Deyryck/Dèyrik

This forum is for constructed languages, both those invented by UniLang members and those already existing.

Moderators: Ashucky, Dormouse559

User avatar
Aquila Ex Machina
Posts: 36
Joined: 2015-07-19, 9:51
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Aquila Ex Machina » 2015-07-19, 19:42

Hi there, I'd like to introduce you my most advanced conlang : Deyryck or Dèyrik.

Why is there two different spelling?
Actually Deyryck is the original spelling I gave to this language whereas Dèyrik is the way it is spelled with the language itself (or actually with the keyboard translation of its alphabet).


Context :

The Deyryck is, before everything, a language that is used in my conworld. It is supposed to be an interstellar language that can be used by any species anywhere at anytime. This involve some weird way to deal with some words.

It is the official language of the Ikian empire which is the greatest interstellar empire in my conworld. The exact name of this language is "Tahari Dèyrik" which would be translated : "The earthly Deyryck". It is the last form (but definitely not the first) of this language and is introduced during the same time the earth's been created.


Phonology :

Basically the Dèyrik is able to translate any sound you want, but let's take it that it can't for now.

The consonants are divided into two type of categories : weak-ones and strong-ones. Each weak-ones is corresponding to a strong-ones (this isn't true in the opposite way)

The strong-ones :

Image

As it is in french, here's the translation of the headers :
IPA / Keyboard / Examples / Ryck

Examples aren't that much useful for they're in french (except for some of them).
Ryck is the name of the alphabet.


The weak-ones :


Image

As you might see another column appear in this picture.
This column is the corresponding "strong-ones" column.


These weak-ones can also have weaker-ones corresponding to them :

Image

And then comes the vowels :

Image



Pronouns :

I'll come back to them later as they're quiet more complicate than what I'm going to show here, but here they are :

  • I : First person singular (I)
  • Ti : Second person singular (You)
  • Aro : Third person singular (He or She)
  • Cèr/Tcèr : First person plural (We)
  • Lo : Second person plural (You (pl))
  • Arès : Third person plural (They)
  • Idéta (Id) : Third person singular imp (It)
  • Gû : Impersonal pronoun (It)

Now, these pronoun are in most of the case the same every where.
So "I" might translate I, Mine, Me, My, and so on.
Lag ta lag é kén ta kén é i tay lag é

Koko
Posts: 5257
Joined: 2013-11-29, 6:50
Real Name: Jon Stockman
Gender: male
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Koko » 2015-07-19, 22:26

Welcome! :D

The phonology and orthography resembles French a lot. Was this the intent?

Interesting use of the grave for nasal vowels.

User avatar
Aquila Ex Machina
Posts: 36
Joined: 2015-07-19, 9:51
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Aquila Ex Machina » 2015-07-19, 22:47

Orthography :
Definitely intended. I'm french, and the orthography you're referring to is only a way to translate the real characters in a computer-proof way. So I made it the most instinctive way I could.

The phonology, yes and no.
First of all, I'd like to precise, many of these sounds can actually be pronounced in many ways. (e.g. w : /w/ /r/) And I choose the IPA representation that was closer to the sounds I'm used to. (french) But the Deyryck is not a phonologically precise or strict language. So it isn't intended and isn't really truly french like in facts, but that comes form what I'm used to.
(In fact, I think it orally tends more to Japanese)

Thanks for welcoming! :)
Lag ta lag é kén ta kén é i tay lag é

Koko
Posts: 5257
Joined: 2013-11-29, 6:50
Real Name: Jon Stockman
Gender: male
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Koko » 2015-07-19, 22:57

Definitely intended. I'm french, and the orthography you're referring to is only way to translate the real characters in a computer-proof way. So I made it the most instinctive way I could.

Oh yeah! I completely overlooked the fact that you have a conscript :P

Hmm, you mention it's an interstellar language, so is Dèyrik a constructed lingua franca of the conuniverse? Or is it the language of a popular world that became the lingua franca?

User avatar
Aquila Ex Machina
Posts: 36
Joined: 2015-07-19, 9:51
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Aquila Ex Machina » 2015-07-19, 23:12

I think to understand I must go a bit the conworld's history.

