Short questions

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Re: Short questions

Postby alijsh » 2009-05-07, 15:43

camelkebab wrote:هنو

is this the the talk version of hanooz? (still, yet)

Yes. But hanuz is also used. Ditto for emru(z) and diru(z).

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Re: Short questions

Postby camelkebab » 2009-05-07, 18:43

kheyli mamunam :)

بنازم اشتهاتو

fahmidam ke eshtehaa yani "appetite"

va benaazam be kesi mige ke ye chizish dostaare. in kalame az "naaz" miyaad?

vali haalaa manie in chie?

i like your appetite? it doesnt make sence :?:
it is from a typical Persian love pop song not a restaurant commercial

ba tashakore ghabli

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Re: Short questions

Postby alijsh » 2009-05-08, 3:58

nâzidan means "to boast, to plume". In such expressions it means that you are amazed of X.

benâzam eŝtehâ't'o (eŝtehâ yat râ) means: I [must] pride your appetite (it is subjunctive)

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Re: Short questions

Postby alijsh » 2009-05-08, 4:35

writewell wrote:Thank you, alijsh and camelkebab, for your help. Disappointing answer. I don't suppose there are two statements with similar sentiments that COULD be mistaken?

You're welcome. No, sorry. There is no way. It's only possible in English because of "dead" and "death". "kosht", "marg", "morde" are quite different.

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Re: Short questions

Postby writewell » 2009-05-08, 13:03

Ahhh, then I will change the circumstances. Thank you again.

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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2009-05-08, 15:25

What is the meaning of کربوبلا ? I think it must be some altered form of کربلا. I found it in a religious song بوی سیب.
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Re: Short questions

Postby camelkebab » 2009-05-08, 15:53

what does this mean and when is it used:

yaa abolfas

Fi amanellah

not sure of spelling,

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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2009-05-08, 16:48

camelkebab wrote:yaa abolfas

Fi amanellah


These are both Arabic phrases sometimes used in Persian. With the first, did you mean "yaa abolfazl" (یا ابوالفضل)? It means "O Abolfazl" (al-`Abbas, aka Abu'l Fadl, the son of `Ali, the first Imam, is an important figure for Shi'i Muslims).

Fi Amanollah (فی امان الله) is also Arabic and means literally "in God's protection" and is used as a saying for goodbye. Khoda Hafez is very similar in meaning and in use, but I think Fi Amanollah is rarely used in Persian except by very religious people.
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Re: Short questions

Postby alijsh » 2009-05-08, 17:46

@Eskandar: Yes. Karbobalâ is the same Karbalâ. It has become so for the sake of rhyme. It may also be a wordplay of Karbalâ (karb o balâ; Does karb have any meaning in Arabic?).

eskandar wrote:I think Fi Amanollah is rarely used in Persian except by very religious people.

never, in fact. We have «dar panâh e Xodâ», «be amân e Xodâ», «Xeyr piŝ» ...

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Re: Short questions

Postby eskandar » 2009-05-08, 19:11

Thanks Ali. I hadn't thought of that, but I think you're right about it being a play on words. "Karb" means "grief, sorrow, anxiety" in Arabic.

I've never heard anyone say "fi amânollâh" in Persian, but since camelkebab asked I thought maybe he had heard someone say it. I think I have heard Afghans say "bâ amân-e xodâ," though maybe they were saying "be [ba] amân-e xodâ" and I just misheard it.
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Re: Short questions

Postby camelkebab » 2009-05-08, 19:28

at the very end of this video he says "fi amaane laah" it sounds like this

very funny btw :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0wy4yL2hWI

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Re: Short questions

Postby alijsh » 2009-05-09, 2:33

eskandar wrote:Thanks Ali. I hadn't thought of that, but I think you're right about it being a play on words. "Karb" means "grief, sorrow, anxiety" in Arabic.

So «karb o balâ» means «ĝam o balâ». Nice.

eskandar wrote:I've never heard anyone say "fi amânollâh" in Persian, but since camelkebab asked I thought maybe he had heard someone say it.

That «never» was for your «rarely». You are right; Mullahs and such may say.

eskandar wrote:I think I have heard Afghans say "bâ amân-e xodâ," though maybe they were saying "be [ba] amân-e xodâ" and I just misheard it.

They say «be» az «ba» so you have probably heard «ba».

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Re: Short questions

Postby camelkebab » 2009-05-09, 14:47

thanks for your help above eskandar and alijsh

...kenaare daste khod

does "daste khod" mean himself/herself/one self ?

:hmm:

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Re: Short questions

Postby alijsh » 2009-05-09, 15:20

camelkebab wrote:...kenaare daste khod

does "daste khod" mean himself/herself/one self ?

:hmm:

خود is called «common pronoun» in Persian grammar. It can refer to any person. English «self» is similar to it but not equivalent. «kenâr e dast e xwod» means «by the hand of xwod». It points to something, which is by/near/close (French: à côté de) somebody (similar to English: at hand). The person is indicated from the context (what precedes this expression).

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Re: Short questions

Postby camelkebab » 2009-05-09, 17:25

mesle hamishe kheyli mamnun am :D omidvaaram moafagh baashid va havaalietoon baa safaa baashad :)

man ham intori miporsam :roll:

to ketaabe noam be in kalamehaa barkhord kardam ke kaamel nemifahmam

daal re he mim = mixed up? chejoori mikhoonad? darham?

"khat khati kardan" yani chi? "to draw lines" ya faghat "to draw"

baa tashakore ghabli :)

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Re: Short questions

Postby camelkebab » 2009-05-10, 10:09

عاقبت الامر
-----

how do you pronunce this: الامر

what does this word alone mean?

ba tashakore ghabli

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Re: Short questions

Postby camelkebab » 2009-05-10, 12:33

how do you say

مأیوس = disappointed

maa'yoos?

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Re: Short questions

Postby alijsh » 2009-05-10, 13:11

camelkebab wrote:daal re he mim = mixed up? chejoori mikhoonad? darham?

Yes, darham (درهم) means "mixed up; interlaced"

camelkebab wrote:"khat khati kardan" yani chi? "to draw lines" ya faghat "to draw"

Yes, to draw lines in different directions e.g. to make sth illegible

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Re: Short questions

Postby camelkebab » 2009-05-10, 13:21

mersi :)

i figured out ma'yus by myself :)

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Re: Short questions

Postby alijsh » 2009-05-10, 14:12

camelkebab wrote:عاقبت الامر
how do you pronunce this: الامر

what does this word alone mean?

drop ال (Arabic definite article) and remains امر (amr) which means "affair" in this context. âqebato'lamr means saranjâm (سرانجام) i.e. "at last". Literally: end/final of the affair. This word is not used much.


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