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JackFrost
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Re: Discussion Group

Postby JackFrost » 2018-10-27, 17:24

Qui peut me dire comment on prononce "meuge"? Avec le /œ/ ou le /ø/?

Je pense que c'est bien le /ø/ vu qu'il existe le mot "Maubeuge" (à ma connaissance, le seul exemple du [øːʒ]).

Parce que j'essaie sans succès de trouver des mots avec le [œːʒ} et je pense sérieusement que la combinaison [œːʒ] est vraiment pas permise en français pour cause de contraints phonotactiques.
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Major French breakthrough?

Postby langmon » 2018-11-10, 10:40

Background:
- Having learned Latin for a few years a long time ago.
- Rather advanced degree of Spanish fluency (B2 or possibly even more, depending on the subject).
- Passive understanding of written Spanish and French: B2 up to C2, depending on the subject, too.

How to achieve a really major French breakthrough?

Some things I still need to learn more about include:

- Understanding spoken French, including, but not limited to, the "issue" of silent letters and liaison.

- Advancing my level of Written French Understanding some more, because even if it is B2 up to C2 for both of ES and FR, my French understanding ability is lagging behind the Spanish one.
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Re: Major French breakthrough?

Postby JackFrost » 2018-11-10, 19:39

SomehowGeekyPolyglot wrote:How to achieve a really major French breakthrough?

By still sticking to it? You know, use it a few times per day. Read it. Hear it. Speak it. Write it. It's a pretty common language, after all.

- Understanding spoken French, including, but not limited to, the "issue" of silent letters and liaison.

That alone can make a booklet. See where what trips you up the most and there, we can specifically help you out.
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Re: Discussion Group

Postby langmon » 2018-11-11, 17:14

There's something better than what I was recently still thinking about :). This would be to ask very short questions only. And even the answers to any of those, when they pile up, the result could be something really big. (Although I don't have the same background as those who usually say the following, but still) "the whole is greater than the part/parts".

Was anyone of you able to recall the French accents much better after having done a great deal of writing practice?
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Re: Discussion Group

Postby Dormouse559 » 2018-11-11, 18:06

If you are talking about the diacritics (rather than the distinct ways of pronouncing the language, e.g. a Parisian accent, a Québécois accent), then yes; the main way to learn the placement of accents is with practice.
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Re: Discussion Group

Postby langmon » 2018-11-11, 18:08

Dormouse559 wrote:If you are talking about the diacritics (rather than the distinct ways of pronouncing the language, e.g. a Parisian accent, a Québécois accent), then yes; the main way to learn the placement of accents is with practice.


Yes, those three types of diacritics :). Maybe this (i.e. written French practice) really was what I still was missing. Because I already passively read quite a lot of French.
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Re: Discussion Group

Postby langmon » 2018-11-12, 1:55

"Le théier, arbre à thé ou tout simplement thé, (Camellia sinensis) est un arbuste originaire d'Extrême-Orient, de la famille des Théacées."

Why is it "arbre à thé" and not "arbre de thé"? Is this just a preference of usage, or would changing it to "de" change the meaning too?

(Not playing any video games, but simply trying to read about a multitude of subjects in French, too)
"Super Mario World introduit les niveaux à plusieurs sorties."

If I would speak about something like this, I would use one of the past tenses. But here, the present tense is being used instead, even if this game is very, very old. Is this something common in French, or rather exceptional?

"Les mini-tours sont présentes a partir de Super Mario Bros.3 et permettent d'affronter des mini-boss"

When looking up affronter in the dictionary, it stated that this verb is being used for both of confrontation (that includes combating that mini-boss :ohwell:) and simply meeting him only.

Is there also another verb that makes it very clear that one is talking about confrontation, rather than merely meeting someone?
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Re: Discussion Group

Postby Saim » 2018-11-20, 18:01

SomehowGeekyPolyglot wrote:Why is it "arbre à thé" and not "arbre de thé"? Is this just a preference of usage, or would changing it to "de" change the meaning too?


https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%C3%A0

Used to describe a part of something, often translated into English as a compound adjective
un animal à quatre pattes ― a four-legged animal
une femme au visage pâle ― a pale-faced woman
un homme à longue barbe ― a long-bearded man OR a man with a long beard
une chemise à manches courtes ― a short-sleeved shirt
une maison aux murs de brique ― a brick-walled house / a house with brick walls

https://glosbe.com/en/fr/tea%20tree

all the translations give arbre à thé or théier, although it seems arbre de thé is also used.

SomehowGeekyPolyglot wrote:(Not playing any video games, but simply trying to read about a multitude of subjects in French, too)
"Super Mario World introduit les niveaux à plusieurs sorties."

If I would speak about something like this, I would use one of the past tenses. But here, the present tense is being used instead, even if this game is very, very old. Is this something common in French, or rather exceptional?


In English, and I think in many European languages (certainly in Catalan and Spanish, so I think your French example is the same phenomenon), we do this all the time when doing some sort of narration or chronology.

In x year, Super Mario World introduces levels with multiple exits. - Perfectly correct English that would be completely normal (in fact, probably expected) in some sort of chronological narration on developments in videogame history or whatever.

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Re: Discussion Group

Postby linguoboy » 2018-11-20, 18:39

Saim wrote:
SomehowGeekyPolyglot wrote:If I would speak about something like this, I would use one of the past tenses. But here, the present tense is being used instead, even if this game is very, very old. Is this something common in French, or rather exceptional?

