Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Naava » 2018-06-23, 17:10

Linguaphile wrote:Slang words for school subjects:
füssa = füüsika physics
kemma = keemia chemistry

We called physics and chemistry fyssa and kemma, too! I didn't know they're the same in Estonian. :D

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-06-23, 18:43

juugend art nouveau
lõuend canvas

Naava wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:Slang words for school subjects:
füssa = füüsika physics
kemma = keemia chemistry

We called physics and chemistry fyssa and kemma, too! I didn't know they're the same in Estonian. :D

:D

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby ainurakne » 2018-06-23, 19:50

Linguaphile wrote:inga = inglise keel English language
mats = matemaatika mathematics
Back in my time these were inka and mata (with palatalized t).
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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-06-23, 23:25

ainurakne wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:inga = inglise keel English language
mats = matemaatika mathematics
Back in my time these were inka and mata (with palatalized t).

Naava wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:Slang words for school subjects:
füssa = füüsika physics
kemma = keemia chemistry

We called physics and chemistry fyssa and kemma, too! I didn't know they're the same in Estonian. :D

The two of you got me curious so I googled it and found a whole list with all of the above plus many more: Õppeainete nimetused.
By the way, soovin kõigile head võidupüha ning ilusat jaanipäeva!
Last edited by Linguaphile on 2018-07-15, 23:53, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Prantsis » 2018-06-29, 22:36

tanum village street
paraadna (big) front door
koorekiht fig. cream, elite
sitsima (dog) to sit up and beg, fig. to curry favor

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-07-07, 6:36

sangapidi by the handle (i.e. võttis ämbri sangapidi kätte, he took the bucket [in his hand] by the handle, he picked up the bucket by the handle)

kallutama to tip, to tilt
nõjatuma to lean
konutama to sit idle :?:
ahju taga konutama to sit around at home, not going out

tähelepanu lõdvestama to let down one's guard
lihaseid lõdvestama to relax one's muscles
haaret lõdvendama to slacken one's grip

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-07-15, 23:40

kasutuselevõtmine introduction (i.e., of something new), bringing into use
= kasutuselevõtt

seitsmepenikoormasaabastega very quickly (especially when referring to societal changes, advances in technology, etc)

väljavaade expectation, prospect, outlook
head väljavaadet omama to stand a good chance
ebakindel tulevikuväljavaade uncertain future
suurepärased tulevikuväljavaated excellent future prospects

kimpu jääma to be at a loss

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Prantsis » 2018-07-16, 20:19

soider non-frozen spot on a frozen sea
room big, broad wave
krunt sea floor
Laev läks krunti.
tonger coastguard
lahve = lahtine
Lahve meri. Lahve laia taeva all.
kadarik area covered with junipers
tuhlis potato
raand bucket
lasn wooden shovel
koost wooden spoon
kaatsad (worn) trousers
täos = tallel, tagavaras
pire = natuke

Linguaphile wrote:seitsmepenikoormasaabastega very quickly (especially when referring to societal changes, advances in technology, etc)

with giant strides

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-07-16, 21:10

Prantsis wrote:soider non-frozen spot on a frozen sea
room big, broad wave
krunt sea floor
Laev läks krunti.
tonger coastguard
lahve = lahtine
Lahve meri. Lahve laia taeva all.
kadarik area covered with junipers
tuhlis potato
raand bucket
lasn wooden shovel
koost wooden spoon
kaatsad (worn) trousers
täos = tallel, tagavaras
pire = natuke

You must be reading something from Saaremaa! :D
SoiderImage
TongerImage
LahveImage
KadarikImage
Not posting images for the others to avoid filling up the whole screen with them, but here they are if you're interested: raand, koost, kaatsad, täos, pire


Uued sõnad:

kahtluseuss lit. doubt-worm, worm of suspicion
kahtluseuss närib sows seeds of doubt/suspicion, lit. doubt-worm gnaws
mind närib kahtluseuss I have doubts, qualms, suspicions
väike kahtluseuss närib hinge have some [small] doubts, be unsure/uncertain about

muljetama to share impressions; to compare notes

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Prantsis » 2018-07-17, 22:39

Linguaphile wrote:You must be reading something from Saaremaa! :D

Yes I am. :D
Mul on käsil Uustulndi „Tuulte tallermaa” II osa. (Kahjuks viimane peatükk on lähenemas aga III osa ei paista kuskil saadaval olevat...)

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-07-18, 0:58

Prantsis wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:You must be reading something from Saaremaa! :D

Yes I am. :D
Mul on käsil Uustulndi „Tuulte tallermaa” II osa. (Kahjuks viimane peatükk on lähenemas aga III osa ei paista kuskil saadaval olevat...)
Kas sa oled juba lugenud I osa ka? See on vist huvitav teos (ja nähtavasti saarte murdesõnu täis), aga ma pole seda lugenud.

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Prantsis » 2018-07-18, 21:58

Esimese köite ma lugesin eelmisel aastal kevadel. See oli üks esimesi eestikeelseid raamatuid, mis ma lugesin.

