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Ukrainian/Russian phrases

Posted: 2006-03-26, 13:43
by Luís
I've got some Ukrainian neighbors now, so I thought it would be nice if I learned some sentences to use with them :D
The thing is, I don't know if they speak Ukrainian or Russian as their main language, so if it's possible could you please translate the following sentences into both Ukrainian and Russian? Thanks a lot! :)

Hello/Hi!
How are you?
I am fine, thanks.
Everything's alright.
What about you?
Everything's fine with me too.
Good morning/afternoon/evening/night!
See you later!
Goodbye/Bye!
What is your name?
My name is...
How old are you?
I'm ... years old.
Where in Ukraine are you from?
I'm from ...
How long have you been living here?
I've been living here for ... years.
Do you speak Ukrainian/Russian/Portuguese?
Sorry, I don't speak Ukrainian/Russian.
Thank you/Thanks!
You're welcome.
Welcome.

Posted: 2006-03-26, 14:16
by Paul K.
I assume that you know how I assume that you know how to read Cyr, and, in particular, how to read Ua and Ru.

En —— Ua —— Ru

Hello/Hi! —— Привіт! —— Привет!
How are you? —— Як справи? —— Как дела?
I am fine, thanks. —— Нормально, дякую. —— Нормально, спасибо.
Everything's alright. —— Все гаразд/нормально —— Всё в порядке/нормально.
What about you? —— А ти як?/А в тебе? —— А ты как?/А у тебя?
Everything's fine with me too. —— У мене теж все нормально. —— У меня тоже всё нормально.
Good morning/afternoon/evening/night! —— Доброго ранку/дня/вечору! —— Добр·ое утро/·ый день/·ый вечер!
See you later! —— До зустрічі! —— До встречи!
Goodbye/Bye! —— Бувай! —— Пока!
What is your name? —— Як тебе звуть? —— Как тебя зовут?
My name is... —— Мене звуть … —— Меня зовут …
How old are you? —— Скільки тобі/Вам років? —— Сколько тебе/Вам лет?
I'm ... years old. —— Мені … років. —— Мне … лет.
Where in Ukraine are you from? ——
I'm from ... Я з … —— Я из …
How long have you been living here? —— Скільки ти вже тут живешь? —— Сколько ты тут уже живёшь?
I've been living here for ... years. —— Вже … років. —— Уже … лет.
Do you speak Ukrainian/Russian/Portuguese? —— Ви розмовляєте українською/російською/португальською? —— Вы говорите на украинском/русском/португальском?
Sorry, I don't speak Ukrainian/Russian. —— Вибачте, я не знаю української/російської —— Извините, я не говорю по-украински/по-русски.
Thank you/Thanks! —— Дякую! —— Спасибо!
You're welcome. —— Прошу / будь ласка. —— Пожалуйста.
Welcome. {like inviting someone? if so, then} Ласкаво прошу/просимо. / Добро пожаловать.

Note please, that several English sentences may have more than 1 Ua/Ru variant. I've listed the most standard ones, I hope.

Posted: 2006-03-26, 16:17
by Luís
Thanks a lot! :)

Paul K. wrote:I assume that you know how to read Cyr, and, in particular, how to read Ua and Ru.


Yes, I can read the Cyrillic alphabet and I also know the basics of Russian spelling. As for Ukrainian, I know less...
I believe that when comparing it to Russian spelling, the main differences are that і stands for Russian и, while и is more like the Polish y. Also, г is more of an h sound and е stands for [e] instead of [je]...
Any other major differences I should be aware of?

Paul K. wrote:Where in Ukraine are you from? ——


I believe you forgot to translate this one.

Posted: 2006-03-26, 17:23
by Paul K.
Luis wrote:Yes, I can read the Cyrillic alphabet and I also know the basics of Russian spelling. As for Ukrainian, I know less...Any other major differences I should be aware of?
Actually, everything's right; I'll just sum everything up in the short table:

cyr letter ::: read in UA as ::: read in RU as
    е               [e]                    [je]
    и               [y]                    [i]
    ы                -                     [y]
    є               [je]                    -
    і               [i]                     -
    ї               [ji]                    -
    г               [h]                    [g]
    ґ               [g]                     -

[y] is kind of like in Polish.
Ukrainian doesn't have the reduction like it is in Russian, i.e. no [o]->[a], [e]->[i].
Щ in Ukrainian is pronounced rather like Polish «szcz», not like Russian long soft "sh".

Well, that's in very small nutshell.

Luis wrote:
Where in Ukraine are you from? ——
I believe you forgot to translate this one.
Yes, I forgot.

Actually it can't be translated literally. It'll rather be like this:

Q. Ти/Ви звідки?            (UA)
A. З України.
Q. А з якого міста?      
A. З Полтави.

Q. Ты/Вы откуда?            (RU)
A. Из Украины.
Q. А из какого города?   
A. Из Полтавы.

Posted: 2006-03-26, 21:28
by darkina
Paul K. wrote:cyr letter ::: read in UA as ::: read in RU as
    е               [e]                    [je]
    и               [y]                    [i]
    ы                -                     [y]
    є               [je]                    -
    і               [i]                     -
    ї               [ji]                    -
    г               [h]                    [g]
    ґ               [g]                     -

[y] is kind of like in Polish.
Ukrainian doesn't have the reduction like it is in Russian, i.e. no [o]->[a], [e]->[i].
Щ in Ukrainian is pronounced rather like Polish «szcz», not like Russian long soft "sh".


So Ukrainian и sounds like Russian ы?
And what does this
ї = [ji]

really mean? What do you mean by [ji]?

Posted: 2006-03-26, 21:44
by Paul K.
Darky,

1. Yes, Ukrainian 'И' ~ Russian 'Ы'. I write ~ instead of = because there is the difference; but it's not that really important if it comes only to knowing a list of frequently used phrases.

2. Well, [ji]... It's the combination of the sound [j] (like in "day") and [i] (like in "deep").
So, a phrase like «Чи не бажаєте ще смачної кави?»
would sound like (in PL transcription) «Czy ne bażájete szczé smacznóji káwy?»
meaning «Would you like some more of the tasty coffee?»

Posted: 2006-03-26, 22:10
by Luís
I'll take the opportunity to ask about the linguistical situation in Ukraine too ;)

As far as I know, even if Ukrainian is the sole official language, Russian is very widespread, especially in cities. Ukrainian is more widely spoken in the west, where you have regions where virtually everyone speaks Ukrainian as a primary language, while in the East and Crimea it's the opposite and you have regions where virtually everyone uses Russian only. Kiev seems to be rather bilingual, but more on the Russian side. And then apparently there's a large percentage of people that, even if they think they're speaking either Russian or Ukrainian, speak in fact a mix of the two, the so called Surzhyk.

Now, this is what comes in books. How are things in reality?

I've always wondered if the Ukrainians around here speak mostly Ukrainian or Russian, as I can't really distinguish the two languages when I hear them, only when they're written down...(any tips? they seem to use more or less the same phonemes...)
I know that in the last presidental elections, the results in Portugal (for those Ukrainians who voted at the embassy and consulates here) were 95% for Ющенко. Since the West of Ukraine also voted massively for him, while the East didn't, maybe I can assume most Ukrainians here are from the West and therefore speak Ukrainian as their primary language? :P

Posted: 2006-03-26, 22:16
by darkina
Ahem, Luis... I made a separate topic about it just minutes before you came up with this...;) I figured it'd be more neatly organised if it was in a topic of its own.

Posted: 2006-03-26, 22:18
by darkina
Paul K. wrote:2. Well, [ji]... It's the combination of the sound [j] (like in "day") and [i] (like in "deep").
So, a phrase like «Чи не бажаєте ще смачної кави?»
would sound like (in PL transcription) «Czy ne bażájete szczé smacznóji káwy?»
meaning «Would you like some more of the tasty coffee?»


Ok... I know that there's a difference between the two sounds but I can't always hear it and most of all I can't really produce it myself... :oops:

Posted: 2006-03-26, 22:21
by Luís
Darky wrote:Ahem, Luis... I made a separate topic about it just minutes before you came up with this...;) I figured it'd be more neatly organised if it was in a topic of its own.


:oops: :oops:

Sorry about that, I guess I overlooked it...
They say it's a good thing when two people think about the same thing at the same time, right? :P

Re:

Posted: 2016-02-24, 15:06
by aaakknu
Paul K. wrote:
I am fine, thanks. —— Нормально, дякую. —— Нормально, спасибо.
Everything's alright. —— Все гаразд/нормально —— Всё в порядке/нормально.


Не варто зловживати словом "нормально". Краще використати "непогано/добре" або "чудово".

Paul K. wrote:How long have you been living here? —— Скільки ти вже тут живешь? —— Сколько ты тут уже живёшь?
I've been living here for ... years. —— Вже … років. —— Уже … лет.


"живеш" пишеться без "ь", як і всі інші дієслова другої особи однини.