In English, and I think in many European languages (certainly in Catalan and Spanish, so I think your French example is the same phenomenon), we do this all the time when doing some sort of narration or chronology.

For this reason, it's sometimes called the "narrative present", but the more common label is "historical present":

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_present

It exists in German as well, but I don't think it gets used as much there are in other languages (perhaps because German already has a tense closely associated with narrative functions).
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Re: Discussion Group

Postby Prantsis » 2018-11-20, 20:10

Saim wrote:https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%C3%A0

Used to describe a part of something, often translated into English as a compound adjective
un animal à quatre pattes ― a four-legged animal
une femme au visage pâle ― a pale-faced woman
un homme à longue barbe ― a long-bearded man OR a man with a long beard
une chemise à manches courtes ― a short-sleeved shirt
une maison aux murs de brique ― a brick-walled house / a house with brick walls

You're not quoting the relevant part of the article:
"
9. Used to make compound nouns to state what something is used for
moulin à poivre ― pepper mill
sac à dos ― backpack
boite à musique ― music box
"
Saim wrote:all the translations give arbre à thé or théier, although it seems arbre de thé is also used.

I would call it théier. Arbre à thé usually refers to melaleuca alternifolia, a different tree. I think I've never heard arbre de thé.

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Re: Discussion Group

Postby linguoboy » 2018-11-20, 20:48

Prantsis wrote:I would call it théier. Arbre à thé usually refers to melaleuca alternifolia, a different tree. I think I've never heard arbre de thé.

Could you use that for, for example, a Christmas tree decoration built from individual canisters of tea?
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Re: Discussion Group

Postby Car » 2018-11-20, 21:25

I only had a brief look at it, but that does seem to correspond to what I learnt about it:
https://www.thoughtco.com/a-vs-de-frenc ... ns-4080520
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Re: Discussion Group

Postby langmon » 2018-11-21, 8:02

fasttrackgear123 wrote:Hello, today i try to create this t-shirt but i have still confused. can anyone tell me what's wrong have in this t-shirt.


All I can see is a commercial offer [intentionally not requoting the link from the original post].

But a certain post can be of interest to you. All you have to do is to click on the button inside the post to know about a Very Very Special Offer for Fighting Mean Green Internet Snakes. It only costs a single Internet Coin even (although this offer is restricted to someone else only, you are excluded from it):

https://forum.unilang.org/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=39098&p=1125757#p1125757
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Re: Discussion Group

Postby Prantsis » 2018-11-21, 8:39

linguoboy wrote:
Prantsis wrote:I would call it théier. Arbre à thé usually refers to melaleuca alternifolia, a different tree. I think I've never heard arbre de thé.

Could you use that for, for example, a Christmas tree decoration built from individual canisters of tea?

Do you mean something like this? Then yes, sapin de thé sounds like a possible short name for it (sapin rather than arbre, though). I didn't know it existed.

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Re: Discussion Group

Postby linguoboy » 2018-11-21, 15:11

Prantsis wrote:Do you mean something like this? Then yes, sapin de thé sounds like a possible short name for it (sapin rather than arbre, though). I didn't know it existed.

Ouais, voilà exactement ce que j'avais en tête.
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Re: Discussion Group

Postby Null-A » 2018-11-21, 16:11

I would describe the above picture as "un arbre en (sachets de) thé" maybe. That's what would feel the most natural to me.

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Re: Discussion Group

Postby Saim » 2018-12-21, 6:53

Quelle est la différence entre sac à dos et cartable? Le chinois sans peine traduit 书包 comme cartable où j'aurais esperé sac à dos. Quand je cherce cartable par Google je trouve des images qui semblent plutôt illustrer une sorte de sac à main gros, mais 书包 c'est un sac à dos à mon avis.

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Re: Discussion Group

Postby Prantsis » 2018-12-22, 15:33

Saim wrote:Quelle est la différence entre sac à dos et cartable? Le chinois sans peine traduit 书包 comme cartable où j'aurais esperé sac à dos. Quand je cherce cartable par Google je trouve des images qui semblent plutôt illustrer une sorte de sac à main gros, mais 书包 c'est un sac à dos à mon avis.

cartable = schoolbag
Je pourrais appeler ces 书包 soit des cartables (s'ils sont utlilisés pour l'école), soit, en effet, des sacs à dos.
Pour les « gros sacs à main », je dirais seulement cartable. (Note cependant que ces sacs sont tous munis de bretelles et se portent habituellement sur le dos.)

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Re: Discussion Group

Postby Dormouse559 » 2019-02-09, 6:46

Comment prononce-t-on le prénom « Josephte » ? Est-ce qu'il s'agit d'une orthographe étymologique de « Josette » ?
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Re: Discussion Group

Postby Prantsis » 2019-02-27, 19:44

Dormouse559 wrote:Comment prononce-t-on le prénom « Josephte » ? Est-ce qu'il s'agit d'une orthographe étymologique de « Josette » ?

« Le prénom féminin Josette est un diminutif de Josèphe ou Josephte, versions féminines de Joseph selon les régions. » (Wikipedia)
Je n'ai jamais entendu le prénom Josephte. Personnellement, je le prononcerais comme il est écrit : /ft/.


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