Volapük

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ILuvEire
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Re: Volapük

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-10-09, 2:09

Dawid wrote:sorry 4 making u wait teacher :P I had problems with my net...
my homework:
1. I live in Spain (shouldn't b 'lödob?')
2. My name is, I am ______. (Can b translated this way?)
3. I learn Volapük!
4. I want to read book, with my bro
5. Child pavisitom school.
what does 'pavisitom' mean?
next lesson please... :P

Extra points for catching my typo. :) Sorry 'bout that!

Visitön means to visit. p-[/p] is the passive voice marker, and [i]a- is the present tense marker. -om is the feminine affix.

Pavisitom: He is visiting.
Cil pavisitom jul - The child, (he) is visiting school.

The word for throat is gug.

V Reflexive Pronoun, Reciprocative Pronoun, Root structure
The reflexive pronoun in Volapük is ok. Here are some examples for how it is used:
Mütob oki lärnon - I make myself learn.
Flapom oki - He hits himself.
Flifükof ofi - She refreshes herself.

The reciprocative pronoun is od. Examples:
Löfofs odis - They love each other.
Logoms odis - They see each other.

Root Structure:
Every Volapük root starts and ends with a consonant. Always. No exceptions. Volapük rigik ("Classical" Volapük, Schleyer's original language lit. Language of-world original) progressed without his consent in some ways. A few roots beginning with vowels crept in, Ägüptän (Egypt) is one of quite a few examples. Arie de Jong converted these words to fit Volapük's original rules. (Ägüptän was changed to Lägüptän).

The other rule of Volapük roots is that they should be around one syllable long. They can be longer, but Schleyer preferred to keep the roots to just one syllable. Especially with verbs. Who wants to conjugate a four mile long verb with all of those roots. It would be very complicated!

Any root can be a noun, verb, adjective, or adverb. I can't really think of one that would fit in all the categories, but many fit in one or two. For example:
Pük: language
Pükön: to talk
Pükik: talkative
Pükiko: The adverb form of talkative.
Neither Pükik or pükiko are actually used in real life, but they are possible.

Ola Vödastok:
Pröns:
Sudel - Sunday
Mudel - Monday
Tudel - Tuesday
Vedel - Wednesday
Dödel - Thursday (from German Donnerstag)
Fridel - Friday
Zädel - Saturday

Värbs:
Flapön - to hit
Müton - to force, to compel
Vobädön - to make, to produce
Last edited by ILuvEire on 2008-10-10, 2:08, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Volapük

Postby Nukalurk » 2008-10-09, 4:35

Dödel! :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: In German it's either a stupid person or a name for both penis and dildo.

Sorry. :whistle:

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Re: Volapük

Postby Tenebrarum » 2008-10-09, 6:08

Much much much prettier than Esperanto.
!Chalice! Communion wafer of the tabernacle

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Re: Volapük

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-10-09, 22:20

Amikeco wrote:Dödel! :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: In German it's either a stupid person or a name for both penis and dildo.

Sorry. :whistle:

Hehe. So not a good word to use around me German teacher? I actually laughed out loud at that one.

I disagree with the word because it goes against one of Volapük's unwritten rules. A compound should have the first term in the genitive. So it should be Döadel.

:silly:

And, thanks Draven! It's always nice to see people who enjoy Volapük's look.
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Re: Volapük

Postby Nukalurk » 2008-10-09, 22:44

:whistle: It can be innocent but who knows, if your teacher knows all connotations. :mrgreen:

By the way, you made a mistake in your list of the weekdays: "Tudel - Wednesday" and the actual word for Wednesday is missing.

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Re: Volapük

Postby arpee » 2008-10-10, 1:25

This quote alone is what makes me want to learn Volapük:

"Volapük had no special philological merits to recommend it; yet, after a few years' incubation in south Germany, it spread, first to France (about 1885) and then in a few years over the whole civilized world, so that in 1889, when the third Volapük congress met at Paris, there were 283 Volapük societies all over the world, and the total number of Volapük students was estimated at over a million. At this congress every one - even the waiters - spoke Volapük, and the permanent triumph of the language seemed certain." - [1]1911encyclopedia

If Volapük was that good, to get that far, further in success than Esperanto had/has. I am 100% sure this language can (and will, with our efforts!) rise again!

a few (of many) of the unique features of Volapuk:

" Schleyer already knew more than 60 languages (although how well he spoke any of them, other than German, isn't clear; see "Umlauts"). In a year, he distilled his knowledge into a single, rational idiom. He called it Volapük, or "world-speech." He based its words on English roots, using a simplified phonetics that eliminated the sounds th and ch, and replaced the letter r (difficult for the Chinese) with the letter l. These changes made many of Schleyer's new words hard to recognize. You could, for example, look at the word flen for a long time and not guess that it was derived from the English friend... each letter stood for a distinct concept, and the meaning of a word was—in theory—evident from its spelling... ordinary people could both speak and understand Volapük, and many of them soon did. " - [2]Village Voice


What is my point? My point is, this proves that the world is (and have been since Volapük) ready for a global language. Volapük once had ~250,000 speakers! Compare to modern Esperanto which has ~100,000 speakers. Volapük had ~250% more speakers than Esperanto has!

We can, no, we will (us who appreciate Volapük) re-rise Volapük!

but first, I must learn the language myself...


Here are some suggestions for spreading Volapük:

1. Make Volapük media (Videos, Songs, Stories, News/Current Events, Comics, etc...)
2. Make "Learning Volapük" [text]books, and Videos (hint: YouTube)
3. Form a community (a message board/forum, or a IRC, or a Chat-Room, a group on YouTube)

Immediately, we must form a network (as to not let the language die by having someone to talk to). This Topic within this forum was a good start but, we should start PMing each other and creating AIM accounts, to talk to each other.

by the way, Is there a current "Cifal" ?



