Short questions

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gotbetter
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Re: Short questions

Postby gotbetter » 2019-03-01, 20:47

Another question. Is there any difference in meaning between these two?

کسی را نگاه کردن

به کسی نگاه کردن

I've seen it both ways, so I think they both seem to be correct. Is that so?



In case nobody notices it, I'll just say here: please can someone also answer my previous question (about یکه شناس) on the page before this? Last post on page 123.

Thank you

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eskandar
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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2019-03-08, 5:21

gotbetter wrote:Hello. What does this word mean, please? Can someone provide a definition / translation in English?

یکه شناس

Someone who is extremely faithful to (or even reliant on) someone else.

Also, should these kind of words (words that end in شناس) be written as one word with a ZWNJ, or as two words?
Generally these compounds should be written together, with ZWNJ, but you'll find them written separately just as often, if not more often.

Also, is یکه meant to have a tashid? Online I found it transliterated as yekkešenās (with two letter Ks).

Yes. But as in most other words the tashdid is pronounced but not written.

gotbetter wrote:Another question. Is there any difference in meaning between these two?

کسی را نگاه کردن

به کسی نگاه کردن

I've seen it both ways, so I think they both seem to be correct. Is that so?

Yes, I think both are correct and equally used.
Please correct my mistakes in any language.

gotbetter
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Re: Short questions

Postby gotbetter » 2019-03-08, 22:44

Thank you very much for answering my questions, Eskandar.

gotbetter
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Re: Short questions

Postby gotbetter » 2019-03-08, 23:36

Another question:

In colloquial conversational Persian, I hear this a lot:

هستش
instead of
است / ه / هست

and
نیستش
instead of
نیست

What I want to know is, are those forms considered grammatically correct to use when talking, or are people who talk like that considered to be uneducated people who have terrible grammar?

For example, is the هستش and نیستش phenomenon somewhat equivalent to saying "ain't" in English instead of "isn't"?

I just want to know so that I can know whether I should use these forms myself or not.

(Just to be clear, I'm talking about spoken Persian. I'm aware that it would be totally wrong to use these forms in formal writing, but they're widely used when speaking).

Thank you

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eskandar
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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2019-03-10, 21:37

gotbetter wrote:I just want to know so that I can know whether I should use these forms myself or not.

Yes, go ahead and use them; while as you noted they aren't used in writing, they're perfectly acceptable in normal spoken Persian, not "marked" in the way that "ain't" is in English.
Please correct my mistakes in any language.

gotbetter
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Re: Short questions

Postby gotbetter » 2019-03-11, 21:17

Thank you, Eskandar.


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