Isiota

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Koko
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Re: Isyan

Postby Koko » 2015-09-23, 3:38

A poem aboot the moon, with traditional starting alliteration ^^

Nödas 'Ndyevu Żopilnue Ne
Ża bijar kua blanżiue ne.
Brun bedo pios,
Sui nuen aksineu.
Atheyar, menyvedinar, nua
Żypreykeu un sölutar nikueu.
Żi eżio ment dievan dievar,
Yer eseu nua, Nujon.


Hello Dear Moon in the Sky
So beautiful up there are you.
At the end of that course,
You can show us yourself.
Bright, silver*, you are
Spectacular against that night sky**.
But here comes the yellow sun,
And so there goes you, Good Night.


* well, the Isyan actually has "orange-white" (light orange), since this is the usually colour of the main moon (about which the poem is written), but this has a very awkward feel in English
** [lit.] "… you // are obvious with a sölutar darkness" (sölutar has no English equivalent, and is really hard for me to describe. A little bit purple, but dark and (very) slightly greenish)

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Pasie
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Re: Isyan

Postby Pasie » 2015-09-23, 11:59

Can i say sölutar is my favorite colour? :twisted: :twisted:
Imagine people say:
-My favourite colour is green
-Mine is blue
-Mine is sölutar
:twisted:

Koko
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Re: Isyan

Postby Koko » 2015-09-23, 22:24

Yay! My colour shall become known worldwide :twisted:

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Re: Isyan

Postby Koko » 2015-11-23, 8:11

Because I like putting my own life into Isyan (four or so words based on my last cold :lol: for example), I made these four words:

semba(a)— one you have romantic feelings for (so basically a crush)
iorda— a semba you think reciprocates those feelings (so I could call Italian both my semba and iorda ^^ )
asselvia— a semba you know doesn't feel the same about you as you them (which could very well also be Italian…)
asselvodja— someone you suspect has romantic feelings for you, but you don't feel that way for them

Just made this one up: asselviorda (or "iordasselvia")*— the Schrödinger's cat of sembaav (they both like and don't like you back)

* which is better?

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Re: Isyan

Postby Koko » 2016-10-16, 8:40

Just made these great new words:

kùrda -- friend, comrade
isżayellejan -- (both of government) to administer genocide, to terrorize; (of an individual) to become a complete savage and rape/abuse/thieve from another [indicates the lowest kind of bastard who unnecessarily harms another: nowadays not so used as "rape/abuse/forcefully take" but more as "to be a general ass"]
palistyn -- revolution
rojav(i) uncountable -- warrior(s) [rojav follows normal plural; rojavi follows -i declension]
merikkyejan -- to help the enemy [Amerika merikkyen, sże duglartu tal isbas ojöyar ke emen denniuen. - America aids the "terrorists," but goes and tells disgusting lies that other countries are the problem.]
kaipakkya -- a god among man, one who deserves a great deal of honour

Rojavi leż Rojavar kio vil ke nyot kaipakkye. -- Every soldier of Rojava is worthy of respect and honour, and will always be remembered for their fight.

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Re: Isyan

Postby Koko » 2018-02-04, 12:56

It's been a while since i've updated isyan..... by over a year :whistle: So with that in mind, note that there hasn't been a whole lot of development :lol:

Changes: anything having to do with "isya" has to do with "isiota" now, changed the name :3
where i used to have it so that whole sentences could be used in the place of objects (Mysi, sa nua neres spanyar mesj ozo. Mespannyuar.) it's no longer possible (pretty confusing the old way), so now ya'd say that sentence as either: Mysi, sa ozo nua neres spanyar mesj. Mespannyuar. or Mysi, nua neres spanyar mesj sa ozo. Mespannyuar. (Hey, I heard you say a spanish word. Do you speak spanish?)

A big development is that i did a lot of work on the prosody of the language this week. How pitch flows from one word to the next, how to mark questions with intonation (high pitch on stressed syllable of first word, and high pith on stressed syllable of last word). Emphasis is marked differently as well. Word order, intonation, or both can be used to "italicize" words in speech (hopefully ya know what i mean by that). The pitch of stressed syllables i've also dictated to generally be falling.

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Naava
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Re: Isyan

Postby Naava » 2018-02-04, 13:50

Koko wrote:How pitch flows from one word to the next

How did you do this? :hmm: Prosody is one of the things that was discussed very briefly years ago in one course and I don't think it's ever been mentioned again after that. So, I know very little about anything prosody-related, which is a bit problematic when I'm trying to make my conlang sound as natural as possible... :D Any tips? Good sources to learn more?

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Re: Isyan

Postby Koko » 2018-02-05, 0:51

Naava wrote:
Koko wrote:How pitch flows from one word to the next

How did you do this? :hmm: Prosody is one of the things that was discussed very briefly years ago in one course and I don't think it's ever been mentioned again after that. So, I know very little about anything prosody-related, which is a bit problematic when I'm trying to make my conlang sound as natural as possible... :D Any tips? Good sources to learn more?

I actually don't really know how to explain my process :lol: I just read a random sentence and tried to make it feel natural, but different from how I'd read it as if it were English. I know very little about prosody myself tbh, so I don't think I should be a model for conlang prosody. I just got inspired to work on a little bit of it for Isiota in one of my late night creative moods before bed and just kinda rolled with it the next day :)

If I was confident enough in my Isiot pronunciation I'd record a few example sentences, but unfortunately I still have much work to do in that regard :oops:

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Naava
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Re: Isyan

Postby Naava » 2018-02-05, 14:16

Koko wrote:I know very little about prosody myself tbh, so I don't think I should be a model for conlang prosody.

:lol: It's ok.

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Re: Isiota

Postby Dormouse559 » 2018-02-05, 15:48

Well, I do hope you tell us more about it in time. Prosody's a pretty uncommon subject for conlangers.
N'hésite pas à corriger mes erreurs.

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Re: Isiota

Postby Koko » 2018-02-06, 0:34

I still have a lot of work to do with the prosody, and clean it up a bit, but I will happily share it when i'm confident it's presentable enough ^-^

Koko
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Re: Isiota

Postby Koko » 2018-02-09, 13:01

I've change the basic SOV order to a basic VSO order. I just like that one more and it's much more becoming of Isiota.... I need to check if this decision will mess with my prosody for it now, oops :lol:

Also, realized that the conjugations on the first page are way wrong so here is attached a chart that shows the current indicative mood model. I used the verb avejan (-ejan being the infinitive suffix) to demonstrate the common stress pattern applied to verbs (marked with the acute accent), exceptions such as when the penultimate syllable's nucleus is y or ou in which case the stress will move to the antepenultimate (third-last) syllable such as with the verb malyvejan ("put on, dress/get into")
eg, Mályvu maukernu kastesj so dessajet. - "Lemme change into something more comfortable" (lit. "I will put on my past time clothes (while/after changing)")

On that sentence, the last word dessajet is the present participle of the verb dessejan plus the suffix -t which is a shortened form of the adverbial suffix -tu which is typically saved for participles to specify an adverbial meaning. Here it's used to indicate that the person is changing out of their current apparel and then putting on their comfortable clothes. Otherwise the sentence would mean they're either naked already, or they'll be putting clothes on top of the ones they're wearing right now.
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Koko
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Re: Isiota

Postby Koko » 2018-02-26, 9:05

I've started developing a sister language to Isiota, called Syet, and at face level it looks like a heavily simplified form of Isiota, but it actually developed separately in an Eastern region of the continent. It has only 2 numbers, 2 cases, and the spelling system is far less phonemic than Isiota. Diphthongs and other vowel sequences have been monophthized, and complex consonant clusters reduced to either geminates or single consonants.

Isiota: Se mesj <Ku utiu kozu> sze joyo lito.
[1-ACC.S say.0 | be-1s.FUT.IND there-DAT.S moment-DAT.S | but do.not-3s.PRES.IND still]
Syet: Mise pes misj <Onn k'es otiy kozu[*].> , si pes je yir.
[ˈmɪʃ(ə) pɛs miʒː| ˈʔɔŋkə soˈtiː koˈsːuː| ʃɪ pɛʒːə jɪɾ]
[say-3s.IND 3s.SUB QUOT.PART | FUT.PART be.1s=1s.SUB there moment-DAT.S | but 3s.SUB not-3s.IND still]
English: He said "I'll be there soon" but he's still not here.

EnglishSyetIsiota
I amS ekSa ka
CatLianLerana
SunDiyvDieva
Asshole,
rude person
YottLiùpta


Jabe ni se tou biyniy siy liano i ddiyvo.
[seem-3s.IND to 1s.OBL CNJ get-1p.IND 1p.SUB cat-OBL.S at sun-OBL.S]
Pra tal globeinui leranes dievu.
[think-1p.PRES.IND that obtain-1p.FUT.SUB cat-ACC.S-NDEF sun-DAT.S]
"I think we are getting a cat today."

The verb "jabiyn" exists in Isiota as well, in the form of "jabejan" but means only "seems like, resembles" (jabio sùna su. "It looks like a cloth to me.")

[*]kozu here is code-switching between Syet and Isiota. Syet has also borrowed words form Isiota, such as "misj" from mesj, making it solely a quotative.

EDIT: added glosses (to the best of my ability) to further show the difference between Syet and Isiota; aside from just vocabulary there are major grammatical differences


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