Short questions

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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2017-08-11, 6:48

Talha wrote:Am I also correct in hearing the Persian for "autumn" پاييز as پائيز? Any reasoning or general principle for that?
ممنون

You are hearing it correctly. I'm not sure about any specific principle that would apply here except that hamza may become ya and vice versa often enough in Persian.

Talha wrote:Also in Farzad, the answer for Unit 01 ex. 2a. (1) Good morning, Mehri, welcome! - "welcome" is given as خوش آمدى. She doesn't give that version in the chapter. Mistake or variant?

Just a variant. Here are the possible variations:

خوش آمدی - informal, written
خوش آمدید - formal or plural, written
خوش اومدی - informal, colloquial
خوش اومدین - formal or plural, colloquial
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Re: Short questions

Postby rvxvwi » 2017-10-12, 22:14

Hello,
I was wondering if someone could please translate this poem/quote by Rumi from English to Farsi please?

"I once had a thousand desires. But in my one desire to know you, all else melted away."

I truly appreciate it,
Thank you

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Re: Short questions

Postby Az.chabok » 2017-12-22, 16:37

rvxvwi wrote:Hello,
I was wondering if someone could please translate this poem/quote by Rumi from English to Farsi please?

"I once had a thousand desires. But in my one desire to know you, all else melted away."

I truly appreciate it,
Thank you



به فارسی:
زمانی هزاران آرزو داشتم. اما در آرزوی شناختن تو، تمام آرزوهای دیگر ذوب شدند

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Re: Short questions

Postby purgatio » 2018-03-07, 19:48

Hi.
Could you please help me to translate the word coffin? How do you say coffin in farsi (ancient persian language).
Is it correct to say تابوت?

Regards.

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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2018-04-23, 4:54

تابوت is correct.
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Re: Short questions

Postby Ser » 2018-08-09, 4:30

I saw your PSA, and I do have two questions about Persian.

In the Wikipedia article on Persian literature, you can find this paragraph:
No single text devoted to literary criticism has survived from Pre-Islamic Iran. However, some essays in Pahlavi, such as "Ayin-e name nebeshtan" (Principles of Writing Book) and "Bab-e edteda’I-ye" (Kalileh o Demneh), have been considered as literary criticism (Zarrinkoub, 1959).[10]

Should I correct the translation of "Ayin-e name nebeshtan" to "Book writing principles"?

Also, why is the term zend also spellable as "zand"? Does it have to do with both variants being acceptable in modern Persian? (Or perhaps Middle Persian?)

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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2018-08-09, 5:25

Ser wrote:In the Wikipedia article on Persian literature, you can find this paragraph:
No single text devoted to literary criticism has survived from Pre-Islamic Iran. However, some essays in Pahlavi, such as "Ayin-e name nebeshtan" (Principles of Writing Book) and "Bab-e edteda’I-ye" (Kalileh o Demneh), have been considered as literary criticism (Zarrinkoub, 1959).[10]

Should I correct the translation of "Ayin-e name nebeshtan" to "Book writing principles"?

Depends on how deep you want to dig in here. Those lines on Wikipedia are basically plagiarized from here, with added typos. You could translate it as "book-writing principles" - here name could mean either 'book' or 'letter' - though according to Parsinejad the work is about letter-writing, not book-writing. I don't have access to the Zarrinkub book he's quoting from, but the whole thing seems a bit spurious to me, especially since the word was nāmag and not nāme in Pahlavi/Middle Persian. (Name is a later, post-Islamic form of the word.)

Also, why is the term zend also spellable as "zand"? Does it have to do with both variants being acceptable in modern Persian? (Or perhaps Middle Persian?)

The word is more properly transliterated as zand but often appears as zend in English simply because the latter English spelling predates precise transliteration rules; it goes back to early 18th century English (and Latin) writing about Zoroastrianism. In that sense it's a bit comparable to the older standard 'Parsee' vs. the currently more acceptable spelling 'Parsi'.
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Plural for [فی] (tribute, price)

Postby repl2 » 2018-08-10, 4:11

What is the plural form of the word [فی] (tribute, price)?

I am searching for the etymology of the Crimean Tatar word "fiyat"(price).
I think it could be a plural form of this Perisan word.


BTW

I think it related to the English words "fee" and "veal"!

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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2018-08-10, 5:38

The word is from Arabic, not Persian (though it may have entered the Turkic languages via Persian). See here for the etymology (it's the same in Turkish). No relation to English "fee" or "veal".
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Re: Short questions

Postby voron » 2018-08-10, 9:53

Nişanyan says that it is plural of the preposition في . What?! :o

https://www.etimolojiturkce.com gives a more plausible explanation that it comes from the word فئة.

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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2018-08-10, 21:48

Wow, I definitely missed that in the Nişanyan etymology. I agree that فئة is the more likely source.
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Re: Short questions

Postby ahm313 » 2018-10-02, 10:59

hello everyone :)
i am still a beginner in learning Farsi, and i wanted to translate the following:
https://soundcloud.com/ahmad-makhzoum-2 ... aba-l-fadl

it has only 3 sentences and its 20 secs don't worry :)

but i couldn't reproduce all the words,
any help would be much appreciated :) and if translated even better

many thanks

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Re: Short questions

Postby Vlürch » 2018-10-24, 20:35

So, I have a couple of questions:

What's the exact meaning of بارگاه (bârgâh)? Wiktionary says "palace; shrine", this site says "a royal court or palace, the hall of audience", this site says "camp, court; hall of audience, court", this says it's "a hall of justice" and this says "court or palace". Can it mean all those things, or is it something more vague and hard to translate into English?

Why is the plural of آدم (âdam) آدمها (âdamhâ) and not آدمان (âdamân), or at least the former is more common? And if the latter is incorrect, why are there so many results on Google for it as well? Is it just a mistake stemming from people wanting to refer to people as living things or something, or that it sounds better?

Then the stupidest question of all: why is را (râ) written separately and not as a suffix? I can find quite a lot of results on Google for, for example, فرشتگان‌را (fereštegân-ra) and even فرشتگانرا (fereštegânrâ), although obviously not as many as فرشتگان را (fereštegân râ). Is it acceptable, even though of course the preference is to write it separately? Or are they just misspellings or intentionally non-standard or whatever? I mean, it just looks so much better written without the space... :lol:

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How to interlink Persian and other Indo-European/Indo-Germanic languages?

Postby langmon » 2018-11-10, 11:48

Really would like to start learning at least a bit of Persian.
How to use one's existing knowledge of Indo-European/Indo-Germanic languages (German, English, Spanish, French, ...) for putting a foot into the Persian door, figuratively speaking?
- Any two-digit no. of lang. learned in rotation
- Botany (EN, DE, ...)


SomehowGeekyPolyglot = SomewhatGeekyPolyglot = SGP

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Help me to decipher a note :)

Postby ewaewka » 2018-11-12, 13:55

Hi!
I have no idea if this is a right place to post this...
I am taking my very first steps in Persian language and this means I am learning to recognize the letters :lol:
So please take it easy on me ;)

I have a hand-written note which I would like to read, but hand-written text differs quite a bit from what we see in print or digital texts.

My question is to ONLY rewrite the note in persian, so that I can have some "fun" and a challenge to work furter on it. I just need to find the letters and words in it :D

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1XiF-hvGcm587C2b_6i7wGcV3v74JhNAR/view?usp=sharing

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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2018-11-28, 5:25

ahm313 wrote:hello everyone :)
i am still a beginner in learning Farsi, and i wanted to translate the following:
https://soundcloud.com/ahmad-makhzoum-2 ... aba-l-fadl

خورشید من ابا الفضل
khorshid-e man Aba'l-Fazl
"My sun, Aba'l-Fazl"
امید من ابا الفضل
omid-e man Aba'l-Fazl
"My hope, Aba'l-Fazl"

The second line is repeated.
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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2018-11-28, 5:35

Vlürch wrote:What's the exact meaning of بارگاه (bârgâh)? Wiktionary says "palace; shrine", this site says "a royal court or palace, the hall of audience", this site says "camp, court; hall of audience, court", this says it's "a hall of justice" and this says "court or palace". Can it mean all those things, or is it something more vague and hard to translate into English?

Yes, it can mean all of those things depending on context. Just as the English word "temple" can mean all kinds of things varying by context as well. The most common use is "shrine" in contemporary Iranian Persian. Google image search the word for some examples.

Why is the plural of آدم (âdam) آدمها (âdamhâ) and not آدمان (âdamân), or at least the former is more common? And if the latter is incorrect, why are there so many results on Google for it as well? Is it just a mistake stemming from people wanting to refer to people as living things or something, or that it sounds better?
Good question - I don't know why it doesn't take the animate plural. آدم‌ها is definitely (more) correct and sounds better. آدمان is rare. If you look at the Google search results for آدمان, you see mostly (1) results in Arabic or other languages (so you aren't actually seeing results of people using it incorrectly, just seeing results in a different language), or (2) examples where it's being used poetically (probably for the sake of rhyme or meter).

