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Re: Hindi Greetings & Basics

Posted: 2013-06-16, 2:58
by Meera
These words are still used in Hindi though.

Re: Hindi Greetings & Basics

Posted: 2013-07-30, 1:52
by mōdgethanc
Meera wrote:These words are still used in Hindi though.
Of course they are, but the reason they're written with the -a at the end is probably because that's how they were pronounced in Sanskrit. I think Westerners were interested in Sanskrit before they were in modern Indic languages because it was the liturgical language of Hinduism and also because it was very useful to linguistics because of its age.

Re: Hindi Greetings & Basics

Posted: 2013-08-23, 11:40
by suneethhyd
1 ) गौतम बुद्ध - Gautama Buddha
2 ) धर्म - Dharma - Faith, Virtue
3 ) योग - Yoga - Meditation
4 ) कर्म - Karma - Destiny, Action
5 ) महाभारत - Mahabharata - Epic mythological battle
6 ) कृष्ण - Krishna - Hindu deity
7 ) शिव - Shiva - Hindu deity
8 ) मंत्र - Mantra - Chant
9 ) आयुर्वेद - Ayurveda - Traditional Indian medicine.
10 ) महाराष्ट्र - Maharashtra - One of India's largest states.

Jai Hind......

Re: Hindi Greetings & Basics

Posted: 2016-06-01, 1:57
by jimmymax37
Is it appropriate for me to say, dhanyavāda Guru? I have a friend that lives in Kannada and I want to properly thank him for his help. Thank You

Re: Hindi Greetings & Basics

Posted: 2016-06-01, 2:18
by jimmymax37
Is it appropriate for me to say, dhanyavāda Guru? I have a friend that lives in Kannada and I want to properly thank him for his help. Thank You

Re: Hindi Greetings & Basics

Posted: 2016-06-02, 15:03
by Meera
jimmymax37 wrote:Is it appropriate for me to say, dhanyavāda Guru? I have a friend that lives in Kannada and I want to properly thank him for his help. Thank You


You might want to ask this question in the South Asian forum since Kannada is quite different from Hindi:

viewforum.php?f=130

Re: Hindi Greetings & Basics

Posted: 2019-01-18, 20:14
by Paulz
PDK wrote:Hallo i want to know how is the translation of the sentence to Hindi:
I do not live,i burn


"Main jeeta nahi, jalta hung."
That's the closest I can come up with, hope that helps.

Re: Hindi Greetings & Basics

Posted: 2019-01-19, 19:38
by Forever Knowledge
Paulz wrote:
PDK wrote:Hallo i want to know how is the translation of the sentence to Hindi:
I do not live,i burn


"Main jeeta nahi, jalta hung."
That's the closest I can come up with, hope that helps.


Good suggestion, but using Hindi spelling might be more helpful: मैं जीता नहीं, जलता हूँ।

Re: Hindi Greetings & Basics

Posted: 2019-06-07, 12:42
by vikrantrao
I studied sanskrit for 5 years in my matriculation but now no idea about it! Great to find a thread related to this.

Re: Hindi Greetings & Basics

Posted: 2019-06-07, 14:56
by linguoboy
vikrantrao wrote:I studied sanskrit for 5 years in my matriculation but now no idea about it! Great to find a thread related to this.

This is a thread about Hindi, not Sanskrit.

Re: Hindi Greetings & Basics

Posted: 2020-03-29, 9:17
by vijayjohn
mōdgethanc wrote:
Meera wrote:These words are still used in Hindi though.
Of course they are, but the reason they're written with the -a at the end is probably because that's how they were pronounced in Sanskrit.

I don't think that's quite true, but they are indeed pronounced that way in some Indian languages. They may also have been pronounced that way in some of the Prakrits (Pali comes to mind for me).

Re: Hindi Greetings & Basics

Posted: 2020-04-14, 22:03
by umairaasem
Why is Om in Hindi written like this ---> ॐ
And not like this --> ओम

Re: Hindi Greetings & Basics

Posted: 2020-04-15, 0:56
by linguoboy
umairaasem wrote:Why is Om in Hindi written like this ---> ॐ
And not like this --> ओम

A short answer is that this is a syllable with special spiritual significance. It's not unusual in these cases for a peculiar written form to develop. (Compare the ☧ in Christianity.)

A longer answer is that Devanagari is filled with ligatures, which are combinations of multiple letters into a single written symbol. You can see a whole host of them here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devanagari_conjuncts.

When you compare the other examples, suddenly a character which combines the vowel ओ with the candrabindu into a single unified form doesn't seem that exceptional.