Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

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linguoboy
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2018-10-02, 14:15

(cy) twlc mochyn pigsty
(cy) ocheneidio sigh
(cy) ychwanegol additional
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby ceid donn » 2018-10-03, 23:42

(sv) schack - chess
(cy) gwyddbwyll - chess; fidchell (a board game mentioned in Celtic legends)

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby ceid donn » 2018-10-04, 15:06

(gd) luinneag Luimneach - limerick

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Luís » 2018-10-05, 10:08

(es) cachear to search, to frisk ((pt) revistar)
(es) ciénaga marsh, swamp ((pt) lamaçal)
Quot linguas calles, tot homines vales

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2018-10-09, 14:54

(fr) s'entre-tuer to kill each other
(de) Knopfleiste placket
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Vlürch » 2018-10-10, 22:51

Japanese (ja) 虫歯 (mushiba) - cavity (on a tooth)
Japanese (ja) 荒地 (arechi) - wasteland
Japanese (ja) (tsubomi) - bud (of a flower)

Mandarin (zh) 荒地 (huāngdì) - wasteland

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Luís » 2018-10-13, 20:22

(es) botiquín first aid kit ((pt) caixa de primeiros socorros)
(es) talego jail (slang, Spain)
Quot linguas calles, tot homines vales

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby IpseDixit » 2018-10-13, 23:21

(en) coloratura

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby ceid donn » 2018-10-14, 1:55

(id) memalukan - embarrassing

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2018-10-17, 19:39

(fr) bousiller wreck, ruin
(de) Englischer Kuchen fruitcake
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Vlürch » 2018-10-19, 3:29

Arabic (ar) معبد (maʿbad) - temple

Japanese (ja) 奇跡 (kiseki) - miracle
Japanese (ja) 猿轡 (sarugutsuwa) - gag (for the mouth)
Both words I'd encountered before, but now I've actually more or less memorised them.

Classical Chinese (zhc) (?) - to disembowel
Randomly stumbled upon this as a result of a corrupt filename, which included a bunch of other obscure hanzi. Nice addition to my collection of "dark words", heh. I wonder what its pronunciation was; the reconstruction given on this site is /*t’iɑ ~ *diɑ/ or /*rhaiʔ ~ *laiʔ/ in Old Chinese, but I mean in Middle Chinese or whatever.

English (en) orphrey
English (en) organza

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2018-10-19, 12:13

Classical Chinese (zhc) (?) - to disembowel


I found this listed in several authoritative sources including Unihan. Looks like there are two accepted pronunciations in contemporary Chinese (both Standard Chinese and Cantonese).

(ca) mitger sharecropper
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-10-20, 4:44

Vlürch wrote:I wonder what its pronunciation was; the reconstruction given on this site is /*t’iɑ ~ *diɑ/ or /*rhaiʔ ~ *laiʔ/ in Old Chinese, but I mean in Middle Chinese or whatever.

This says:

Modern (Beijing) reading: yǐ
Preclassic Old Chinese: Łajʔ
Classic Old Chinese: Łáj
Western Han Chinese: láj
Eastern Han Chinese: źáj
Early Postclassic Chinese: źáj
Middle Postclassic Chinese: jáj
Late Postclassic Chinese: jáj
Middle Chinese: jé

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Vlürch » 2018-10-20, 6:16

linguoboy wrote:I found this listed in several authoritative sources including Unihan. Looks like there are two accepted pronunciations in contemporary Chinese (both Standard Chinese and Cantonese).

That's something I've noticed myself with a lot of different obscure characters, which is pretty confusing. I mean, if they're no longer used, why would they have set pronunciations? Are they "preconstructed" based on earlier pronunciations? But if the earlier pronunciations are reconstructed, that seems a bit paradoxical... or were they still used so recently that they already had established pronunciations in the modern Sinitic languages that could be documented before they ceased to be used? Or are they still used occasionally? Maybe in historical fiction or something if nowhere else? Sorry for bombarding you with questions (once again :oops:), especially when I probably should be asking OldBoring instead... hopefully he'll see this and feel like responding.
vijayjohn wrote:Modern (Beijing) reading: yǐ
Preclassic Old Chinese: Łajʔ
Classic Old Chinese: Łáj
Western Han Chinese: láj
Eastern Han Chinese: źáj
Early Postclassic Chinese: źáj
Middle Postclassic Chinese: jáj
Late Postclassic Chinese: jáj
Middle Chinese: jé

Hmm, so what would it most likely have become if it was borrowed into Japanese? Would it be just /i/?

~

English (en) recidivism

Japanese (ja) 横雨 (yokoame) - rain that falls sideways due to wind
A pretty obvious compound, but it's nice. I should be focusing on learning completely new words rather than new compounds, and maybe some that are actually commonly used... :P

Classical Chinese (zhc) - white silk; to boil and scour raw silk (so that it becomes soft and white)
For the verbal meaning, Wiktionary just says "to boil and scour raw silk" but the Xinhua dictionary includes the part I put in parentheses. Not sure if boiling and scouring raw silk (whatever that even means in practice; I'm not a clothing manufacturer) could have an alternative outcome as well, but it doesn't really matter either way. Kinda sad that the modern meaning is apparently "to practise" rather than "white silk". I mean, having a specific word for white silk is pretty cool.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby ceid donn » 2018-10-20, 17:03

(cy) bysell - key (computer, musical instrument)
(cy) bysellfyrdd - keyboard
(cy) cyfrinair - password
(cy) taenlen - spreadsheet
(cy) caledwedd - hardware
(cy) meddalwedd - software
Last edited by ceid donn on 2018-10-20, 17:19, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby ceid donn » 2018-10-20, 17:17

While I knew Welsh had a word for "selfie" (hunlun), I just learned Scottish Gaelic has one too:

(gd) fèineag - selfie

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby linguoboy » 2018-10-20, 18:39

You prompted to learn the Irish: (ga) féinín.
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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby ceid donn » 2018-10-20, 21:23

Welsh is so delightful.

(cy) disgyrchiant - gravity

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Dormouse559 » 2018-10-20, 22:41

(fr) maïzéna f - cornstarch
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

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Re: Last word in a foreign language that you learnt

Postby Naava » 2018-10-20, 22:53

Dormouse559 wrote:(fr) maïzéna f - cornstarch

What?? So that's where the brand name of this cornstarch product comes from? :shock:


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