At the creation of the universe, in order to have their species communicating one with another, the gods taught them a language : "Dèymaat". Then the universe was split into two different part, one where the world was still under the control of the god and another where the mortals are on their own.
This lead to a new language : Dèykrik.
Why is that? Because the Deymaat wasn't the language of the species that weren't under control of the gods. Plus another godlike species came the universe with their own language. These two fact lead to the creation of this language.
This one evolved with the native language of the species that arrived after that with their own civilization. And it became the first Deyryck. Which was born with the ikian empire.

So Deyryck is a basically a mix between Katakar (the language from the other godlike species), the Deymaat, the Dèykrik and the other main language of the time : Ikji and Fikji.
It then started to be influenced by other smaller languages and by the peoples speaking it and became the Tahari Dèyrik.

Does that answer your question? Am I clear? (sorry if not^^)
Lag ta lag é kén ta kén é i tay lag é

Koko
Posts: 5257
Joined: 2013-11-29, 6:50
Real Name: Jon Stockman
Gender: male
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Koko » 2015-07-19, 23:20

Yes! It answers it extremely well ^^

Thank you.

I'd be interested in seeing more of it, 'cause it seems promising ^^

User avatar
Aquila Ex Machina
Posts: 36
Joined: 2015-07-19, 9:51
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Aquila Ex Machina » 2015-07-19, 23:22

It's on its way. I hope I'm not to disappoint you.
Lag ta lag é kén ta kén é i tay lag é

User avatar
Aquila Ex Machina
Posts: 36
Joined: 2015-07-19, 9:51
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Aquila Ex Machina » 2015-07-20, 0:20

Basic sentence

A simple sentence in Deyryck use the OSV order.

The subject is attached to verb and goes at the end of the sentence or proposition it's the subject of.

Example :

I love you. = Ti ilaka (laka=love)

Now, this sentence isn't correct yet. It miss a dot. The punctuation is audible in Dèyrik.
Here it is :

. = a
, = o
! = u
? = an
?! = un
,? = on

Now, let's make our previous sentence correct : Ti ilaka a.

Filian's way

Deyryck has many types of word. The most important of them is the filian group. A filian word can be easily recognize as it's ending with an "a" in its verbal form. Those words can have many forms.

Let's keep going with the word "Laka". As a verb, it's ending with an "a", we deduce from that that it is filian.

We can deduce these forms :

Laka : to love
Lakam : love
Laki(os) : loving/loved
Laki(a)s : lover (boyfriend/girlfriend)
Lakit(ohos) : more loved
Lakot(ohos) : less loved
Alakit(ohos) : most loved
Alakot(ohos) : least loved
Lakat(ahas) : best lover ~husband/wife

(The part in parenthesis isn't necessary, using only what's outside of them is called the "short form" or contracted form)

As I said, the pronoun can be use for any form.
In order to say "My lover", you'll just say "Ilakis".

If I've been clear enough so far, this sentence is understandable :

Ilakis tilaka an
Do you love my girlfriend/boyfriend?

Plural

The plural in Dèyrik is quiet easy to master. It works by adding an "n" at the end of a word.
As this wouldn't mean lot of things with love, let's take the word "dajarkam" (house).

Dajarkam = house
So
Dajarkamn = houses

Still some forms has some contractions.

Dajarkamn will become Dajarkan
Dajarkiasn if used in its short form (Dajarkisn) will become Dajarkin
Lag ta lag é kén ta kén é i tay lag é

Koko
Posts: 5257
Joined: 2013-11-29, 6:50
Real Name: Jon Stockman
Gender: male
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Koko » 2015-07-20, 0:58

You did not disappoint ;)

I have a question on "laki(os)": when is it loving and when is it loved?

How are different tenses and moods formed? And, sorry for yet another question :P , what kind of aspects do you have?

User avatar
Aquila Ex Machina
Posts: 36
Joined: 2015-07-19, 9:51
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Aquila Ex Machina » 2015-07-20, 10:33

Loving/Loved :

Each word has its main meaning, though many times there multiple of them. In this case it's the adjective form. The main meaning is "loved". Which mean that basically laki=loved. Though, depending on the situation it might mean "loving". I can't exactly define these situations, it depends on the context.
Now, it is possible to precise which meaning you want to use. When there's only two different meanings, you can use "-sµa" to force the other meaning.

So here, laki = loved ; lakisµi = loving.

The use of this prefix can be way more complex, but I'll come back to that a bit later as there are dozens of forms to introduce. (e.g. lakisµai : lovable; lakisµoi : with love~)

Now...

Tenses, Moods, Aspects :

I will probably forgot some of them, but let's try.

First of all, Dèyrik has its own way of describing these three. These are put in the same bag, but I'll try to stay clear.

Tenses :

Tenses in Dèyrik are, as usual, split into two parts : the simple-ones, the complex-ones.
They somehow always work the same, they're prefix.

Here are the simple ones :

Past : -pa
Future : -pôn
Conditional : -prôn
Imperative : -pèrprôn (this one is mostly to give advice)

Which would lead to these sentences :

Ti ilaka a : I love you.
Ti ilakapa a : I loved you.
Ti ilakapôn a : I'll love you.
Ti ilakaprôn a : I'd love you.
Ti ilakapèrprôn : I should/better love you.

Now, imperative is considered a simple tense (though it's more a mood I think) and it has three forms. I've already shown one, here are the two others :

Imperative for order :

This one will change the pronoun attached to the verb. I did not introduce the "mi" yet, though let's assume it is another pronoun.

Here are the changes :

  • I => Ko/Khi
  • Ti => Ki
  • Aro => Karo
  • Cèr/Tcèr => Kcèr/Ktcèr
  • Lo => Klo
  • Arès => Karès
  • Id => Kid
  • Gû => Kû
  • Mi => Kmi

As you can see except for three pronouns, it simply adds a "k" before it. The first two are remains of the past. (I used to be "o" and Ti used to be "i") And well, pronouncing "Kgû" is enough to understand how it ended "kû". ^^

So we'll have :

I kilaka a = Love me!

Imperative for slang :

As said the title, this one is almost everywhere part of the slang. There's only three forms :

2pers.sing : é
1pers.plur : û
2pers.plur : è

These letters will replace the "a" at the end of the verb, or if the "a" at the end of the sentence.

Example :

Ada = to be quiet

Adé = shut up!


The complex ones :

They still work the same. Many of them are NOT tense in the common sense, though they're part of the same group in this language.

Ti ilakaho a = I don't love you anymore. (not anymore)
Ti ilaka a = I already love you. (already)
Ti ilakaha a = I still love you. (still)
Ti ilaka a = I love you again. (again)
Ti ilakapo a = I now love you. (the action/state is new)
Ti ilakako a = Loving you ... (I don't know yet how to explain this one, even in french, I'll come back to it later. ^^)

And the last two are used only to form sentences with more than one proposition :

Lakassé iada a = While I'm in love, I'm silent. (if no subject to the first verb, the subject is the one of the main sentence)
Tilakassé iada a = While you're in love, I'm silent. (here the first verb has a subject, no problem)

I lakapso tiada a = You, who love me, are silent.


Now, let's get to the "fun" part with the ...

Aspects :

I'm calling it aspects right now (and I'm not sure they are ^^"), though once again, in Dèyrik, these are still tenses.


First of all, it is possible to have many tenses stick one to the other, even the same tense :

Ti ilakapa a = I loved you.
Ti ilakapapa a = I've been loving you.


It is also important to introduce two important think of the Dèyrik : ô and sôz.

Ô

Ô is there to "close". What do I mean by that?

In this sentence :

I love you.

You're not saying you're only in love with "you". That's what Dèyrik call "open".
Let's translate :

Ti ilaka a

Now these two possible sentences :

Ôti ilaka a = I love only you. (only you is loved)

Ti iôlaka a = I only love you. (you is only loved)

This is applicable to tense.

Ti ilakaôpa a = I used to love you.
Because the action/state is in the past and only in the past. In fact you could even translate : I used to love you and never will again.

ôko

This little tense I have trouble to explain can also serve has the present tense. When closed that's the value it has.

So :

Ti ilakaôko a = I love you (but didn't, and probably won't).


Sôz

Sôz is there to create the opposite idea. Dèyrik insist the difference between contrary and opposite.

Let's say I say : I don't love you.

(oh, btw negation is introduced by "-nis" prefix, which comes at the end of the tenses)

In english this sentence does not illustrate as in french the problem, but let's take : "I don't like you.".

Here you somehow or sometimes mean you dislike the person.

The sentence : "Ti ilékonis a" (I don't like you) will never say that in Dèyrik.
It'll always simply mean that you don't particularly appreciate the person.

Now, this sentence :

Ti isôzléko a
Definitely means you dislike the person.

Now, guess what, it can be attached to the tenses.

Though, it doesn't exactly work the you could imagine it would work. It quiet complicate to use.
We could imagine that "sôzpa" = "pôn". While it doesn't. In fact it's closer to "ha".

I'd have to describe each one to be precise but I'll do it a bit later, 'cause I'm lazy. :p


And then comes ...

Bui -> Bô

The word's "bui" but it'll be used here in the form of "bô".

Bô is wearing the idea the action/state is over. And its second form "Bôn" is there to push the action in the time.
In order to be used, they're place in the beginning of the proposition.

Two examples :
Bô ti ilakapa a = I used to love. (I don't anymore, but maybe after)
Bôn ti ilakapa = I loved you a long time ago.

Now... Bô and Bôn are tenses, which means....

Sôzbô ti ilakapa a = I loved you and still do.
Sôzbôn ti ilakapa a = I recently fall in love with you.

Ôbô ti ilakapa a = ... I don't know how to translate this, but I've the idea. ^^"
Ôbôn ti ilakapa a = I only loved you a long time ago.

Bôpa ti ilakapa a = I used to be in love with, but I stopped. (both loved and stopped loving in the past)

And so on.

There are other way to form tenses. Technically there's just an infinity of tenses in Dèyrik (or at least to many possibility for me to count). ^^

Tell me if I forgot anything and if I'm not clear, which would not surprise me. ^^
Last edited by Aquila Ex Machina on 2015-07-20, 20:52, edited 1 time in total.
Lag ta lag é kén ta kén é i tay lag é

Koko
Posts: 5257
Joined: 2013-11-29, 6:50
Real Name: Jon Stockman
Gender: male
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Koko » 2015-07-20, 18:56

Oh my! :lol: That is one intricate verb system!

I got a little lost at some parts, but you've already done enough explaining I think I'll just try to make sense of them myself ;)

Ada = to whist (not absolutely sure^^")

The infinitive of "shut up!" is "to shut up" ;)

User avatar
Aquila Ex Machina
Posts: 36
Joined: 2015-07-19, 9:51
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Aquila Ex Machina » 2015-07-20, 19:27

Koko wrote:
Ada = to whist (not absolutely sure^^")

The infinitive of "shut up!" is "to shut up" ;)


Yeah but the "shut up" is quiet "slangy". It's the third imperative that makes it be this way, it's infinitive mustn't. Any idea?

Koko wrote:Oh my! :lol: That is one intricate verb system!



I agree. If not to answer your question I would have explain all that at once. ^^
Lag ta lag é kén ta kén é i tay lag é

Koko
Posts: 5257
Joined: 2013-11-29, 6:50
Real Name: Jon Stockman
Gender: male
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Koko » 2015-07-20, 20:32

I am not sure what else you could use :hmm: I don't think I've ever heard "whist" ^^

You could say "to be quiet." It's common in a variety of situations, so that'd be best, probably.

User avatar
Aquila Ex Machina
Posts: 36
Joined: 2015-07-19, 9:51
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Aquila Ex Machina » 2015-07-20, 20:53

I change for "to be quiet".

Is there anything you'd like me to introduce next?
Lag ta lag é kén ta kén é i tay lag é

Koko
Posts: 5257
Joined: 2013-11-29, 6:50
Real Name: Jon Stockman
Gender: male
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Koko » 2015-07-20, 21:00

Aquila Ex Machina wrote:Is there anything you'd like me to introduce next?

Nothing in particular ^^ I don't have any other curiosities.

User avatar
Aquila Ex Machina
Posts: 36
Joined: 2015-07-19, 9:51
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Aquila Ex Machina » 2015-07-20, 21:09

Fine. :)
Lag ta lag é kén ta kén é i tay lag é

User avatar
Aquila Ex Machina
Posts: 36
Joined: 2015-07-19, 9:51
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Aquila Ex Machina » 2015-07-21, 14:45

A bit more of phonology.

Double consonant :

If two same consonants follow each others, the first one will be pronounced :

  • /t/ : if they're a strong-one different from "t"
  • /d/ : if they're a weak-one or weaker-one different from "d" or "q"
  • /k/ : if they're a "t"
  • /g/ : if they're a "d" or a "q"


Examples :

Nassé : /natse/
Natté : /nakte/
Nallé : /nadle/
Naddé : /nagde/

Now, what if they're are three or more following each other. That might happen, in this case they're forming group of two from the last to the first.

Examples :

Nasssé : /nastse/
Nassssé : /natstse/ (Though you're really looking for trouble if you managed to find yourself with such a string of consonants)

Access and Auxiliary :


The strong-ones have two sub-divisions : access and auxiliary.

If you wanna know what the character looks like next to its corresponding strong-one, I'm inviting you to take a look at the table at the beginning of this topic.

The "µ" is the access of the "R".
The "ç" is the auxiliary of the "S"


I'll come to what an access can change to the phonology later. Let's start with the auxiliaries. It's quiet simple, they will never be used themselves in normal Dèyrik. Though, these are other pronunciation that their corresponding strong-ones can have.
Which means an "S" can pronounced the way a "ç" would be.

Characters preceded by an apostrophe :

You haven't seen any of those but still, these characters exist :

'o / 'a / 'c / 'j

This means they can have multiple pronunciation.
Here they are :

  • 'o = /o/ /on/ /ɔ̃/ /ɔ̃n/
  • 'a = /a/ /an/ /ã/ /ãn/
  • 'c = /ʃ/ /tʃ/
  • 'j = /ʒ/ /dʒ/

Now, these aren't often use and every word that can use these character can be written with their simple equivalents.
In the original alphabet they're just crossed.

/!\ The pronunciation never changed the meaning except for one word : 'cèr.
Technically you know it already, it's one of the pronoun. I said earlier it could be "Tcèr" or "Cèr" (which is correct) but it is basically " 'cèr".
But these aren't exactly the same.
Cèr is exclusive while Tcèr is inclusive.
Lag ta lag é kén ta kén é i tay lag é

User avatar
Aquila Ex Machina
Posts: 36
Joined: 2015-07-19, 9:51
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Aquila Ex Machina » 2015-07-26, 9:58

BEFORE YOU READ THIS PART :

Deyryck doesn't call anything I call here "verbs". I only use the term here in order to help understand what seems like a verb. Yet, there is no proper distinctions between verbs, nouns, adjectives, etc... We only talk about "words".

Verbs

Deyryck can divide verbs into three main category of verbs.

Basic Verbs

Filian verbs

These are somehow the most common verb, but not necessarily the most used. It is the verbal (basic) form of a filian verb, which end with an "a". Use them is easy, this is the simple way, involving having them at the end with their subject if they have one.

Examples :

Ata = to help

Ti iata a = I help you.

Arès tiata iata a = I help you to help them.


"O" verbs

They have the same function, though they're "o" words. "O" words are simply words ending with an "o", such as "Imio" (world). They're quiet annoying as all their forms end with this same "o". I'll come back to them later.

Contractible Verbs

A contractible verb is verb that can be contracted and put at the end of an other verbs.

Simple contractible verbs

The most common of them. There are three of them.
Here they are :

  • Vèyli (contracted : -li) = to want
  • Kréi (contracted : -réi) = to can/be able to
  • Démo (contracted : -mo) = to must/have to

They're "simple" because they've got only one meaning, they keep their meaning while being contracted.

Examples :

Ti iatali a = I wanna help you.
Ti iataréi a = I can help you.
Ti iatamo a = I must help you.


Complex contractible verbs

There also are three of them :

  • Fio (contracted : -fia/â/o/ô) = to see
  • Kèrkéi (contracted : -kéi) = to understand
  • Kohos (contracted : -hos) = to go/come

These are complex as hen contracted they don't keep their meaning. Now, the first one in this list, is the most difficult to get.

The first thing to know is that "a" and "o" are the singular of "â" and "ô".
Now, the "a" oppose "you" and "I", which means if "I" is the subject of the sentence, the actual subject will be "you".
"O" will serve for the third person in those cases.

If the third person is the subject of the class, '"o" is for the first person and "a" for the second.
And the meaning is "to be seen" (somehow).

I hope the examples will help :

Ti iatafia a = You see me helping you.
Ti iatafiâ a = You(pl) see me helping you(sg).

Ti iatafio a = He sees me helping you.
Ti iatafiô a = They see me helping you.

Ti aroatafio a = I see him helping you.
Ti aroarafia a = You see him helping you.

I hope I was clear enough. ^^"


Now, the two others are way more easy to get.

-Kéi will replace "to can" or "to know how to"

-Hos means the action or states is undergoing.

Examples :


Ti iatakéi a = I can help you. (I know how to help you.)
(A better example would be "I can swim")

Ti iatahos a = I'm helping you.


Unofficial contractible verbs

These are other sometimes-contracted verbs that may be used. There are many depending on where you are and this is consider slang. Though, here's one of them :

Safa (contracted : "-fa") = "to know"
It's a simple verb so :

Ti iatafa a = I know I'm helping you.


========


One last thing to know about these verbs is that their contracted forms are often used even if not at the end of another verb (except for "fio" of course^^).

Example :

Aro tiata ili a = I want you to help him.



Verbal forms

Even though this isn't hard to get, this part is quiet a massive part of the Deyryck and I won't be dealing with everything here. Here's the main rule : "Basically everything in the Deyryck is verbal form".

Non-verbal verbal forms

These are part of what I call the contraction of idea.
Agaqam means Light, so Agaqi means bright. And the verb "èr" means "to be".

So this sentence :

You're bright.

Should be translated :

Agaqi tièr a

Even though this translation isn't technically wrong, it'll never be used. It has to be translated :

Tiagaqi a

And this works for most of the forms :

Dajarkam = House
Idajarkam a = I am a house.

The punctuation

Every punctuation an be used as a verb. It can be useful in complex sentence to clarify the subject of the sentence. Instead of having it attached to the verb, you attach it to the point, or the comma. You can also also use them to wear tenses :

Tikohos apa = You've gone.
Tikohos é = Go!


The verbal comma

Still a punctuation, so why is there another part just to this one? Because it's not the same. The verbal comma is particular form. It happens when you put a comma at the very beginning of the sentence. Weird, huh?

Imagine someone's calling you for help but you have to finish something first? You'd say something like "I'm finishing what I'm doing, then I'm yours.". Well in Deyryck you'd simply say : "O iko a".

The function is simple, it implicitly involve something that happens, happened, or will happen before the action. Extrapolating, it can sometime be use to introduce a future.

Now, this is a verb, so it can have a subject, and tenses.
Another situation, your child wanna go outside but he must do the dishes first, you could say "Tio tiréi a". (Once you're done with [not precised but known as the dishes] you can.).

As you can see with this type of form, the Deyryck is mostly a contextual language.


Tenses

Every tenses are in fact verbs. In fact, they're sometimes seen as contractible verbs.

Here are some uses :

Aro tiatamo a (You must help him.)
Ihô a (I already did it.)

Tidajarkam idèr an (Is this you house?)
Idpa a (It used to be.)
Last edited by Aquila Ex Machina on 2016-12-18, 11:44, edited 1 time in total.
Lag ta lag é kén ta kén é i tay lag é

User avatar
Pasie
Posts: 143
Joined: 2015-07-14, 18:20
Real Name: Pasie
Gender: female
Country: CA Canada (Canada)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Pasie » 2015-08-31, 11:14

So... *mischevious face* Do you know your conlang well enough th translate this?
You are a one eyed duck standing on a plane

User avatar
Aquila Ex Machina
Posts: 36
Joined: 2015-07-19, 9:51
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Re: Deyryck/Dèyrik

Postby Aquila Ex Machina » 2016-12-18, 11:09

Sorry, I've been away for a long time, I didn't see your question!
Of course I can! :)

You are a one eyed duck standing on a plane

Vaayila privlissé aast'klûwi'har'kwoba tya

Vaayila : plane (or anything similar)

Privli : to be standing

aast : one

klûwi : adjective formed out of the contraction of "klûwikam" (the eye)

har' : complex key indicating a word from earth
kwoba : corresponding word for "duck".

tya : ti-èr-a : you are
Lag ta lag é kén ta kén é i tay lag é


Return to “Conlangs”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest