fluid language - what kinds of sounds?

This forum is for constructed languages, both those invented by UniLang members and those already existing.

Moderators: Ashucky, Dormouse559

User avatar
Adina
Posts: 340
Joined: 2005-10-07, 5:03
Real Name: Sara
Gender: male
Location: US
Country: US United States (United States)
Contact:

fluid language - what kinds of sounds?

Postby Adina » 2006-01-20, 14:16

I read too many fanfictions.. But in one, it mentioned a non-existent language of the moon-people that was "very fluid and smooth, and it ran together so you couldn't tell whether she was saying one very long word or several shorter ones." What kinds of sounds would you see a language like that having?
http://saretaku.blogspot.com/ | saỉ-yọ-thnn hå : hope
And now also: | Lunarian

User avatar
Egein
Posts: 4382
Joined: 2004-08-15, 21:56
Real Name: Étienne Poisson
Gender: male
Location: Í útlöndum
Country: CA Canada (Canada)
Contact:

Postby Egein » 2006-01-20, 18:06

the words should have somekind of endentment in the end, so words can seem to be one long word.

ex:
C-V-C+V

so, out of nowhere, let's say

telom + a vowel
sadil + a vowel
bowyr
=
tolomesadilibowyr

I don't know, this is probably a bad exemple.
Ok nevermind.

One thing you can do is try to make the language stressless, or have it a complex system of stress which goes over phraes, not only over words, and not use to many k-p-t, because those are stops.
(is)(fi)
Nouse pois nokinen poika / nokiselta nuotiolta / havuisilta vuoteilta /pihkaisilta pään aloilta
www.flickr.com/otsebmi

doctrellor
Posts: 16
Joined: 2006-01-16, 2:36
Real Name: Kevin Urbanczyk
Gender: male
Location: Minneapolis
Country: US United States (United States)

Postby doctrellor » 2006-01-21, 1:14

I'll give an example from 1 of my conlangs..

Nd’iintemambәnjaŋ

which is 'To be completely lost in thought"

the root has 2 verbs, a verb->noun conversion affix, a locative, and an intensifier.. so basically 5 things

1 thing I do when an "odd" C cluster hits is to drop the first C and lengthen the preceeding vowel...

As far as the p,t,k series.. I'd agree with the lack of hard stops.

User avatar
culúrien
Posts: 4742
Joined: 2005-07-15, 1:53
Gender: female
Country: US United States (United States)

Postby culúrien » 2006-01-21, 3:59

I think quenya (tolkien's elvish language) is pretty fluid, as well as sindarin (his other elvish language). I haven't studied it much, but from what I can tell, it uses a large number of vowels for endings, and starts of words. I might research it to see if I can pull up anything for you.
استیسی

User avatar
Adina
Posts: 340
Joined: 2005-10-07, 5:03
Real Name: Sara
Gender: male
Location: US
Country: US United States (United States)
Contact:

Postby Adina » 2006-01-22, 1:09

Thanks for the suggestions! ^_^

As for the CVCV thing, could it also work VCVC / VCVCV? Or would that be weird...? And Egein, could you give an example of the complex-stress system..? That sounds really interesting!

1 thing I do when an "odd" C cluster hits is to drop the first C and lengthen the preceeding vowel...
Is that what French does? I remember a friend saying something about French dropping consonants depending on something to do with vowels..

Tolkein's Elvish languages are so pretty! :D I love them. And I think they were the first conlangs I'd ever heard of...
http://saretaku.blogspot.com/ | saỉ-yọ-thnn hå : hope

And now also: | Lunarian

doctrellor
Posts: 16
Joined: 2006-01-16, 2:36
Real Name: Kevin Urbanczyk
Gender: male
Location: Minneapolis
Country: US United States (United States)

Postby doctrellor » 2006-01-22, 2:08

Adina wrote:
1 thing I do when an "odd" C cluster hits is to drop the first C and lengthen the preceeding vowel...
Is that what French does? I remember a friend saying something about French dropping consonants depending on something to do with vowels..



Not sure if French does that.. I just thought it was an easier way to keep the sound and flow of the words that I wanted

User avatar
Sirach
Posts: 109
Joined: 2005-12-11, 20:01
Real Name: Kevyn
Gender: male
Location: Surrey, British Columbia / Colombie Britannique
Country: CA Canada (Canada)
Contact:

Postby Sirach » 2006-01-24, 8:04

doctrellor wrote:
Adina wrote:
1 thing I do when an "odd" C cluster hits is to drop the first C and lengthen the preceeding vowel...
Is that what French does? I remember a friend saying something about French dropping consonants depending on something to do with vowels..



Not sure if French does that.. I just thought it was an easier way to keep the sound and flow of the words that I wanted



Sort of.

When you want to say 'handsome man,' you can not, for example, say 'beau homme,' but instead you would say 'bel homme.' Instead of 'ce orage' or the storm, you would say 'cet orage'.

The conlang above reminded me of Inuktitut. All the agglutination makes one large word into its own sentence, although by sounds, it is quite staccato!


Quizá.

Cuando queréis decir un 'hombre guapo,' no podéis, por ejemplo, decir 'beau homme,' pero otramente vosotros diríais 'bel homme.' En lugar de 'ce orage' o la tormenta, diríais 'cet orage'.

El conlang de arriba me hizó pensar el Inuktitut. Toda la aglutinación hace una larga palabra como un frase, aunque per sonidos, ¡es muy staccato!


Peut-être.

Quand on veut dire 'le bel homme,' on ne peut pas, par exemple, dire 'beau homme,' mais au lieu de ça, on dirait 'bel homme.' Au lieu de 'ce orage,' on dirait 'cet orage'.

Il fallait penser de l'Inuktitut par le conlang au-dessus. Tout de l'agglutinement fait un grand mot comme une phrase, quoique par les sons, c'est très staccato!


Eble.

Kiam oni volas diri 'la bela viro,' oni ne povas diri ekzemple, 'beau homme,' sed anstataŭe, oni dirus 'bel homme'. Anstataŭ 'ce orage,' aŭ sturmo oni dirus 'cet orage'.

Mi pensis pri la Inuktitut kiam mi volis la planlingvo supren. Ĝia tuta vortblokkonstruaĵo grandvortiĝas kiel frazo, kvankam ĝiaj sonoj balbutigas!

doctrellor
Posts: 16
Joined: 2006-01-16, 2:36
Real Name: Kevin Urbanczyk
Gender: male
Location: Minneapolis
Country: US United States (United States)

Postby doctrellor » 2006-01-24, 14:35

Sirach wrote:
doctrellor wrote:
Adina wrote:
1 thing I do when an "odd" C cluster hits is to drop the first C and lengthen the preceeding vowel...
Is that what French does? I remember a friend saying something about French dropping consonants depending on something to do with vowels..



Not sure if French does that.. I just thought it was an easier way to keep the sound and flow of the words that I wanted



The conlang above reminded me of Inuktitut. All the agglutination makes one large word into its own sentence, although by sounds, it is quite staccato!




Staccato, isn't that short and choppy?

as far as be like Inuktitut, that is one of the things I wanted to do..


Return to “Conlangs”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest