Persian Study Group

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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby eskandar » 2019-06-21, 20:15

vijayjohn wrote:My attempt at a translation:

You said, "I've come tonight to tell you that I have to go."
You said, "I want to tell you: These days, I am a traveler."
"I have to go" was only an empty phrase for you.
If only you had seen: My heart had fallen underneath your feet!
Perhaps it wasn't your sin; perhaps it was my fault.
Perhaps this is the consequence of falling in love like this. :?:

Travel is always a story of leaving and loneliness. :?:
Don't tell me that separation is also a destiny in part of life!
One person always leaves, and the other becomes alone goes and leaves someone alone (آدم و = آدم را)
He leaves; he leaves a world of memories behind him.
An unfamiliar heart always remains in [implied] a lonely corner.
One person (is) a traveler, and the other remains on this side of the world.

I can't work up the nerve to say, "Don't forget my heart!" "Stay, for the sake of my heart!"
But without you leaving, know that with your leaving, life leaves my tired body. (بدون = بدان from دانستن)
Stay for an alley that is awash in tears without you!
A wet cloud from its sky is the clouds of my eyes. :?:

Stay for a home that needs the fragrance of your body!
Stay for a window that loves...seeing you!
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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby vijayjohn » 2019-06-24, 22:42

Thanks! Next is a song called "Dara Ba Dara," sung by the classic Afghan singer Nashenas (I've decided to give up on guessing which sentences I probably got wrong :P):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOlvJ2jVuWM
Lyrics:

دره به دره هوای پغمان به دره
دستمال نگار شوم که بادم ببره
بادم ببره به سوی یارم ببره
سر در بغلش مانده و خوابم ببره

قبای چید ز بلبل داره یار جان
دوازده بند کاکل داره یار جان
دوازده بند کاکل غنچهء گل
هوای شهر کابل داره یار جان

در این دشت کلان غوغا کنم من
ترا از بوی گل پیدا کنم من
تو خو از بوی گل پیدا نمیشی
جوانی را به غم سودا کنم من

به سر داری نگار دستمال جالی
مه زحمت میکشم در کرد شالی
دلم میشه که پیش تو بیایم
خجالت میکشم از دست خالی

My attempt at a translation:

(I go from) valley to valley (and am) fond of Paghman in the valley.
May I become my sweetheart's handkerchief that carries my pride!
May it carry my pride; may it carry it towards my lover!
With my head next to her, may it carry my sleep!

The dearly beloved one has a cloak cut from a nightingale.
The dearly beloved one has twelve clamps of hair.
The twelve clamps of hair are flower buds.
The dearly beloved one is fond of the city of Kabul.

I cry out in this large plain.
I find you from the fragrance of a flower.
You aren't found (with your) disposition from the fragrance of a flower.
Let me trade youth for sorrow!

You want a resplendent handkerchief, darling.
I work hard in cultivating rice in the paddy field.
I am in love so that I come before you.
I feel ashamed of being empty-handed.

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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby eskandar » 2019-06-25, 19:11

vijayjohn wrote:My attempt at a translation:

(I go from) valley to valley (and am) fond of Paghman in the valley. I think it's more like "from valley to valley, the atmosphere of Paghman is [everywhere] in the valley". But I'm not totally sure about the best way to translate this.
May I become my sweetheart's handkerchief that carries my pride! the wind may carry me away!
May it carry my pride me; may it carry it me towards my lover!
With my head next to her, may it carry my sleep! I fall asleep! (خوابِ کسی بردن = to fall asleep)

The dearly beloved one has a cloak cut from a nightingale.
The dearly beloved one has twelve clamps of hair.
The twelve clamps of hair are flower buds.
The dearly beloved one is fond of the city of Kabul. ٍI think this is similar to meaning of هوا in the first line, "has the air of Kabul" (in the sense of the French "a l'air de Kabul"). But again, it's ambiguous.

May I cry out in this large plain.
May I find you from the fragrance of a flower.
You aren't found (with your) disposition from the fragrance of a flower.
Let me trade youth for sorrow!

You want have a resplendent handkerchief [wrapped] on your head, darling.
I work hard in cultivating rice in the paddy field.
I am in love so that I want to come before you. I've never heard it before, but I take دلم میشه to be an Afghan equivalent of دلم میخواهد
I feel ashamed of being empty-handed.
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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby Persianteacher » 2019-07-21, 11:20

Hey..nice active group. :)

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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby vijayjohn » 2019-07-22, 8:44

Thanks! :)
eskandar wrote:You want have a resplendent handkerchief [wrapped] on your head, darling.

The به سر داری part confused me because of "Mara Mibini O Har Dam" (نمی‌دانم چه سر داری). I didn't realize he literally meant she had the handkerchief on her head! :lol:

Anyway, the Iranian song I'm getting new words from this time is "Pishdaramad" by Ali Azimi:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DUi9uYUeX9I
Lyrics and a few translations into English: https://lyricstranslate.com/en/pishdara ... logue.html

And the non-Iranian one is "Rahguzar," a Tajik song by Nigina Amonqulova:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QG1qt3W7nLQ
Lyrics and translations into English and Russian: https://lyricstranslate.com/en/rahguzar ... guzar.html

Vocabulary:
همین - this/these (same, very)
تقصیر - fault
عاقبت - consequence
این جوری - like this
دلتنگی - loneliness, gloom, depression, homesickness
قسمت - part, portion (in addition to 'destiny'; remember this from the note on نصیب here!)
خاطره - memory
جا گذاشتن - to leave (behind)
گوشه - corner
خاطر - sake, behalf, account, mind, heart (in addition to 'memory')
لبریز - awash
محتاج - needy, needing (honestly, this should have been obvious because I know that root from Swahili (kuhitaji 'to need'), but my brain keeps confusing it with مفتاح in Arabic somehow :lol:)
دستمال - handkerchief
بادم ببرد - that the wind carries me (away - or 'that my wind carries'? Obviously subjunctive)
خوابِ کسی بردن - to fall asleep
چید (in قبای چید ز بلبل داره یار جان) = چیده‎?
بند - clamp? (among other meanings)
خو - disposition (in addition to character)
سودا - trade
جلی, جالی - clear, resplendent; large, distinct, and plain
کرد, کردو - sown plot with raised bank
شالی - rice paddy
برق - electricity, lightning, flash
طلسم - spell, talisman(!)
حل شدن - to be solved
زانو - knee (like genou!)
خم شدن - to bend
کَل - bald head
فقر - poverty
گله - flock, herd
ذهن - mind
دمت گرم - bravo!
استرس - stress
مقبول شدن - to be accepted
وصله ناجور - misfit
گونه - cheek (in addition to 'color', etc.)
ریه - lung
خام - raw, idle, vain
داد زدن - to shout
دلیل - reason, proof, argument
حیف - alas, (what a) pity, shame
به فاک زدن - to fuck up? (English loanword?)
رهگذر - passerby, wayfarer
آرمان - desire
ساعتی چرخ - life? (соате чарх in Tajik)
خویش - relative
پیک - messenger
نجات - rescue, deliverance, escape, salvation
دلربا - charming
اجل - death
تقدیر - destiny, fate
عسکر - army (as well as soldier), pl. عساکر
زنجیر - chain
فرزند - child, offspring
پرست - worshiper, worshiping, pl. پرستان
مذکور - aforementioned
جبین - forehead
مسرت - joy
شکفتن - to blossom
عطا کردن - to give, grant, bestow, confer
فاضل - knowledgeable, learned (man), scholar
ماهیت - characteristic, nature
همو - (apparently a variant of همان?)
مخالف - opposed
اتم - (apparently, nuclear weapons are just called "atom" in Afghanistan now :hmm:)
فرارفتن - to go on, proceed
توان - power
محدود - limited
نگرانی - anxiety, worry, fear
سطح - level (can mean a few other similar things as well)
نشیب - decline, descent
شیپور - horn, bugle
دراز - long
گنده - large
عزا - mourning, condolence
منتها - except that, the difference is (plus a few other meanings)
عزاداری - mourning, lamentation; mournfulness
مرثیه - elegy
این برنامها - stuff like that?
سنتی - traditional
حلقه - circle (of people), ring
خوش برخورد - likeable
محیط - environment
مجهز - furnished, equipped
چشم انداز - view, outlook, vision
اتصال - connection
خط سیر - itinerary, route, destination?
فعلی - current, present
مسیر - route, path
بین المللی - international
داخلی - domestic, internal
قرار گرفته - located
مزاحم شدن - to bother, trouble
پول نقد - cash
به امید دیدار - goodbye
مکالمه - conversation, dialogue
ستون‎ - column
مقبره - tomb
صادر کردن - to issue
قطار - train (as well as line)
ایستادن - to stop

