Short questions

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LondonA1
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Re: Short questions

Postby LondonA1 » 2016-05-31, 5:37

buman wrote:سلام

Question about the verbs رفتن and ترک کردن

1) Can both be said ?

* a) مرد از دکان رفت
b) مرد از دکان ترک کرد

(The man left [from] the store)

* not to be mistaken with " مرد به دکان رفت " (the man went to the store)

2) Is the " از " mandatory each time we say we leave from a place (versus the English "I left the store - "Elvis left the building" :) ?

Again, many thanks.

Oliver


Hi Oliver,

Save yourself a huge amount of time and learn how Iranians themselves avoid these problems:

Someone asks you "Ketābam kojāst?" (Where's my book?). You threw it out but "Ketābe shomā-ro birun kardam" is too long, so you just say "Birunesh kardam" - "I threw it out". No need for that pesky "rā" at all!

You're going to see this everywhere because it's how people speak. Didamesh = I saw it. Mibinish? = do you see it? Ki gereftesh?! = who took it?!

Same as we use all these contractions in English such as "Isn't" or "I've", Persian speakers have their own shorthand phrases. Nobody says in English "I have not seen him today", we just say "I've not seen him" or even simply "not seen him"
:)

More often than not, the rā in spoken and even written Persian is these days employed to avoid confusion in longer sentences; people will often complete ignore the rules of grammar in small, quick phrases because the meaning is obvious to a native speaker so they just dispense of the rā.

NonGrata
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Re: Short questions

Postby NonGrata » 2016-05-31, 14:40

Can y please translate this

maanba in amari ke dari midi az kojjast

LondonA1
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Re: Short questions

Postby LondonA1 » 2016-05-31, 15:53

NonGrata wrote:Can y please translate this

maanba in amari ke dari midi az kojjast


Not sure what the "maanba" is supposed to be but it says something like "But these statistics that you're seeing, where are they from?"

NonGrata
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Re: Short questions

Postby NonGrata » 2016-05-31, 16:05

LondonA1 wrote:
NonGrata wrote:Can y please translate this

maanba in amari ke dari midi az kojjast


Not sure what the "maanba" is supposed to be but it says something like "But these statistics that you're seeing, where are they from?"


Thank you so much.

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Mehrdad
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Re: Short questions

Postby Mehrdad » 2016-06-01, 12:38

LondonA1 wrote:
NonGrata wrote:Can y please translate this

maanba in amari ke dari midi az kojjast


Not sure what the "maanba" is supposed to be but it says something like "But these statistics that you're seeing, where are they from?"


maanba= منبع = source

= What's/Where's the source of these statistics that you're giving?

Good Luck.

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Re: Short questions

Postby ARK » 2016-06-16, 15:04

How to write "white" in Farsi? وایت or هوایت

DreamBig89
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Re: Short questions

Postby DreamBig89 » 2016-06-19, 13:29

What is the origin/meaning of the Iranian surname Ramezanpour? I guess it is Persian since it is used by Iranians? :)

Gomrah
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Re: Short questions

Postby Gomrah » 2016-06-23, 7:34

ARK wrote:How to write "white" in Farsi? وایت or هوایت

وایت is the correct form.
تاجیکم, زبانم فارسیست

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Re: Short questions

Postby Gomrah » 2016-06-23, 7:42

DreamBig89 wrote:What is the origin/meaning of the Iranian surname Ramezanpour? I guess it is Persian since it is used by Iranians? :)

I believe it's رمضانپور. It's made up of 2 words رمضان (a month in the Islamic calendar, sometimes used as a first name or last name) and پور (somewhat archaic word for son, mostly used in last names).

So the meaning would be "the son of Ramadan".
تاجیکم, زبانم فارسیست

iodalach93

Re: Short questions

Postby iodalach93 » 2016-07-17, 11:38

سلام,


Today, as I was reading, I run into the expression بدین ترتیب.
I suppose it might be synonymous with به این ترتیب. Yet that بدین puzzles me.

What is it? Is it a contraction of beh + in? Is it a relic from Middle Persian? And how is it to be read? Bedin or badin?

از کمکتان سپاسگزارم.

Iskandar
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Re: Short questions

Postby Iskandar » 2016-07-17, 12:51

Hi, I'm learning Persian, and I'm doing some trial & error by trying to translate some songs. Could someone maybe translate these lines for me?
وقتی که دلم از زندگی پره // مثل اون درختیه که تشنه می بره
از این دنیا که مثله زندونه // این و بدون که اینجوری نمی مونه
Thanks in advance!

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Mehrdad
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Re: Short questions

Postby Mehrdad » 2016-07-21, 6:11

iodalach93 wrote:
سلام,


Today, as I was reading, I run into the expression بدین ترتیب.
I suppose it might be synonymous with به این ترتیب. Yet that بدین puzzles me.

What is it? Is it a contraction of beh + in? Is it a relic from Middle Persian? And how is it to be read? Bedin or badin?

از کمکتان سپاسگزارم.


بدین ترتیب = به این ترتیب
It's read 'Bedin' & is more formal. Both mean 'So' or 'This Way'.