Then the stupidest question of all: why is را (râ) written separately and not as a suffix? I can find quite a lot of results on Google for, for example, فرشتگان‌را (fereštegân-ra) and even فرشتگانرا (fereštegânrâ), although obviously not as many as فرشتگان را (fereštegân râ). Is it acceptable, even though of course the preference is to write it separately? Or are they just misspellings or intentionally non-standard or whatever? I mean, it just looks so much better written without the space... :lol:

Also not a stupid question. It's probably written separately for the same reason that the plural ending ها or the durative verbal prefix می are usually written separately: it aids reading comprehension, helping to avoid confusion (otherwise you'd have to wonder if ماجرا is one word or ماج followed by را , for example). It's not really acceptable to write it attached, though it does happen.
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Re: Short questions

Postby Vlürch » 2018-12-05, 16:06

eskandar wrote:Yes, it can mean all of those things depending on context. Just as the English word "temple" can mean all kinds of things varying by context as well. The most common use is "shrine" in contemporary Iranian Persian.

Thanks!
eskandar wrote:Google image search the word for some examples.

That was the first thing I did (well, second thing if looking it up in different online dictionaries counts as the first thing), but I'm honestly not familiar enough with Iranian architecture or anything to have been able to figure out by myself what kind of buildings those are except that at least some of them are used for religious purposes, which wouldn't seem out of the ordinary with a palace or generally "palace-like" buildings either.
eskandar wrote:Good question - I don't know why it doesn't take the animate plural. آدم‌ها is definitely (more) correct and sounds better. آدمان is rare.

Alright, so I shouldn't use it if I want to write grammatically correct Persian. What if I'm writing lyrics with a couple of lines in Persian and use it, likely with some non-Persian words thrown in even in those sentences just for fun (and to make it even more confusing), would it still be Persian enough or would it practically become a conlang? I know that's a question there's probably no exact objective answer to and trying to determine when a given language stops being that language could get kinda "philosophical", but... yeah, now this is a stupid question. :P
eskandar wrote:If you look at the Google search results for آدمان, you see mostly (1) results in Arabic or other languages (so you aren't actually seeing results of people using it incorrectly, just seeing results in a different language), or (2) examples where it's being used poetically (probably for the sake of rhyme or meter).

Weird, probably about half of the results I get are in Persian. :o But my level in Persian is so low that I couldn't have hoped to be able to tell that they're mostly poetic or whatever (one of the results is even BBC!), so thanks for clarifying.
eskandar wrote:Also not a stupid question. It's probably written separately for the same reason that the plural ending ها or the durative verbal prefix می are usually written separately: it aids reading comprehension, helping to avoid confusion (otherwise you'd have to wonder if ماجرا is one word or ماج followed by را , for example). It's not really acceptable to write it attached, though it does happen.

Ok, so is it more correct to write it separately with a space than separately without a space? This site implies the latter is more common, but at least googling various words seems to indicate a full space being more common; is that just for convenience, but in handwriting and stuff it's written separately without a space? Or is it always more common with a full space and that site is wrong?

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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2018-12-05, 16:26

Vlürch wrote:Ok, so is it more correct to write it separately with a space than separately without a space? This site implies the latter is more common, but at least googling various words seems to indicate a full space being more common; is that just for convenience, but in handwriting and stuff it's written separately without a space? Or is it always more common with a full space and that site is wrong?

را is more correctly written separately with a space (کتاب را), and this is far more common as well. However the rule is different for the plural marker ها which is supposed to be written separately but without a space (کتاب‌ها). That's the most correct and most common way, and it uses the ZWNJ. However, especially on the internet, you will also see it written with a space (کتاب ها) and even without a ZWNJ (کتابها) because some people on older devices can't easily produce the ZWNJ. So this one can be kind of all over the place.
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Re: Short questions

Postby gotbetter » 2019-02-28, 20:55

Hello. What does this word mean, please? Can someone provide a definition / translation in English?

یکه شناس

I know it's a word because I found it on Forvo.

Also, should these kind of words (words that end in شناس) be written as one word with a ZWNJ, or as two words?

یکه‌شناس
یکه شناس
کدوم درسته؟

Also, is یکه meant to have a tashid? Online I found it transliterated as yekkešenās (with two letter Ks).
یکه
یکّه
کدوم درسته؟

پیشاپیش ممنونم


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