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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby eskandar » 2019-07-25, 16:54

vijayjohn wrote:بادم ببرد - that the wind carries me (away - or 'that my wind carries'? Obviously subjunctive) yes, though of course the first reading is more likely!
چید (in قبای چید ز بلبل داره یار جان) = چیده‎? not sure what your question is here
زانو - knee (like genou!) yes, or English "genuflect" !
به فاک زدن - to fuck up? (English loanword?) yes and yes. For something to get/become fucked up the verb به فاک رفتن can be used, among others.
ساعتی چرخ - life? (соате чарх in Tajik) dunno - never encountered this, but I'm not very familiar with Tajik. چرخ often refers to fate/fortune (as in چرخ فلک) so that could make sense...
خویش - relative what was the context? I've never seen it used that way - usually it's a synonym for خود
همو - (apparently a variant of همان?) what's the context for this one as well? In Tehrani Persian [hamo] would be هم را but in the right setting I could imagine it being همان = همون = همو [hamu]
به امید دیدار - goodbye meaning "hope to see you", it's often used in anticipation of a visit rather than at the end, ie. "looking forward to seeing you!"
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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby vijayjohn » 2019-08-02, 7:36

eskandar wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:چید (in قبای چید ز بلبل داره یار جان) = چیده‎? not sure what your question is here

Can چید be a participle rather than a finite verb? (What about other past-tense forms, e.g. کرد? And do they have to be in third person?).
ساعتی چرخ - life? (соате чарх in Tajik) dunno - never encountered this, but I'm not very familiar with Tajik. چرخ often refers to fate/fortune (as in چرخ فلک) so that could make sense...
خویش - relative what was the context? I've never seen it used that way - usually it's a synonym for خود

Oh OK, being a synonym for خود would make more sense. I was just confused as to what it meant. This is from the end of the first stanza in "Rahguzar":

لبهای مرا به ساعتی چرخ
بر ساقر خویش بسته بگذر
همو - (apparently a variant of همان?) what's the context for this one as well? In Tehrani Persian [hamo] would be هم را but in the right setting I could imagine it being همان = همون = همو [hamu]

No particular context, I suspect this is just a word that Afghans use a lot for some reason. I started noticing it in LangMedia, specifically in this dialogue (dialogue #3 here if you want to hear the original audio). Sometimes, I think they may even say امو instead:

به جای ازی که بره و شاگرد صبوری شوه و دوباره خواندن های ازو ره به همو سبک ازو تکرار کنه، وقتی که می بینه یک گروه کوچک در پاکستان چقدر توانست تاثیر بگذاره، چقدر ماهیت همو سیاست روزی تبدیل کرد در همو زمان خود 'instead of going and becoming a student of Saboori (an Afghan singer) and repeating his songs in his style, when he sees that one small group could be so effective in Pakistan and it changed the nature of the politics of the day in its time'

نه تنها تقلیدی و تکراری بلکه در همو یک سطحی که همیشه می رفته 'not only imitative and repetitive but also on the same level as always'

مه خوش ندارم اولش، که یک نفر بره پیش هنگامه، امو سبک هنگامه ره یاد بگیره 'I don't like people to go to Hangama (a female Afghan singer), learn Hangama's style.'

همو سبک همو، موسیقی همو، کل چیز 'the same style, same music, everything'

و چرا همو گروه خواننده های، موسیقی را استفاده می کنی؟ 'And why use the same group of singers [and the same] music?'

I found this, which lists "همان (همو)," and it apparently has similar meanings in some parts of southwestern :!: Iran. That's why I was wondering how widely used this is.

Anyway, the Iranian song I'm trying to translate this time is "Ye Dokhtar Daram Shah Nadareh" by Hassan Shamaizadeh, which, if I understand correctly, is a relatively well-known song! (It's also the first one I ever found the lyrics for out of the songs I know). As usual, I've written each line out only once:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fRnASdbUo0
Lyrics:

یه دختر دارم شاه نداره
صورتی داره ماه نداره
از خوشگلی تا نداره
به کس کسونش نمیدم
به همه کسونش نمیدم
به راه دورش نمیدم
به حرف زورش نمیدم
به کسی میدم که کس باشه
پیرهن تنش اطلس باشه

شاه میاد با لشکرش
شاهزاده ها دور برش
واسه پسر کوچیکترش
آیا بدم آیا ندم؟
به کسی میدم که تک باشه
ملِک باشه ملَک باشه

دختر من رفیق من
هم نفس شفیق من
نگین انگشتر من
عقیق من عقیق من
دختر من یار بابا
شب شب تار بابا
تو این گلستون جهان
نو گل بی خار بابا

به این و اونش نمیدم
به همه نشونش نمیدم
به خواستگارش نمیدم
به هر دیارش نمیدم

شاه شهر ما میاد
با صد برو بیا میاد
با گنج هدیه ها میاد

My attempt at a translation:

I have a daughter that the Shah doesn't.
She has a face that the moon doesn't.
There is no match for (her) beauty.
I won't give her (away) to just anybody.
I won't give her to everybody!
I won't give her (up) to (go) a long way (away).
I won't give her (away) unfairly.
I'll give her to somebody who is somebody,
On whose body the shirt is (made of) satin.