So/ This way you can't beat terrorism. بدین تریب شما نمی توانید تروریسم را شکست دهید

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eskandar
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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2016-07-21, 18:50

Just to add to the above, you're right that it's basically a relic from Middle Persian, where the word به was pad. It later became bad in early New Persian, then ba and finally be in contemporary Tehrani Persian. So بدین is basically an archaism where the 'd' of bad has survived in certain compounds like this one.
Please correct my mistakes in any language.

iodalach93

Re: Short questions

Postby iodalach93 » 2016-07-21, 22:51

از جواب‌های شما خیلی متشکرم، مهرداد و اسکندر.

Just out of curiosity, can one also encounter forms like بدان (be + ân)? Or only بدین exists?

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eskandar
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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2016-07-22, 7:59

بدان also exists and can be found in similarly formal/archaic contexts.
Please correct my mistakes in any language.

iodalach93

Re: Short questions

Postby iodalach93 » 2016-07-22, 22:06

Thank you again for the info :)

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Re: Short questions

Postby marmorbleikur » 2016-07-25, 10:46

(I hope this is the right thread - I'm still trying to find my way around this forum) Hi everyone, I have quite a few pretty simple questions if that's okay. I'm only just starting to learn Persian (I'm as beginner-y as you can get! :D ) but the book I'm using at the moment is a reference grammar, so there are no exercises to practice with. As a result, I have no idea whether I'm interpreting things correctly or not! So if anyone can help it'd be greatly appreciated.

Below are some notes/statements, and some questions. Would you mind checking to see if what I've written/summarised is accurate, and could you try and answer the questions? I'm aware I'm asking quite a lot of things, so I don't mind if you only want to answer one at a time. :D

(And I know I must have made a ton of mistakes with the script - sorry, I'm still trying to master that too!)

1. By default, nouns can be either definite or indefinite (depending on the context), but you can add the suffix -i to make it clear that a noun is indefinite. So:

خرس (xers) - a bear, the bear
خرسی (xers-i) - a bear

2. Demonstrative adjectives precede the noun:

این خرس (in xers) - this bear
آن خرس (ân xers) - that bear

(And I'm assuming that nouns with these demonstratives are definite by default, so you couldn't say این خرسی (in xers-i), right?)

3. Are adjectives used as complements "modified" in any way, in very simple phrases? My book gives a few examples following the pattern of demonstrative + noun + adjective, but doesn't actually say anything.

خرس قهوه ای است (xers qahve'i ast) - the bear is brown
این خرس قهوه ای است (in xers qahve'i ast) - this bear is brown
آن خرس قهوه ای است (ân xers qahve'i ast) - that bear is brown

4. A basic/non-indefinite noun takes the ezâfe when used with an attributive adjective:

خرس قهوه ای (xers-e qahve'i) - the brown bear, a brown bear
این خرس قهوه ای (in xers-e qahve'i) - this brown bear

and any additional adjectives are linked together with the ezâfe:

خرس بزرگ قهوه ای (xers bozorg-e qahve'i) - the big brown bear
این خرس بزرگ قهوه ای (in xers-e bozorg-e qahve'i) - this big brown bear
خرس قهوه ای بزرگ (xers qahve'i-ye bozorg) - the brown big bear

Is there any preferred order when using multiple adjectives? Like how in English "big brown" sounds much more natural than "brown big".

5. There are two ways of using adjectives with indefinite nouns (nouns with the -i suffix). You can add ezâfe to the noun and -i to the adjective, or the final adjective if there's more than one, but adjectives already ending in -i are unmodified:

خرس قهوه ای (xers-e qahve'i) - a brown bear
خرس بزرگی (xers-e bozorg-i) - a big bear
خرس بزرگ قهوه ای (xers-e bozorg-e qahve'i) - a big brown bear
خرس قهوه ای بزرگی (xers-e qahve'i-ye bozorg-i) - a brown big bear

Is the ezâfe still used to link multiple adjectives in the above indefinite construction?

The -i suffix may also be added to the noun, with a series of adjectives being linked by ezâfe or o:

خرسی قهوه ای (xers-i qahve'i) - a brown bear
خرسی بزرگ (xers-i bozorg) - a big bear
خرسی بزرگ و قهوه ای (xers-i bozorg o qahve'i)
خرسی بزرگ قهوه ای (xers-i bozorg-e qahve'i)

Is there any difference between using ezâfe or o? Are there situations where one is preferred over the other?

Sorry again for all the questions. I'm really not a very confident learner so I'm not great at just trying things out without asking first!

(Thank you very much if you can help!)

Zena
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Re: Short questions

Postby Zena » 2016-08-06, 11:06

Hello everyone, I have a small question about translation, could you tell me how to translate this sentence in Farsi :

"Yet remember: Nothing really happens..."

I would be very grateful, if anyone could help me.
Google translator siad me something like that:

با این حال به یاد داشته باشید :
هیچ چیز واقعا اتفاق می افتد

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Mehrdad
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Re: Short questions

Postby Mehrdad » 2016-08-14, 10:41

Zena wrote:
"Yet remember: Nothing really happens..."



با این حال به یاد داشته باشید :
هیچ چیز واقعا اتفاق نمی افتد

amhassanzadeh
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Re: Short questions

Postby amhassanzadeh » 2016-09-15, 21:42

What does 'del bi taab omid cheshme par az ab omid' mean?

My heart has hope and my eyes have hope?


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