Atlak preview

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Jonne
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Atlak preview

Postby Jonne » 2006-01-07, 14:18

Okay I wanted to try creating a conlang once and came up with this :oops: Its name is Atlak and I'll give you a sample of it in three variates/dialects.

Standard Atlak is written in an abjad, but i can only include a transliteration. Leth Atlak is written in Latin alphabet with some additional letters and Soth Atlak in a special alphabet designed for it :P

Standard:
Innu tzareh jeint’adayten carze e čaterce erzačhes e đimaračhes. Hësente átayaten meryame seħis e hësen tġer tagare antecir saenċič abđiahá.

Soth Atlak:
Kol el-tzar sa-khrowait f-zhang e f-chatere f-razi e f-đakha`en. Takiro hum el-ŗatho e taagarejahum reishi lakole fi-l-gkaree l-khadt.

Leth Atlak:
Káđa shar yevaint libre é equál hán razi é đaháin. Hes kainđá il t’hey é il rathó é devanhes tagar antecir inil sánch abeada.


"Standard Atlak"'s grammar has been influenced mainly by Arabic, Finnish and Japanese, and writing system by Hebrew, Armenian and Chinese. It doesn't have lots of loan words.. but those it has came from Arabic and Finnish (but they have been 'atlakised' ie. sayyaara -> seara, ħaliib -> ħlëb)

"Soth Atlak" has many loan words from Arabic and its grammar is also very similar to Arabic in some parts.

"Leth Atlak" has lots of loan words from Romance languages, but it's grammar is more similar to Standard Atlak's grammar.

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Egein
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Postby Egein » 2006-01-07, 22:00

your standard atlak seems to have alot of e's (25).
I think i'm confused as for how to pronounce it. I think words seem to have a nice structure.

And jonne I pronounce it [jonne].
(is)(fi)
Nouse pois nokinen poika / nokiselta nuotiolta / havuisilta vuoteilta /pihkaisilta pään aloilta
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Jonne
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Postby Jonne » 2006-01-07, 22:06

Egein wrote:your standard atlak seems to have alot of e's (25).
I think i'm confused as for how to pronounce it. I think words seem to have a nice structure.

And jonne I pronounce it [jonne].


Haha mm yea it has lots of vowels. I will post a pronunciation guide or something tomorrow :p it's pretty much pronounced as written.

And yes, you pronounce my name right :D

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Jonne
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Postby Jonne » 2006-01-08, 11:44

Ok, pronuciation of Standard Atlak:

a - short ah sound (like spanish or finnish a)
á - same as above, but long
e - short eh sound, like in bet or get.
é - same as above, but long (not long ii)
i - short ih as in sit
í - long ii as in feet
o - short oh sound (like spanish or finnish o)
ó - same as above, but long
u - short uh sound (like spanish or finnish u)
ú - long uu as in foot
ë - schwa
eu - as french eu
ê - same as above, but long (ê=eueu)
ä - as in cat or bag
ã - long ä (ã=ää)

b - as in english
c - very short ts, similar to japanese tsu
c’- c with an h-sound
ċ - like ummh like c but your tongue is totally against palate :?
ċ’ - same as above, but with an h-sound after it
č - as english ch
č’ - as english ch with an h-sound (čh)
d - as in english
đ - dental d, or th as in then
f - as in english
g - as in english
ġ - as arabic ghayn..pretty similar to french r
ǧ - not pronounced at all. it is only used to give a very very short pause between two vowels (or more like gliding from a vowel to another.. as in finnish vaa'alla)
` - as arabic ayn
ħ - hard h, as in arabic
j - as french j
j' - j+h
k - as in english, but no aspiration
k’ - k with an h-sound.
kh - like german ch but harder
l - like in arabic or finnish (not soft as in english)
m - as in english
n - as in english
ŋ - ng in sing
p - as in english, but no aspiration
p’ - p+h
q - as arabic qaf (let your tongue rest down and say k)
r - rolled r as in finnish or spanish
ŗ - not so rolled r.. between spanish and english r.
s - as in english
š - sh as in she
t - like finnish t (or english, but no aspiration)
ŧ - th as in teeth
t’ - t+h
dt - hard and long tt
v - as in english
w - as in english
y - as in english
z - as in english (zoo)

possible diphthongs:

ae ao ai au aé aí aó aú áe ái áo
ei ea eu eí eá eú éi éu
ie ia ié iá ië ieu
ou oa oá óa
ua uo ue uá uó ué
eui
äi

STRESS

difficult to explain, look at examples:

deram derám ram
sh`ačiia
kataba taba kaba kata
dire di re
yiġideryamtenteyčãn

šadiya but if you add a suffix šadiyante

CV
CVC
CVCV
CVCVC
CVCVCV
CVCVCVCV
CVCCVC
CCVC
VCCVCVC
CVVCCVC

(there are other possibilities too)

So basically it's on the syllable second to last..or on the last. if the word has a syllable with a long vowel, it usually gets the stress (except if another syllable has a much stronger consonant. compare y vs. j')

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Postby doctrellor » 2006-01-16, 2:52

lots of vowels, and diphthongs.. reminiscent of Finnish with it's 18 diphthongs...

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Jonne
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Postby Jonne » 2006-01-17, 17:25

oh haha.. i like vowels :p

thought of explaining sth about verbs.

basically the verb conjugation is very easy.

person (subject) (+ mood) (+ future tense marker) + verb stem + tense (+object (person) (+ other suffixes)

For example:
I could have seen you too.

yiġideryamtenteycãn

and the infinitive is deram.

yi=prefix for "I"
ġi=the conditional marker
deryam= deram conjugated into past tense
ten=suffix for perfect tense
tey=suffix/prefix for "you"
cãn=suffix meaning "too"

There are 7 infinitives, four aspects, three moods and four fixed 'bodies' (like if you change deram (to see) to deráma, it means 'to be seen').

Basic conjugation (infinitives) of deram:

Infinitive I: Deram *basic stem*
Infinitive II: Deramëte *for present conjugations*
Infinitive III: Deryam *the stem for all past conjugations*
Infinitive IV: Deryamt *for imperfect conjugations*
Infinitive V: Deryamten *for perfect conjugations*
Infinitive VI: Ándram *for future conjugations*
Infinitive VII: šánidrëm *special one, used rarely only in some special kind of sentences*



PERSONAL PRONOUNS and theri suffixes/prefixes

English-Atlak (prefix/suffix)
I - Sey (yi-,ye- / -ey)
You - Tey (te- / -te, -tey)
S/he - Hey (he- / -he)
We - Asen (sen- / -sen)
You - Tësen (tes- / -tes)
They - Hësen (hes- / -hes)

possessive prefixes are used only in verbs (I did that and that)
and suffixes in verbs (I saw you) and in cases such as My book is better than his book

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Egein
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Postby Egein » 2006-01-17, 18:29

Haha, used in some special kind of sentance?

:? :)
(is)(fi)
Nouse pois nokinen poika / nokiselta nuotiolta / havuisilta vuoteilta /pihkaisilta pään aloilta
www.flickr.com/otsebmi

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Jonne
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Postby Jonne » 2006-01-17, 18:41

Egein wrote:Haha, used in some special kind of sentance?

:? :)


Loll exactly :lol: Ok, used rarely only in a couple of sentences ('what are you doing' 'i see something' for example)


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