The Shah comes with his army
(With the) princes far from his side.
For his youngest son,
Should I give her away or should I not?
I'll give her to someone who's special,
Who's a king, who's an angel.

My daughter (is) my friend,
My own compassionate spirit,
The gem of my finger,
My carnelian, my carnelian.
My daughter (is) her father's beloved,
Every cloudy night of her father's,
Her father's fresh, thornless flower
In this garden of the world.

I won't give her to this (guy) and that.
I won't show her off to everyone.
I won't give her to a suitor.
I won't give her to every country.

The Shah comes to our city.
He comes with a lot of fuss.
He comes with the treasure of gifts.

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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby eskandar » 2019-08-02, 20:19

vijayjohn wrote:
eskandar wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:چید (in قبای چید ز بلبل داره یار جان) = چیده‎? not sure what your question is here

Can چید be a participle rather than a finite verb? (What about other past-tense forms, e.g. کرد? And do they have to be in third person?).

If it were a participle it would (should) be چیده or کرده etc. To be honest I'm not totally sure what is going on here - maybe the ه is dropped to fit the meter, or maybe this is an acceptable formation in Afghan Persian that I'm just unaware of.

لبهای مرا به ساعتی چرخ
بر ساقر خویش بسته بگذر

Did you mean ساغر ?

I found this, which lists "همان (همو)," and it apparently has similar meanings in some parts of southwestern :!: Iran. That's why I was wondering how widely used this is.

Makes sense! It may exist in other dialects as well for all I know. The fact that this appears in southwestern Iran as well as in Afghanistan (to the northeast) could be the result of historical migrations (reminds me of the affinities between Baluchi and Kurdish), or just coincidence, or something else. Some southwestern Iranian Persian dialects share features with Caspian languages which standard Persian lacks, and I was always intrigued by how basilectal Hindi varieties from the geographic fringes of the Hindi belt seemed to share things with each other that were not found in standard Hindi.
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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby vijayjohn » 2019-08-02, 21:55

eskandar wrote:Did you mean ساغر ?

Yeah, I think I keep getting confused about how to spell it because of ساقی. :P I wonder whether they're related! (I know ساقی comes from Arabic سقى, but I can't tell where ساغر comes from).
I was always intrigued by how basilectal Hindi varieties from the geographic fringes of the Hindi belt seemed to share things with each other that were not found in standard Hindi.

This is also true of peripheral Indo-Aryan language varieties in general, but IIRC they tend to be shared retentions.

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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby eskandar » 2019-08-04, 14:02

vijayjohn wrote:My attempt at a translation:

I won't give her (away) unfairly. or "by force"

(With the) princes far from his side. around him; دور [و] بر (pronounced "dowr-o-bar", sometimes shortened to "dowr-e bar" or "dowr-e var" in speech) means "around"

My own compassionate spirit, compassionate confidant/trusted friend (هم نفس "ham-nafas", lit. [someone with whom you have the] same breath, is an expression for an intimate friend or confidant)
The gem of my finger ring

Every cloudy night of her father's, Night is the dark night of [her] father['s] (Persian doesn't use reduplication in this way, so you should read it as شب، شب تار بابا ). This line contrasts with the previous line, meaning something like "my daughter is her father's beloved, whereas as for me, my nights are dark"


vijayjohn wrote:
eskandar wrote:Did you mean ساغر ?

Yeah, I think I keep getting confused about how to spell it because of ساقی. :P I wonder whether they're related! (I know ساقی comes from Arabic سقى, but I can't tell where ساغر comes from).

No relation, just a coincidence that they both involve things related to drinking. The etymology of ساغر is not entirely clear to me but it doesn't seem to be from Arabic.
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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby vijayjohn » 2019-08-05, 6:49

Thanks as always!

I'm toying with the idea of using more Tajik songs in future to learn more new words, possibly even some Tajik-specific vocabulary. I wouldn't translate them (because how would I figure out what I got right or wrong?), but maybe I can still use them even if they haven't already been translated.

Anyway, the song I've attempted to translate this time is part of a song chain! It's "Degar Ashkam Marez," a song in Dari from Afghanistan by Ahmad Zahir that has the same tune as the Russian song Дорогой длинною and the American song "Those Were the Days":
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKxwD-plvGY
Lyrics:

زیبا نگارم به من نگاه کن
طاقت ندارم به هجر تو
این شرار عشق آتشینت
سوخته است دل و جانم

دیگر اشکم مریز، دیگر اشکم مریز
زیبای من چشمان من کور شد
اشکها از چشم من ریزد چو بارانها

محو آن زلفان سیاهت من
محو آن لبان گلگونت
محو آن دو چشم سیاهت من
کرده تباهم زیبایم

My attempt at a translation:

Look at me, my beautiful dear!
I can't stand being separated from you.
This flame of your fiery love
Has burned my heart and soul.

Don't make me cry anymore! Don't make me cry anymore!
My beautiful, my eyes have gone blind!
May the tears rain from my eyes like storms!

I am fascinated by those black tresses of yours,
Fascinated by those rose-colored lips of yours.
I am fascinated by those two black eyes of yours.
They have destroyed me, my beautiful!

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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby eskandar » 2019-08-05, 17:18

vijayjohn wrote:My attempt at a translation: ...

Perfect, nothing to correct!
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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby Antea » 2019-08-05, 20:58

I don’t know if maybe you can recommend some YouTube channel or video in Farsi, about travels or interesting places (also inside Iran). My level s very basic, but with the images maybe it will be easier for me.

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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby eskandar » 2019-08-06, 3:49

Antea wrote:I don’t know if maybe you can recommend some YouTube channel or video in Farsi, about travels or interesting places (also inside Iran). My level s very basic, but with the images maybe it will be easier for me.


I recommend you start with the videos for Persian of Iran Today. Depending on your level, you can review simple dialogues in the Class Videos for Volume One, or skip ahead to Cafe Denj which is really good for intermediate learners. Otherwise, see if any of these interest you:

This guy has lots of travel vlogs in various parts of Iran.

Couchsurfing in Iran
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqK5z8vNPV4

Iranian couple traveling around Iran
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsi_ExKydVA

Longer documentary about Esfahan, one of the most beautiful cities in Iran
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Z_tmB_Alck


In general many of the videos on this channel might cover what you're looking for, especially the "Iran-e-Aziz" videos which are about different Iranian cities and regions.
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Antea
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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby Antea » 2019-08-06, 8:02

eskandar wrote:I recommend you start with the videos for Persian of Iran Today. Depending on your level, you can review simple dialogues in the Class Videos for Volume One, or skip ahead to Cafe Denj which is really good for intermediate learners. Otherwise, see if any of these interest you.


Thanks! :D

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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby księżycowy » 2019-08-07, 10:15

I'm curious, Eskander, what would you recommend as a good textbook (or even better, textbook series)?

For reference, I know no Persian and can't read the Arabic script (yet).

Thanks. :)

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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby eskandar » 2019-08-07, 16:19

księżycowy wrote:I'm curious, Eskander, what would you recommend as a good textbook (or even better, textbook series)?

There are quite a few out there and all of them have their own strengths and weaknesses. The biggest divide is between textbooks that emphasize written vs. spoken Persian. The language is diglossic--though not nearly to the same degree as Arabic--so while there is a lot of overlap between the two registers, simply learning one isn't enough to fully understand the other, and I haven't found a textbook that covers both equally well.

Thackston's An Introduction to Persian is an excellent start for written Persian (particularly literary Persian), especially if you pair it with Mace's Persian Grammar. It's not very good for the spoken language. If you are more interested in reading Persian, start here. There is also the advantage that if you speak formal/literary Persian, people will have no trouble understanding you, though you probably won't understand that much of colloquial Persian without studying it.

Persian of Iran Today is free and is quite good for spoken Persian. It's designed for classroom use, but I think you could use it for self-study as well. It also teaches written Persian, but I'd say that isn't this textbook's greatest strength. If you're primarily interested in spoken Persian, or if you want to cover both registers to start and then go deeper into grammar and literature later, start here.
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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby księżycowy » 2019-08-07, 16:58

Thanks!

If I were inclined to use Persian of Iran Today, I'm sure I could get some help and corrections here. :wink:

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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby eskandar » 2019-08-07, 19:00

Definitely!
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Re: Persian Study Group

Postby vijayjohn » 2019-08-09, 19:35

Maybe I can help with that, too. I'm kind of tempted to go through it before you do, so I might do that. :P Also, thanks for the videos, Eskandar Bhai! I found a few YouTube channels/videos myself; there's also a travelogue series from Afghanistan that's mostly in Dari (though a few of the episodes in the first season at least are in Pashto instead). :)
eskandar wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:My attempt at a translation: ...

Perfect, nothing to correct!

Yay, thanks! I finally managed to translate a whole song without making any mistakes! :D

The Iranian song I'm learning new words from this time is "To Mesl-e-Goli" by Said Pursaid:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7rTNXYyGWA
Romanized lyrics and translation: https://lyricstranslate.com/en/mesle-go ... lower.html

And the non-Iranian one is "Zad Ze Berahmi," a rendition of an Afghan ghazal sung by Pakistani singer Noor Jehan:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Py8v2my34WY
Lyrics and translation (and another rendition): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=myCYhad5JRY

Vocabulary (tbh, this time, the one term I'm particularly confused about is قر دار):
خوشگلی - beauty
تا - match, double, twin (in addition to 'until', etc.)
به حرف زور - unfairly, by force
پیرهن - shirt
اطلس - satin (in addition to atlas :P)
ملَک - angel
هم نفس - confidant, trusted friend
شفیق - compassionate
نگین - gem
انگشتر - ring
عقیق - carnelian
نشان دادن - to show
خواستگار - suitor
دیار - country
برو بیا, بیا و برو - fuss, ado, bustle
هجر - separation
شرار - flame
آتشین - fiery
اشک ریختن - to cry, weep
محو - fascination
لبان - (plural of لب 'lip' in this case)
گلگون - red, rose, rose-colored, ruddy
تباه - destroyed, ruined, spoiled
عشوه - (means roughly the same thing as ناز?)
سرسپردن - to surrender, obey
اندازه - measurement, amount, size
بندگی کردن - to give (formal/polite term)
مدیون - indebted; debtor
بیرحمی - ruthlessness, mercilessness
یاری - friendship, help
کار کسی را ساختن - to kill someone
سخت جانی - strength, hardheartedness, endurance
نگریستن (present stem نگر) - to look
خجلت - shame
شرمساری - shame, disgrace, confusion
ضعف - weakness (duh, I should've guessed this from Arabic...)
ناتوانی - frailty, weakness, failure, inability
بردباری - endurance, fortitude
ضیافت - banquet, feast
خلعت - robe of honor
مرقوم - written, marked, aforesaid
کامل - perfect (in addition to 'complete' and various other meanings)
اکتساب - acquisition
قاعده - rule, custom
نشست و برخاست - association, sitting together, friendship
بزم - banquet, party
آموختن - to teach, learn
جمیع - the whole, all
فراز - up
متنوع - diverse, various
آرام بخش - comforting
اتفاق افتادن - to happen
سیل کردن - to look (in Dari)
-وار(ی) - like, resembling
شور دادن - to shake (in Dari)
منحصر - confined, limited, exclusive
وجه - manner, way (in addition to some other meanings)
ربط - relation, connection
بلد بودن - to know
تشکیل دادن - to form, organize
چرخیدن (present stem چرخ) - to rotate, circle, revolve
جور - kind, sort (along with various other meanings)
خاص - specific (in addition to 'special' and a few other meanings)
مخصوص - specific (also in addition to 'special' and a few other meanings)
عروس - bride (not really a word I didn't already know, just one that I easily confuse with عروسی, at least if I'm not careful)
داماد - groom
قر دار - pleated? (Context: دامنهای قر دار)
الاغ - donkey
ایالات متحده آمریکا - United States of America
شرق میانه - Middle East (at least in Dari...)
اجراییه - executive
خلبان - pilot
خط - line (in addition to writing, letter, etc., hence خط خدمات = service line)
مراقبت - attention, care
حین - moment, time
تخفیف - reduction, discount, mitigation
ویژه - special, exclusive
گذرنامه - passport
توقف - stop(ping)
بالاخره - at last, finally
تصمیم گرفتن - to decide
شرکت - company
تخت جمشید - Persepolis
کولر - air conditioner
راهنما - guide
در طی - on, in?
منظره (pl. مناظر) - sight, spectacle, scene(ry)
شیرینی فروشی - confectioner's, confectionery
مسکن - dwelling, residence, house


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