Reference(s):

[1] http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Volapuk

[2] http://www.villagevoice.com/2000-08-01/art/p-k-memory/1

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Re: Volapük

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-10-10, 2:44

Amikeco wrote::whistle: It can be innocent but who knows, if your teacher knows all connotations. :mrgreen:

By the way, you made a mistake in your list of the weekdays: "Tudel - Wednesday" and the actual word for Wednesday is missing.

Danke schön!
I can't write for crap. :(
Danob oli!
No kanob penön gudiko. :(


So, Arpee, are you going to learn Volapük?
So o Larp, olärnol Volapüki?
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Re: Volapük

Postby arpee » 2008-10-10, 3:04

Si! olärnob Volapük!


Charmap Letters:

    ä - ALT+0228
    ö - ALT+0246
    ü - ALT+0252

    Ä - ALT+0196
    Ö - ALT+0214
    Ü - ALT+0220


Vowels:

    a - father
    ä - met
    e - hey
    i - feel
    o - bold
    ö - worker
    u - food
    ü - Samuel

Consonants who's sounds differs from English:

c - church, judge

j - show

s - zones

g - gum

I can't really hear a difference in "e", and "ä". Someone help me!

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Re: Volapük

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-10-10, 4:12

A quick explanation for your phonetics:

S can be voiced or unvoiced-sad or zone.

The same thing applies to C and J.

E is the "short E" egg. /e/ in IPA and X-SAMPA.
Ä is English's long "a" (I believe is the term). Made. /E/ in X-SAMPA /ε/ in IPA.
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Re: Volapük

Postby Sheidhaf » 2008-10-10, 23:14

Is that really what you call them in Texas? At least where I come from, we call /e/ long a and /ε/ short e (although actually the /e/ is actually /eɪ/).

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Re: Volapük

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-10-10, 23:22

Sheidhaf wrote:Is that really what you call them in Texas? At least where I come from, we call /e/ long a and /ε/ short e (although actually the /e/ is actually /eɪ/).

I couldn't remember. I haven't used this term since I was learning English.
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Re: Volapük

Postby Sheidhaf » 2008-10-11, 2:03

Those are the only terms that I can get anyone in my area to respond to. I don't like to use them, but no one understands me unless I do, so they stay fresh in my mind.

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Re: Volapük

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-10-13, 22:48

Sheidhaf wrote:Those are the only terms that I can get anyone in my area to respond to. I don't like to use them, but no one understands me unless I do, so they stay fresh in my mind.


Yeah, I know how that is.
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Re: Volapük

Postby Narbleh » 2008-10-16, 13:49

How are new words introduced in Volapük?

I've also been looking high and low for samples of Volapük spoken, but haven't found any.
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Re: Volapük

Postby Dawid » 2008-10-16, 14:28

here you are:
http://pl.youtube.com/watch?v=vCCuwtnvV8g
with fragments of beautiful anthem, but I can't find mp3 of it, I've only found lyrics.

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Re: Volapük

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-10-17, 2:46

Narbleh wrote:How are new words introduced in Volapük?


There are three basic ways:
1) Use the dummy particle. This is the most frequently used method.
Internet - el Internet
I love the internet! - Löfilob eli Internet.

The dummy particle is inflected like the noun would be if it was a "native" word.

2) A compound is formed from a description of the item. This is also used relatively often.
Novel - gretabuk (book-of-large)

3) A new word is created. I have never actually seen this done, nor can I provide an example, however I suppose it may have been done some time in the past.
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Re: Volapük

Postby ILuvEire » 2008-11-17, 23:35

Does no one want to learn Volapük any more? :cry:
Vilol-la lärnön Volapüki nu? :cry:
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Re: Volapük

Postby Dawid » 2009-01-02, 14:34

hi guys ;)
I correspond with Mr. Ralph Midgley.
He send me some materials, we're thinking about youth section of volapuk movement, but we don't have members ;)
I also corresponded with Mr. Andre Cherpillod, who sent me books about Volapuk (dictionary, grammar, and history of the language).
If u want to learn Volapuk, simply send me a message ;)
(ILuvEire i sent u a lot of messages, why don't u write back?)

Menefe bal, puk bal!

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Re: Volapük

Postby arpee » 2009-04-13, 2:05

I still want to learn Volapük.

I have a question. How can I write these letters ä, ö, ü on the computer easily. I don't want to have to keep going to the internet to hunt these letters down. :)

Also, are these the correct sounds for the vowels:

A: fAther
Ä: EIGHt
E: mEt
I: machIne
O: pOrt
Ö: workER
U: sOOn
Ü: mUch

Ü is like "shwa"?

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Re: Volapük

Postby ILuvEire » 2009-04-13, 3:06

arpee wrote:I still want to learn Volapük.

I have a question. How can I write these letters ä, ö, ü on the computer easily. I don't want to have to keep going to the internet to hunt these letters down. :)

I'm not exactly sure how to do it. Maybe someone can help me??

Also, are these the correct sounds for the vowels:

A: fAther
Ä: EIGHt
E: mEt
I: machIne
O: pOrt
Ö: workER
U: sOOn
Ü: mUch

Ü is like "shwa"?

Ö and Ü aren't in English. Can you read IPA? Ö is [ø] and Ü is [y]. For Ö put your mouth like you're going to say the vowel in "main" then put your lips like you are saying the vowel in "moon." For Ü put your mouth like you're going to say the vowel in "me" and put your lips like you're going to say the vowel in "moon."

They are hard sounds.
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