Vietnamese Lessons - Bài học tiếng Việt

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JackFrost
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Vietnamese Lessons - Bài h

Postby JackFrost » 2005-04-23, 21:39

This is where I will be teaching the lessons with the help of my boyfriend, who is a native Vietnamese speaker. All questions must be placed in Discussion thread, not in here.


First lesson will be coming shortly, right now I need to prepare one. ;)
Neferuj paħujkij!

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Postby JackFrost » 2005-04-28, 2:51

Bài Học Một - Lesson One

Xin chào! Các người khỏe không? Bở nay tôi đang viêt hệ thống chữ cái và giọng.
Click here to hear the sound clip version.
Hello! How are you all? Today I am going to do the alphabet and tones. :P

Hệ Thống Chữ Cái - Alphabet

It is 29 letters in the alphabet.
a ă â b c d đ e ê g h i k l m n o ô ơ p q r s t u ư v x y

Only eight consonants can be finals:
c ch m n ng nh p t

Nguyên Âm - Vowels

a - as in father
ă - as English a, but using your tongue
â - as in e
ai - as in buy
ao - as in now
au - as in a-oo
âu - as in go
ay - as aye
ây - as in hey
e - as in Claire
ê - as in caf
i - as in see
ia - as ee-a
ie - as in yes
o - as in door
oa - as in moi
oă - as in lack
oai - as in why
oay - as in Uruguay
oe - as in where
oi - as in choice
ô - as in Bordeaux
ôi - as in toy
ơ - as in teacher, or French œ
ơi - as in French œil
u - as in zoo
ư - as in French euh
ua - as in Ecuador
ưo - as in French ou
uê - as in question
ui - as in oui
uôi - as way-ee
ươ - as in French queue
uy - as oui
uya - as in French culture
uyen - as oui-en
uyu - as in new
y - as in see
ye - as in yen
yeu - as in yew

Phụ Âm - Consonants

d - as in yes
đ - as English d
gh - as in go
gi - as z
kh - as k
nh - as in French gn
ng, ngh - as English ng
ph - as English f
tr - as in try

All consonants not listed here are pronounced as they would be in standard English.

Note: q is not pronounced at all, except when followed by u. And also, the final letters may not be pronounced.

Giọng - Tones

Vietnamese contains six tones.

1) Không Dấu - Netural - a (no marking)
2) Dấu Sắc - High-Rising - á
3) Dấu Huyền - Low-Falling - à
4) Dấu Hỏi - Low-Rising - ả
5) Dấu Ngã - High-Broken - ã
6) Dấu Nặng - Low-Broken - ạ

You can hear them here.

Tones are part of Vietnamese. Changing the tone of a word will change its meaning...

Examples using ma:

ma - ghost
má - cheek
mà - but
mả - tomb
mã - horse
mạ - rice seedling

Examples using ca:

ca - sing
cá - fish
cà - tomato
cả - whole/all/big
cạ - stroke
Neferuj paħujkij!

Barret VII

Postby Barret VII » 2005-05-02, 0:24

I can't see the special Vietnamese characters :?

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Postby JackFrost » 2005-05-02, 0:30

Please! Questions and Comments go to the Discussion topic!!! ;)

I answered you there.
Neferuj paħujkij!

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Postby Fabiano » 2005-06-04, 18:59

Jack, your avatar is wonderful.

Why have you stopped this course?

Why does Vietnamese have so many vowels? How can a human being learn to pronouce so many sounds?

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Postby JackFrost » 2005-06-04, 20:33

Erm...questions go to discussion topic. :P

I replied you there. ;)
Neferuj paħujkij!

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Postby JackFrost » 2005-06-09, 2:21

Bài Học Hai - Lesson Two


Kính Chào Qúy Vì - Greetings

Xin chào/Chào - Both mean: Hello/Hi/Goodbye/Bye
Kính chào qúy vì - Hello everyone
Xin chào các vì - Hello
Lán tới gạp lại/Sẻ gạp lại - See you

Anh/Em khỏe không? - How are you? (Anh for males and the olders, em for females and the youngers)

Anh/Em khoẻ lám - I'm very good
Anh/Em khoẻ - I'm good/I'm ok
Củng được - Quite so so
Anh/Em không khoẻ - I'm bad/I'm not good
Anh/Em không được khoẻ - Same as above

You can leave out the anh/em and just say the adjectives.

Đại từ - Pronouns

Discussing personal pronouns is quite a pain and it is probably the most confusing feature of Vietnamese for foreigners, even to some native Vietnamese speakers themselves. Because, Vietnamese pronouns can go beyond the meaning of simple "I", "you", and so forth. It can depend on the gender, conversation context, and relation. So, I'll give you a basic translations, and then provide a link to a page that will further discuss the pronouns.

I/me - Tôi
You (familar male) - Anh
You (familar female) - Chị
You (formal male) - Ông
You (formal female) - Bà

He/him - Anh ta (formal: Ông ta)
She/her - Chị ta (formal: Bà ta)
It - Nó

We/us - Chúng tôi
You (familar) - Các anh
You (formal) - Các ông
They/them - Họ

Here is the link for further depth of Vietnamese pronouns.

Động từ - Verbs

Vietnamese verbs are really simple, and they do not change at all for persons and tenses. The construction is exactly like English.

To eat - ăn, fish - cá

Tôi ăn cá - I eat fish.
Anh ăn cá - You eat fish.
Chúng tôi ăn cá. - We eat fish.

To love - yêu

Anh yêu em. - I love you. (Older person to younger person)
Em yêu anh. - I love you. (Younger person to older person)

There is no "to" infinitive in Vietnamese.

I love to eat fish. - Tôi yêu ăn cá.

To Be

Although Vietnamese has a verb same as English "to be", là, but it does not work exactly like the English way. It is only used when a noun is involved with a sentence like "I am a student". With adjectives, it is dropped altogether - a Vietnamese speaker would say "I hungry" instead of "I'm hungry".

Tôi là sinh viên. - I am a student.
Tôi đói. - I am hungry.

Tenses

Tenses are expressed by using "today", "yesterday", "tomorrow", and such. But however, Vietnamese does have a word classifier expressing the past, đã. And the future tense, sẽ. Like English, they are placed before the verb.

I have eaten fish. - Tôi đã ăn cá.
I will eat fish. - Tôi sẽ ăn cá.
Last edited by JackFrost on 2005-09-12, 6:12, edited 1 time in total.
Neferuj paħujkij!

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Postby JackFrost » 2005-06-19, 0:53

There is a Wiki entry for Vietnamese alphabet.

http://home.unilang.org/main/wiki2/inde ... e_alphabet

Enjoy!
Neferuj paħujkij!

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Postby JackFrost » 2005-09-12, 6:01

I'll be posting my next lesson by the end of this week.

In the meanwhile, for your entertainment! Vietnamese cuisine! :mrgreen:

I just cooked up myself one! Observe the photo...

Image

Now the middle, the bowl: that is phở gà - chicken () rice noodle soup (phở). It's made of chicken broth (I added a little water to make it less intense), rice noodles, chicken, a clove of garlic, hint of chili sauce, and fish sauce. You can squeeze a slice of lime into the soup, add bean sprouts, and herbs like parsley and basil. It's very healthy choice for some. :)

Now, for the pan...it's just warm water in order to soften the bánh tráng (rice paper) as shown over the pan. You put a sheet in the water, and it will get soft and a little sticky. Then you put the soft sheet on an emtpy plate (shown at the left side of the soup). You can put stuffs from the plate over the soup, which consists of herbs (basil and parsley), chicken, and pea pods. Then you add a chunk of noodles (as shown northwest of the soup) with the stuffs, and you roll it into like a roll like this:

http://www.seasite.niu.edu/vietnamese/v ... grolls.jpg

Just exactly like the way you make fatijas! ;)

The roll is called bánh cuốn (spring rolls). There are two types of spring rolls, bánh cuốn and gỏi cuốn. The difference is that gỏi cuốn has shrimps in it, not meat. You can dip both kinds of spring rolls into fish sauce called nước mắm (as shown in wine glass - I didn't have very small bowls, so I used that glass instead). Nước mắm is made from fish soaked in salt water for certain amount of time before taken out. I know it doesn't sound pleasant to eat a sauce made from "rotten" fish, but it's good! :P

And final thing, is the black sauce next to the foot of wine glass with nước mắm, is called nước tương Hoisin. You can dip your chicken or vegatable from the soup into that sauce to enchance the flavor. Oh, the red dots are just chili sauce drops to make the black sauce a little spicy. :)

Oh, that glass of drink is just orange juice. :P

Yep, that's a pretty typical Vietnamese dinner. 8)

Remember, discussions and comments go to the Discussion topic in the Vietnamese forum. ;)
Neferuj paħujkij!

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Postby Cathurian » 2005-09-16, 23:58

Awesome! :)

I'm not learning Vietnamese, but that seems like a mighty tasty dinner! Thanks for posting this; very informative.

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Postby JackFrost » 2005-09-21, 3:07

Bài Học Ba - Lesson Three

Tính Từ - Adjectives

Unlike English, Vietnamese adjectives always follow after the noun.

Cây - Tree
Cá - Fish

To - Big
Nhở - Small

Cây to - Big tree
Cá nhở - Small fish

Mệnh lệnh - Commands

Commands are simply made by putting a marker, that means adding đi (go) after the verbs.

Đi đi! - Go (away)!
Làm đi! - Do it!
Ăn đi! - Eat!

If the command implies a negative meaning, then you must add đừng (don't do) before the verbs.

Đừng đi! - Don't go!
Đừng làm ồn! - Don't be noisy!

Làm sao nói "không" - How to say "not"

The word "not" would be translated as "không", and it is placed before the verbs or adjectives.

Tôi không đi học ở trường. - I am not going to school.
Tôi không thương em. - I do not like you.

Thuộc Địa - Possessions

To expess possession in Vietnamese is very simple, simply add của after the noun and then place the pronouns explained in Lesson Two.

Mẹ của tôi - My mother
Nhà của em - Your house
Tôi đã tìm tiền của cô ta. - I found her money.


And that's all I could think of for now, except how to form questions. But I'm not sure about how to do it, so I have to ask Matt tomorrow.
Neferuj paħujkij!

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Postby nettchelobek1 » 2006-06-05, 23:17

it seems that this thread is already dead...(despite my post.. :roll: )
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I'm a vietnamese

Postby sevencoloriris » 2006-06-20, 2:59

I can't read the special sign even I'm Vietnamese. doesn't this sever support font unicode?

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Postby Senyani » 2006-12-12, 14:37

Yes.
Se inelos tarvi keuma se ilé doma kavu.

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Nukalurk
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Postby Nukalurk » 2006-12-12, 15:53

The IE browser has problems with Unicode.

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Postby Senyani » 2006-12-13, 12:17

That's exactly why I ditched IE and got Fire Fox. Oh yeah and I have a bunch of Unicode fonts too! So that helps. I collect different fonts btw.
Se inelos tarvi keuma se ilé doma kavu.



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Postby Tomii515 » 2007-08-02, 21:13

Why did you stop the lessons?
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