Conlingo

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Massimiliano B
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Location: Lucca
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Re: Conlingo

Postby Massimiliano B » 2021-09-07, 13:55

Conlingo (koniigo in Conlingo) is spoken in Italy, in a universe parallel to ours. Here things are identical to our universe, but the languages are different.
English is known as "enigu" in this universe, and "I am, you are, he is", in enigu, is "ka taas, ba tais, ne taus". But this a different story.
Conlingo derives from yaatino (Latin), spoken originally 2500 years ago in Yooma (Rome), the capital of Itaaya (Italy).
Here is a list of some geographical names of European countries (Euyoopa = Europe)
(note that ending -ku derives from yoku "land")
Germany = Kemaaniya
France = Piyanisa
Spain = Sipaniya
Portugal = Aitigalo (aiti = haven)
Greece = Giyeekiya
Austria = Banuya (banu = south)
Switzerland = Suiseku
England = Eniguku
Ireland = Iyeku
Denmark = Daniku
Sweden = Suesiya
Norway = Oitiyeega (oitku = north)
Finland = Piniyaku
Iceland = Atiiku (ati = ice)
Poland = Poyooniya
Russia = Yusiya
Estonia = Esitooniya
Latvia = Yetooniya
Lithuania = Ituaaniya
Czech Republic = Kekiya
Romania = Yomaniya

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Massimiliano B
Posts: 1878
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Location: Lucca
Country: IT Italy (Italia)

Re: Conlingo

Postby Massimiliano B » 2021-09-08, 13:14

Imperfective suffix

-tuu is the imperfective suffix. It can be used with any tense and mood. It is not obligatory, but we can add it when we want to avoid confusion: I can say "I go to school" or "I am going to school" without any difference in Conlingo, but if I want to mean that I am going right now without any risk to be misunderstood, I can add -tuu after the temporal suffixes.

I go to school = Dotiisa (I go) agin (to) duyami (school).
I am going to school = Dotiisatuu agin duyami
I went to school = Dotiisakaa agin duyami
I was going to school = Dotiisakaatuu agin duyami
I will go to school = Dotiisati agin duyami
I will be going to school = Dotiisatituu agin duyami

With question particle -nii:
Are you going to school? = Aotiisatuunii agin duyami?

If I want to say "I go to school every day", I cannot use -tuu. But if I want to say that I am going to school in this moment, I can use -tuu or I can do without it.


With conditional/subjunctive suffix -bze:

I would be going to school (now) = Dotiisatuubze agin duyami

I would be going to school (in the future) = Dotiisatituubze agin duyami

I would have been going to school... (yesterday or in another past moment) = Dotiisakaatuubze agin duyami...

I can use the present tense in order to mean a near future, so if I say "I go to school" the listener may understand that I am going to go to school in the immediate future. But if I say "dotiisatuu agin duyami" the listener understands only that I am going in the moment I am speaking.

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Massimiliano B
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Re: Conlingo

Postby Massimiliano B » 2021-09-08, 18:16

"I like x" in Conlingo is:
To me x is pleasant.
If x = fish, the sentence is
Dab (to me) ganana (fishes.plur.abs.) yukonisa (are) zuutkiyan (pleasant.plur.abs)
I can use it also with verbs:
I like singing = Dab oinuga (singing) yonisa zuutki

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Massimiliano B
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Re: Conlingo

Postby Massimiliano B » 2021-09-10, 2:41

How to say "I am thirsty / hungry":
Du da yenuma ibinaa (in me is thirst).
Du da yenuma timoo (in me is hunger).

Dialogue:
a. Are you hungry? = Du aki yenumanii timoo?
b. Yes, very hungry. = Koo, aiki (very) timoo.
a. What would you want to eat? Would you like some fruits? = Bai daunimokibzenii? Akib konoyan maisu yukonisabzenii zuutki?
b. Yes, I would eat some. = Koo, daimokibze konoyan.

Aiki means "very". It agrees with the noun it refers. If this is plural, it adds the plural ending -yan: aikiyan

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Massimiliano B
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Re: Conlingo

Postby Massimiliano B » 2021-09-10, 23:33

Complex sentences (1)

a. It's good that you’re coming = Ebindunii anaki yonisa yaadu (coming-future your is good)
b. It's good for me = Nai da katu yonisa yaadu (as-for me this is good)
c. It's good for me that you are coming = Nai da ebindunii anaki yonisa yaadu (as-for me coming-future your is good)
d. It's good of you to come = Ebindunii anaki yonisa yaadu (like a.)
e. We know that you came = Dadidumi ebindukaa anaki (We-know coming-past your)
f. We told him that you are good = Yukob dadutayakaa onisa yaadu anaki (To-him we-told being good your)
g. I hope that you will come = Daoidami ebindunii anaki ( I-hope coming-fut. your) [I am not sure about this one]

ebindu = to come
ebindunii = to come.fut
ebindukaa = to come.past
Last edited by Massimiliano B on 2021-09-11, 23:56, edited 1 time in total.

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Massimiliano B
Posts: 1878
Joined: 2009-03-31, 10:01
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Location: Lucca
Country: IT Italy (Italia)

Re: Conlingo

Postby Massimiliano B » 2021-09-11, 23:47

Complex sentences (2)

I want you to go = Daunuga otiisa anaki (I want going your)
I want to go = Dunotiisa (I-want-go)
I think that he's going = Daumiya otiisa anyuko (I think going his)
She says that Mark has gone = Koutaya otiisakaa an Maaiku (She-says having-gone of Mark)
I'm going downtown to buy some fruit = Dotiisa agin naatu an paasi yo azugu anda kono maisub (I-go to centre of city for buying my some fruit-dat.)
I wrote him in order for him to know that = Yukob dinuga yo idumi anaki nuukib (he.dat. I-wrote for knowing his that-dat.)

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Massimiliano B
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Re: Conlingo

Postby Massimiliano B » 2021-09-12, 14:18

Passive (verb+nti)

To form the passive voice, add -nti to the verb. The ergative is not presente in the passive:

She is eating a fish = Yukot koimokituu gana (yuko-t ko-imoki-tuu gana: 3sg.-erg. 3sg.erg.-eat.-imp. fish.abs )

The fish is eaten = Gana yimokinti (gana y-imoki-nti: fish.abs. 3sg.abs.-eat.-pass.)

This sentence implies that the fish is usually eaten in some circumstances by many. For instance I can say:
In this city fish is eaten (usually) = Du Sikiliya gana yimokinti.

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Massimiliano B
Posts: 1878
Joined: 2009-03-31, 10:01
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Location: Lucca
Country: IT Italy (Italia)

Re: Conlingo

Postby Massimiliano B » 2021-09-12, 14:19

Passive (verb+nti)

To form the passive voice, add -nti to the verb. The ergative is not present in the passive:

She is eating a fish = Yukot koimokituu gana (yuko-t ko-imoki-tuu gana: 3sg.-erg. 3sg.erg.-eat.-imp. fish.abs )

The fish is eaten = Gana yimokinti (gana y-imoki-nti: fish.abs. 3sg.abs.-eat.-pass.)

This sentence implies that the fish is usually eaten in some circumstances by many. For instance I can say:
In this city fish is eaten (usually) = Du katu paasi, gana yimokinti.


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