posts: 230
Joined: 2010-09-13, 2:08
Country: RO Romania (România)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Lutrinae » 2020-01-19, 12:16

Alright, I forgot to attach the image...

Image
Thanks for any correction :)

User avatar
Yasna
Posts: 2303
Joined: 2011-09-12, 1:17
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Yasna » 2020-01-19, 17:11

Lutrinae wrote:Why are there numbers next to the radical, in 부수 column? (5th column) I thought at first it could be the number of strokes, but it seems unlikely.
And I am confused by the column 부수이름 (6th column). As I understand it, it's the radical name. But it seems to be constitued of two block each time, like for exemple 큰입 구 (in front of four)

Coud someone explain it? I tried to look for more explaination about this in the book but I couldn't find it.

The number represents the total stroke count of a hanja minus its radical's stroke count.

The Korean names of radicals consist of two parts, usually a native Korean meaning plus a Sino-Korean pronunciation.
Ein Buch muß die Axt sein für das gefrorene Meer in uns. - Kafka

User avatar
Lutrinae
Posts: 230
Joined: 2010-09-13, 2:08
Country: RO Romania (România)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Lutrinae » 2020-01-19, 17:20

Yasna wrote:
Lutrinae wrote:Why are there numbers next to the radical, in 부수 column? (5th column) I thought at first it could be the number of strokes, but it seems unlikely.
And I am confused by the column 부수이름 (6th column). As I understand it, it's the radical name. But it seems to be constitued of two block each time, like for exemple 큰입 구 (in front of four)

Coud someone explain it? I tried to look for more explaination about this in the book but I couldn't find it.

The number represents the total stroke count of a hanja minus its radical's stroke count.

The Korean names of radicals consist of two parts, usually a native Korean meaning plus a Sino-Korean pronunciation.


Thank you!

So for 큰입 구 for example, 큰입 would be the Korean meaning, enclosure? And 구 the Sino-Korean pronunciation, same as 8 then?
Thanks for any correction :)

User avatar
Yasna
Posts: 2303
Joined: 2011-09-12, 1:17
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Yasna » 2020-01-19, 20:32

Lutrinae wrote:So for 큰입 구 for example, 큰입 would be the Korean meaning, enclosure?

Koreans call it "big mouth", 큰입, and yes that is the native Korean part of the name.

And 구 the Sino-Korean pronunciation, same as 8 then?

That is the Sino-Korean reading of 口, but the Sino-Korean reading of 八 is 팔.
Ein Buch muß die Axt sein für das gefrorene Meer in uns. - Kafka

User avatar
Lutrinae
Posts: 230
Joined: 2010-09-13, 2:08
Country: RO Romania (România)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Lutrinae » 2020-01-19, 21:55

Ok, I think I got it :) (I hope!)

So for example 九 and 口 are both pronounced 구 in Sino-Korean, but have different meanings? Like they are homonyms?

Sorry for so many questions about this.
Thanks for any correction :)

User avatar
Osias
Posts: 8882
Joined: 2007-09-09, 17:38
Real Name: Osias Junior
Gender: male
Location: Vitória
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)
Contact:

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Osias » 2020-01-19, 22:19

Lutrinae wrote:안녕하세요?

So, I am back at studying Korean!
And I decided to learn hanjas too, since for what I've read it's very useful to memorize korean words and meanings.


How's that supposed to work? :hmm: :hmm:
2017 est l'année du (fr) et de l'(de) pour moi. Parle avec moi en eux, s'il te plait.

User avatar
Lutrinae
Posts: 230
Joined: 2010-09-13, 2:08
Country: RO Romania (România)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Lutrinae » 2020-01-19, 22:23

Osias wrote:
Lutrinae wrote:안녕하세요?

So, I am back at studying Korean!
And I decided to learn hanjas too, since for what I've read it's very useful to memorize korean words and meanings.


How's that supposed to work? :hmm: :hmm:


I am gonna link one of the most complete posts I found about this ( and the only one I can easily find from memory :D)

https://sofietokorea.com/2017/07/21/why-all-korean-learners-should-learn-a-few-chinese-characters/

She has one or two more posts about the use of hanja on her blog, too.
Thanks for any correction :)

User avatar
Osias
Posts: 8882
Joined: 2007-09-09, 17:38
Real Name: Osias Junior
Gender: male
Location: Vitória
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)
Contact:

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Osias » 2020-01-19, 22:27

Thanks.

I intend to learn all the Chinese characters but this is... I'm appalled. I thought they weren't used anymore in these days. :x :x

They have this perfect writing system for they own language and... and... ok, it's probably not perfect after all, once they feel the need to complement it with that.
2017 est l'année du (fr) et de l'(de) pour moi. Parle avec moi en eux, s'il te plait.

User avatar
Lutrinae
Posts: 230
Joined: 2010-09-13, 2:08
Country: RO Romania (România)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Lutrinae » 2020-01-19, 22:30

Lutrinae wrote:Ok, I think I got it :) (I hope!)

