Bulgarian lessons

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Levo
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Postby Levo » 2008-01-07, 19:46

Arcane wrote:Btw I'm surprised Bulgarians look more familiar to your eyes than Romanians. Which places have you visited here?
:)


First, Thank you for the new replies.

Romanians look a bit like gipsies to me :-/ while in Bulgaria most people seemed like any other Central-European people.
I was in Varna, Sofia and the Rila monasteries (awesome!). Whole Bulgaria was better than I expected, and a big mile-stone before Romania.

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Postby Arcane » 2008-01-07, 20:38

Well, I believe it depends on the region. And if you're talking about the behaviour, I must say we really have a long path to go, too. Infrastructure changes easily compared to people's mentality. But the good thing is young people travel a lot and start thinking in another way :)

I haven't been to Romania yet but I've had Romanian colleagues at work and they were all very nice. I can say the same for Hungarians - all Hungarians I met were extremely polite. I regret losing tracks of one of the guys, Roland, who spoke pretty good Bulgarian and even wrote poetry :) Btw in one of the towns in the East, some 100 km from Varna there's an annual contest for reciting Hungarian poetry. I was totally shocked to learn that :shock:

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Postby D39 » 2008-01-08, 8:21

Много ти благодаря, бе, Лево за това характеризиране на нашия народ!
Благодарим Бог, че вие сте по-добри от нас и нямате цигани, ни никакво лошо там!

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Postby Levo » 2008-01-08, 12:54

Arcane wrote:Well, I believe it depends on the region. And if you're talking about the behaviour, I must say we really have a long path to go, too. Infrastructure changes easily compared to people's mentality. But the good thing is young people travel a lot and start thinking in another way :)

I haven't been to Romania yet but I've had Romanian colleagues at work and they were all very nice. I can say the same for Hungarians - all Hungarians I met were extremely polite. I regret losing tracks of one of the guys, Roland, who spoke pretty good Bulgarian and even wrote poetry :) Btw in one of the towns in the East, some 100 km from Varna there's an annual contest for reciting Hungarian poetry. I was totally shocked to learn that :shock:

I didn't talk about the behaviour (before a Romanian would start to think otherhow about that gipsy-sentence), but what you said was useful again. I am shocked too about there is that contest for reciting Hungarian poetry!
Indeed I would have plenty of questions about Bulgaria, but they are not linguistical ones, so I don't contaminate this thread here with them.

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Postby Arcane » 2008-01-12, 1:29

D39 wrote:Много ти благодаря бе, Лево, за това характеризиране на нашия народ!
Благодарим на Бог, че вие сте по-добри от нас и нямате ни цигани, ни нищо лошо там!


The expression is:
- благодаря на някого or
- благодаря + short forms of the subjective pronouns ми/ти/му/ѝ/ни/ви/им

:idea: It's completely understandable to say "нямате цигани, ни нищо лошо", but to sound more native you can use the pattern ни-ни or нито-нито. They're like the English neither-nor. For example:

Нямам нито време, нито желание да чета.
I have neither time, nor will to read.

Тя не обича ни Владислав, ни Петър.
She loves neither Vladislav, nor Peter.

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Postby Arcane » 2008-01-12, 1:38

Levo wrote:Indeed I would have plenty of questions about Bulgaria, but they are not linguistical ones, so I don't contaminate this thread here with them.


Feel free to ask whatever you want, you don't contaminate anything :) This thread is for Bulgarian lessons indeed so if you want and if there are more people interested we could open a new thread for general discussion about Bulgaria. Practical information about customs, food, etiquette, tips for visitors etc., a place for questions of any kind.

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Postby D39 » 2008-01-12, 18:26

Arcane wrote:
D39 wrote:Много ти благодаря бе, Лево, за това характеризиране на нашия народ!
Благодарим на Бог, че вие сте по-добри от нас и нямате ни цигани, ни нищо лошо там!


The expression is:
- благодаря на някого or
- благодаря + short forms of the subjective pronouns ми/ти/му/ѝ/ни/ви/им

:idea: It's completely understandable to say "нямате цигани, ни нищо лошо", but to sound more native you can use the pattern ни-ни or нито-нито. They're like the English neither-nor. For example:

Нямам нито време, нито желание да чета.
I have neither time, nor will to read.

Тя не обича ни Владислав, ни Петър.
She loves neither Vladislav, nor Peter.


Мерси! :) Видя, че говоря на български, но мисля на румънски. :P :D

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Postby Arcane » 2008-01-13, 0:36

Няма защо. Българският ти е на много добро ниво. Курсове ли си посещавал или учиш сам? :)

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Postby gothwolf » 2008-01-13, 11:57

Даам, D39 е един от най-добрите ни ученици тук. И никога не забравя, да ни поздравява за българските празници. :wink:

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Postby ificouldfly » 2008-01-25, 11:01

gothwolf wrote:Даам, D39 е един от най-добрите ни ученици тук. И никога не забравя, да ни поздравява за българските празници. :wink:

А аз даже го помислих за българин :) Браво!
http://thelanguagecorner.blogspot.com/
http://tetradkata.blogspot.com

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Postby gothwolf » 2008-01-25, 21:52

Привет и от мен... :D

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Postby ladyN » 2008-03-26, 11:16

Много добри уроци , gothwolf , браво и благодаря. Аз се занимавам с предподаване на англ. език, но сега съм започнала и обратното и твоите уроци ми помогнаха много. :D

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Postby mithridates » 2008-03-27, 2:09

Levo wrote:
Arcane wrote:
I am thinking hardly on starting Bulgarian. This is my last hope of studying any Slavic language.


What's the reason you feel discouraged to learn a Slavic language? If you're considering Bulgarian, my blind guess is the cases.
If you decide to study we're here to help :waytogo: Knowing Bulgarian you'll be able to understand Macedonian as well. It is based on the Western dialects of Bulgarian.

This is the Bulgarian point of view and the claims of the other countries involved


Your guess is right :) Though I still don't know if it is a less complicated language than for example Croatian just because there are no cases. Any comments?
I read both links. Interesting. There were some interesting refers in it, are you able to understand Serbian too just of Bulgarian?


Interesting, I'm studying Bulgarian for much the same reason as you. I don't think a language like Russian would be too difficult but I'm not interested enough in Russia to make it worth my while. I spent the last year learning Turkish though and Bulgarian has some minor similarities, along with having the lack of noun cases, having the history of Old Church Slavonic and being a member of the EU just makes it that much cooler in my book. Later on when my Bulgarian is good then I'll be able to pick up Russian that much easier, which is about all the effort I'm willing to put in towards a languge of a country that I have no plans to visit.

Bulgaria, though, I would love to visit. I'm planning something next year involving Bulgaria, Turkey and Iran.

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Postby Arcane » 2008-03-29, 13:23

mithridates wrote:Bulgaria, though, I would love to visit. I'm planning something next year involving Bulgaria, Turkey and Iran.


Such a trip would be fantastic indeed. My list is Iran, Iraq, North and South Korea, Bhutan.

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Postby mithridates » 2008-03-29, 16:54

Arcane wrote:
mithridates wrote:Bulgaria, though, I would love to visit. I'm planning something next year involving Bulgaria, Turkey and Iran.


Such a trip would be fantastic indeed. My list is Iran, Iraq, North and South Korea, Bhutan.


Actually I suspect a better place to visit than North Korea if you want to talk to North Koreans would be the cities of Dandong and Tumen in China, which are right across the river. I spent two weeks in Dandong and there are a lot of North Koreans that work there, and I've talked to a lot of them. I've never actually been in the North but apparently the tours are very guided and expensive so some have said it's not worth the money and effort.

It all depends on what you're looking to get out of it though, of course. It might be worth it.

Another place close to the North is the island called Baengnyeong-do (백령도) which is located three hours by ship from Incheon but right next to North Korea, so close that a lot of maps mistakenly colour it in as the North. I spent six days there and it's quite nice. There are no North Koreans but half of the families have relatives there because they used to just take the ship across the strait to Hwanghaedo (the province in N. Korea) and just happened to be unfortunate enough that the marine border was set up between them and the rest of their families. There are some 6000 people on the island and there are some nice rock beaches with really round stones that provide a kind of shiatsu (jiap) effect. The coast on the west side of the island looks really cool too:

Image

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Postby Arcane » 2008-03-31, 19:01

You're making me want to go to Korea so bad! That's something I'll definitely do. Sometimes it's better to invest in experiences like that. Till now I've read all about the bureaucratic stuff needed in order to enter North Korea but the alternatives you give are pretty curious! And the picture is gorgeous, too :)

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Postby Avaldi » 2008-04-06, 15:28

Poor Macedonians: Bulgarians call their language "a bastard language from Bulgarian", Greeks block them and Albanians fight with them :lol:
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Postby Arcane » 2008-04-06, 20:24

Macedonia is a very interesting case. For all the things you mentioned there's a reason. Actually that's the price you pay when you want to join the party of nations some 150 years later than everybody else in your region. And the strangest thing is this happened under a socialistic regime.

To be honest I'm for the idea of a modern Balkan Federation but nationalism in the area is too strong to allow that. Otherwise the political map will be always changing.

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Postby Lietmotiv » 2008-06-30, 13:03


Romanians look a bit like gipsies to me :-/ while in Bulgaria most people seemed like any other Central-European people.
I was in Varna, Sofia and the Rila monasteries (awesome!). Whole Bulgaria was better than I expected, and a big mile-stone before Romania.

Levo,I think you suffer from Romanianphobia,tipically for most of the Hungarians. Romanians are Europeans(a mix of Geto-Dacian+Slavic+Latin). I was blond when I was young,now I'm light brown and blue-eyed. I think your statement is rather malevolent. Indeed,in Romania there is a large gypsy minority,but this doesn't make us gypsies. I take your statement as an offence; There are a lot of gypsies in Hungary ,but this doesn't make you gypsies. So please,reconsider your statement. Honestly,do I look like a gypsy(and most of the Romanians look like me)
Image

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Postby D39 » 2008-06-30, 14:25

Arcane wrote:Няма защо. Българският ти е на много добро ниво. Курсове ли си посещавал или учиш сам? :)


Ми.. сам научил вкъщи. Мислия, че имам връзки с България, `щото един от моите пра-пра-дяди бе българин или така мислим. Той живееше в Добруджа, преди Първата Балканска Война (1913), когато тя бе под българско владство. Също, своето име е българско, Иванчо. И съпругата му бе Калина. Така че аз мисля, че те бяха българи.

gothwolf wrote:Даам, D39 е един от най-добрите ни ученици тук. И никога не забравя, да ни поздравява за българските празници.


Ееее... Мерси, бре! Всеки път, с удоволствие.

ificouldfly wrote:А аз даже го помислих за българин Браво!


Хехехехехе!
Мерси мерси мерси! :oops: :oops: :oops:
Ми... така ли да е? :lol:


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