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-08-22, 23:59

hõrenema = to grow spare/thin
härras (härda) = sorrowful, woeful, doleful
jalamaid = at once, in short order
keltsavangis = frost-bound
kiusupunn = meanie
moosekant = musician, music player (= muusikant)
poosetaja = person who shows off, poser
seinaorv = niche, alacove
silmakirjaks = ostensibly, supposedly, deceptively
silmaotsaski = not at all (= üldse mitte)
sõnulseletamatu = ineffable
taud = distemper
veesoon = aquifer
üdini = to the core

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-08-26, 2:02

Prantsis wrote:söögivahe ~ half a day (interval between two meals)


Prantsis, you have inspired a whole word-study! You posted this back in June, and then today I ran across the same word in a book. At first I couldn't remember that it was here that I'd seen it, and in the context where I found it I understood it as "all afternoon" (or "all morning," since the time day was not clear); now that I have found this post again your "half a day" works in that context too. Anyway, I looked it up in my big Saagpakk dictionary and found some interesting things, so I thought I'd post here what I found in Saagpakk and EKSS about the usage of this word.
The sentences come from EKSS but the translations of the sentences (and any errors they contain) are mine.

söögivahe EKSS:aeg ühest söögiajast teise (Saagpakk: time between two meals)
Tööpäev jagunes kolmeks söögivaheks. The working day was divided into three periods/intervals/shifts (between meal breaks).
Niitis heina ühe söögivahega maha. He cut the hay in half a day. (In English we'd probably say he cut it in one morning, or in one afternoon, depending on the time of day.)
Täismehe käes on see paari söögivahe töö. For a full-grown (able-bodied) man this work would take a couple of half-days. (That doesn't come out sounding right in English; maybe "This work would take all morning and afternoon" is better?" "For an able-bodied man this work would last from breakfast to dinnertime?") :?:
Linnasõiduks kulub terve söögivahe, ligi viis tundi. To travel to the city it takes a half a day (a whole morning until lunchtime OR a whole afternoon until dinnertime), around five hours.
Läksid loogeldes kogu söögivahe, kuni kõik olid läinud. The (the snakes) went winding away all morning/afternoon, until they had all gone. (This is the sentence I came across today in a book.)

söögivahetund EKSS: pikem vahetund, kus on võimalik einestada (Saagpakk: break for lunch [at school])
Söögivahetunnil jõudsid õpilased õueski olla. The students got to be outdoors during lunch (during the lunch break/lunch hour).

söögivaheaeg EKSS:vaheaeg kahe söögikorra vahel (Saagpakk: lunch hour, coffee break; (of a baby) time between feedings)*
Söögivaheaegadel pole kasulik midagi näksida. It's not good for you to nibble/snack between meals.
Imik peab juba öisest söögivaheajast kinni. The infant already goes the night without eating. (I think that's how it would be said in English. More literally, something like "the baby already keeps to his nighttime food-break" :?: ).

*Note that where Saagpakk translates söögivaheaeg as "lunch hour, coffee break; (of a baby) time between feedings," the two meanings actually seem to be two completely different words with completely different (nearly opposite) meanings; the EKSS definition only matches (loosely) with the second one. This is the part that I thought was rather fun....
söögi|vaheaeg = lunch hour, coffee break (the break [vaheaeg] for food [söök])
söögivahe|aeg = time between meals; (of a baby) time between feedings (the time [aeg] between meals/feedings [söögivahe])

This is a bit funny because I had Saagpakk's definition in mind ("lunch hour, coffee break") when I first tried to translate the sentence Söögivaheaegadel pole kasulik midagi näksida, so I came up with the rather weird "It's not good for you to nibble/snack during food breaks." Really? No snacking during the söögi|vaheaeg? So when are you supposed to eat? LOL. But no, it's no snacking during the söögivahe|aeg between meals. This kind of thing could keep me entertained all day. :roll: Okay, but seriously. It doesn't seem like söögi|vaheaeg is all that common. Saagpakk's dictionary has some outdated terms in it as well as some that never were widely used at any time, so you really never know. Kohvipaus or söögivahetund seems more common today, but söögi|vaheaeg is sometimes used: here they get a söögi|vaheaeg at 10 am and another at noon, for example. And söögivahe|aeg is also definitely used, too, especially when talking about how long babies go between feedings.

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby aaakknu » 2018-08-26, 9:34

Linguaphile wrote:söögi|vaheaeg = lunch hour, coffee break (the break [vaheaeg] for food [söök])
söögivahe|aeg = time between meals; (of a baby) time between feedings (the time [aeg] between meals/feedings [söögivahe])

This is interesting. Are they pronounced differently?
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TAC 2019

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby ainurakne » 2018-08-26, 10:26

Linguaphile wrote:taud = distemper
What is distemper?
All I can find about it is that it's somekind of dog disease.

Taud is any kind of infectious disease. Or an outbreak of such a disease.

Salajane wrote:Are they pronounced differently?
Yes.
In söögi|vaheaeg, there is a tiny pause between söögi and vaheaeg, and vaheaeg has almost full stress on its first syllable, almost as if it were a separate word.
In söögivahe|aeg, there is a tiny pause between söögivahe and aeg, and aeg has almost full stress on its first (and in this case: only) syllable, almost as if it were a separate word.

(normally, non-initial words in compounds have a lot weaker stress on their first syllable than free-standing words)
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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-08-26, 16:45

Ainurakne! Nii tore et sa tagasi oled!

ainurakne wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:taud = distemper
What is distemper?
All I can find about it is that it's somekind of dog disease.

Taud is any kind of infectious disease. Or an outbreak of such a disease.

Oh wow, thanks for the correction! I looked in some online Estonian-English dictionaries that said it meant "distemper" so I went with that without investigating further. The context gave no clues - just a fairy tale with a tark vanamees doing alliterative things to help the community: sunnib vilja võrsuma, päikese paistma, tervist tulema, valu vähenema ja taudi taganema. Yes, distemper is a dog disease.... I just figured he was helping out the neighborhood dogs as well. :D Sometimes alliteration can lead to such random things, so it didn't strike me as odd at all that he'd drive away a particular dog disease. But I was surprised that such a specific disease seemed to have such a general-sounding name. I don't know why I didn't look in EKSS or Saagpakk's dictionary like I usually do, both of which would have given me the definition you just gave. :roll: Now looking in those sources I've found suu- ja sõrataud, laustaud, rändtaud, and so on, and it makes more sense! Thanks!

ainurakne wrote:
Salajane wrote:Are they pronounced differently?
Yes.
In söögi|vaheaeg, there is a tiny pause between söögi and vaheaeg, and vaheaeg has almost full stress on its first syllable, almost as if it were a separate word.
In söögivahe|aeg, there is a tiny pause between söögivahe and aeg, and aeg has almost full stress on its first (and in this case: only) syllable, almost as if it were a separate word.

(normally, non-initial words in compounds have a lot weaker stress on their first syllable than free-standing words)

Speaking of this, do you know if there is a list of such words anywhere (compounds that are composed two different ways with two meanings/pronunciations)? It would be a fun list.
(Edit: I don't mean a comprehensive list, I don't think that would be possible. But a list of some of the more common other words like this. I'm not sure what keywords to use to search for such a thing.)

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby ainurakne » 2018-08-27, 18:40

Linguaphile wrote:Ainurakne! Nii tore et sa tagasi oled!
Ma käin siin ikka kogu aeg piilumas. Ei oska enamasti lihtsalt midagi tarka öelda.

Linguaphile wrote:Now looking in those sources I've found suu- ja sõrataud, laustaud, rändtaud, and so on, and it makes more sense!
And marutaud (rabies), although this one is sometimes also referred to as marutõbi.

Linguaphile wrote:Speaking of this, do you know if there is a list of such words anywhere (compounds that are composed two different ways with two meanings/pronunciations)? It would be a fun list.
(Edit: I don't mean a comprehensive list, I don't think that would be possible. But a list of some of the more common other words like this. I'm not sure what keywords to use to search for such a thing.)
Unfortunately not.

Compounds are sometimes difficult for Estonians too, especially since it's not always audible in speech whether the words in question should be written separately or as one. Things get especially confusing if there are more than two consecutive words that may form a compound.

Speaking of this, from my previous post it may have seemed that the differences I described are very apparent. They may be. But they may also be very subtle, or not apparent at all - it depends on the speaker, the tempo of the speech and so on.
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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-08-28, 2:18

é
ainurakne wrote:Ei oska enamasti lihtsalt midagi tarka öelda.

Ma ei usu seda. :lol:

ainurakne wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:Now looking in those sources I've found suu- ja sõrataud, laustaud, rändtaud, and so on, and it makes more sense!
And marutaud (rabies), although this one is sometimes also referred to as marutõbi.

Ja gripitaud, koolerataud, kalataud... although I don't know if kalataud is a disease that fish get, or a disease that people get that is called kalataud for whatever reason... the EKSS entry for it is the least helpful dictionary entry I've ever seen. (Well, I suppose that means the meaning is supposed to be obvious from the parts, which must mean it is a disease that fish get. Or maybe the dictionary writers don't know either.) :rotfl:

ainurakne wrote:Compounds are sometimes difficult for Estonians too, especially since it's not always audible in speech whether the words in question should be written separately or as one. Things get especially confusing if there are more than two consecutive words that may form a compound.

Speaking of this, from my previous post it may have seemed that the differences I described are very apparent. They may be. But they may also be very subtle, or not apparent at all - it depends on the speaker, the tempo of the speech and so on.

Hehe, yeah, in fast speech it's really easy to miss or maybe it's not there at all. But at least if I think I've just been told ˈsöögiˌvaheaegadel pole kasulik midagi süüa it's then possible to clear up the misunderstanding by enunciating slowly and carefully ˈsöögivaheˌaegadel pole kasulik midagi süüa and clear up whether or not it's reasonable to eat during a lunch break. In writing, there's no such luck!

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Prantsis » 2018-09-03, 22:12

Linguaphile wrote:and clear up whether or not it's reasonable to eat during a lunch break.
Kahtluse korral oleks siiski parem piirduda vaid linnupettega.

Uus sõna:
linnupete = kerge (varahommikune) eine


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