So for example 九 and 口 are both pronounced 구 in Sino-Korean, but have different meanings? Like they are homonyms?

Sorry for so many questions about this.


Actually I have one more question :whistle: :para:

I will keep the same example, plus another one:

口 큰입 : does it have also the same meaning in korean, or does 큰입 only represents the sound, and "enclosure" is valid only as a meaning in chinese?

Same as , it says there that the Korean is and the meaning is sun. But I thought that sun in Korean was 태양 or ?

Because of that how I understand it is: 6th column, Korean sound but meaningless, and the english column describing the meaning.
Thanks for any correction :)

User avatar
Lutrinae
Posts: 230
Joined: 2010-09-13, 2:08
Country: RO Romania (România)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Lutrinae » 2020-01-19, 22:34

Osias wrote:Thanks.

I intend to learn all the Chinese characters but this is... I'm appalled. I thought they weren't used anymore in these days. :x :x

They have this perfect writing system for they own language and... and... ok, it's probably not perfect after all, once they feel the need to complement it with that.



Apparently they are used sometimes, maybe in newspaper or scholar books. I am not sure that it's mandatory to know them to learn Korean, but it seems to be like a sort of etymology and to help understand better words family and such.

All the Chinese characters? :shock: You are so brave!!

What appals you exactly? The mingling of both?

I am actually disapointed because I bought some years ago a book about Chinese characters, some kind of study, and it would be super useful right now but I left it in storage when I could totally have brought it with me :lol:
But I just didn't think of it...
Thanks for any correction :)

User avatar
Yasna
Posts: 2303
Joined: 2011-09-12, 1:17
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Yasna » 2020-01-20, 1:35

Lutrinae wrote:So for example 九 and 口 are both pronounced 구 in Sino-Korean, but have different meanings? Like they are homonyms?

Correct.

Lutrinae wrote:口 큰입 : does it have also the same meaning in korean, or does 큰입 only represents the sound, and "enclosure" is valid only as a meaning in chinese?

I would say that 큰입 (big mouth) is basically describing the shape and "enclosure" is describing both the shape and meaning. These English names of radicals could come from anywhere. They could be a translation from Chinese, Japanese, or Korean character dictionaries, or an original creation of an English speaker. In any case, they don't all line up exactly with the Korean names of the radicals. For example, I would translate 큰입 구 as "the character pronounced 구 which looks like a 큰입 (big mouth)".

Same as , it says there that the Korean is and the meaning is sun. But I thought that sun in Korean was 태양 or ?

"Sun" and "day" are closely related concepts, which is reflected in the use of 日, whether as a radical or a character. I would translate 날 일 as "the character pronounced 일 which means 날 (day)".

Osias wrote:I intend to learn all the Chinese characters but this is... I'm appalled. I thought they weren't used anymore in these days. :x :x

They have this perfect writing system for they own language and... and... ok, it's probably not perfect after all, once they feel the need to complement it with that.

The problem is the Sino-Korean vocabulary of Korean, in particular homophonous morphemes. Imagine trying to learn vocabulary like "geography" and "telephone" if the morphemes "geo", "graph", "tele", and "phone" each had 5 to 10 unrelated meanings. That gives you an idea of the situation Korean learners face as they try to build up their vocabulary, especially of higher register words which are disproportionately of Sino-Korean origin.

Knowing some Chinese characters provides some structure to that process. The characters are also used at times for disambiguation, to improve readability (especially in terse newspaper headlines), and for stylistic reasons.
Ein Buch muß die Axt sein für das gefrorene Meer in uns. - Kafka

User avatar
Lutrinae
Posts: 230
Joined: 2010-09-13, 2:08
Country: RO Romania (România)

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Lutrinae » 2020-01-20, 6:48

Thank you Yasna for the elaborate answer! I think it's clear now : In the radical columns from the right, I don't use any of those as a translation from the Chinese character to an actual Korean words (if it makes sens).

First is the radical, second its description (and name of it?), and third the sound it has in Korean. Then the English is a description of the Chinese character, but not related to Korean.

Please tell me I got it this time :oops: :ohwell:
Thanks for any correction :)

User avatar
Osias
Posts: 8882
Joined: 2007-09-09, 17:38
Real Name: Osias Junior
Gender: male
Location: Vitória
Country: BR Brazil (Brasil)
Contact:

Re: Korean language study group?

Postby Osias » 2020-01-20, 18:53

Lutrinae wrote:All the Chinese characters? :shock: You are so brave!!


They say after the first 8000 the rest is easier.


What appals you exactly? The mingling of both?
The fact the korean alphabet should be enough. And the mingling of both.
2017 est l'année du (fr) et de l'(de) pour moi. Parle avec moi en eux, s'il te plait.


Return to “Korean (한국어)”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest