Oo and ee

Moderator: Aurinĭa

qwert
Posts: 26
Joined: 2011-05-11, 12:50
Gender: male
Country: IL Israel (ישראל / إسرائيل)

Re: Oo and ee

Postby qwert » 2011-12-22, 20:42

Chekhov wrote:Apparently these sounds are /oə/ and /eə/ in IPA, so they're more like the English diphthongs in bear and poor than the ee and oo in Dutch. (Some people still pronounce the diphthong of poor more like /uə/, but these days it's becoming rarer. A better example might be poet.)

Yep. I don't know IPA but Afrikans 'ee' sounds a bit like the name 'Ian' in English rather than the Dutch 'ee'.
Shiba wrote:Very interesting. :)
Afrikaners also come from France, though; we probably have quite a bit of French grammar worked into Afrikaans.

Well actually I learned French at school and Afrikaans at home (am half SA + off the internet), and as far as I can tell there isn't much in common, apart from the double negation which exists also in French (i.e "ne XXX pas"). Maybe just some South African surnames with "de / du" :)

BTW, I find Afrikaans grammar pretty close to German, but obviously much simpler.
Shiba wrote:Hmm... I may need to upload an mp3 sometime.

Would like to hear a native. It could also be interesting to know what a native Afrikaans thinks about my Afrikaans accent as an Israeli (though my english does sound very SA).
Native: Image Image
Intermediate: Image Image
Beginner: Image

User avatar
Shiba
Posts: 294
Joined: 2010-05-20, 12:06
Gender: female
Country: ZA South Africa (Suid-Afrika / uMzantsi Afrika / South Africa)
Contact:

Re: Oo and ee

Postby Shiba » 2011-12-23, 15:34

qwert wrote:
Chekhov wrote:Apparently these sounds are /oə/ and /eə/ in IPA, so they're more like the English diphthongs in bear and poor than the ee and oo in Dutch. (Some people still pronounce the diphthong of poor more like /uə/, but these days it's becoming rarer. A better example might be poet.)

Yep. I don't know IPA but Afrikans 'ee' sounds a bit like the name 'Ian' in English rather than the Dutch 'ee'.


I'm actually not sure what the Dutch 'ee' sounds like. >.>

qwert wrote:
Shiba wrote:Very interesting. :)
Afrikaners also come from France, though; we probably have quite a bit of French grammar worked into Afrikaans.

Well actually I learned French at school and Afrikaans at home (am half SA + off the internet), and as far as I can tell there isn't much in common, apart from the double negation which exists also in French (i.e "ne XXX pas"). Maybe just some South African surnames with "de / du" :)


Ah, okay. :) Yeah, we have a TON of French names and surnames here. Although we do that thing where "the department of informatics", for example, becomes "die departement informatika", dropping the "of" (or the "van"). My brother said he thinks that comes from French. Also, I've heard that Afrikaans apparently sounds like French from a distance, so while there aren't any specifically French sounds in Afrikaans, I guess we got something from them anyway.

There was actually a project a while ago, AfriFrans, where they took Afrikaans songs and translated them into French. That went really well (so well, in fact, that there's now an AfriSpaans and an AfriItaliaans, too).

qwert wrote:BTW, I find Afrikaans grammar pretty close to German, but obviously much simpler.


Yeah, German is the language the grammar of which is the closest to Afrikaans, of all the languages I know a little of. :) Afrikaans is actually trickier in some ways, though, because there are usually several different ways in which you can jumble the words in a sentence without its being grammatically wrong... making it harder to know when you are wrong.

qwert wrote:
Shiba wrote:Hmm... I may need to upload an mp3 sometime.

Would like to hear a native. It could also be interesting to know what a native Afrikaans thinks about my Afrikaans accent as an Israeli (though my english does sound very SA).


Interesting!
Maybe we should start a thread for voice files.
Native: Afrikaans (af) English (en) || Intermediate: German (de) || Beginner: Some odd combination of Riksmål and Bokmål and whatever (no) || Learning on-and-off: Russian (ru) || Curious: Breton (br) Welsh (cy) Finnish (fi)
Korrigere feilene mine, vær så snill!

Die HERE is my herder; niks sal my ontbreek nie. ~ Psalm 23:1

User avatar
Etxebunti
Posts: 32
Joined: 2012-02-16, 21:29
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Re: Oo and ee

Postby Etxebunti » 2012-03-02, 18:38

Shiba wrote: Although we do that thing where "the department of informatics", for example, becomes "die departement informatika", dropping the "of" (or the "van"). My brother said he thinks that comes from French.



I think your brother is right we do that thing in French : Le département d'informatique => Le département informatique, service d'hygiène et sécurité=>service hygiène et sécurité...

Some Afrikaans names have French roots also:
Le Clerq=>De Klerk
De villiers
...
and some surnames : Pierre, François...

During the world cup there was a broadcast about a city called Franschoek (not sure about the spelling) where lots of French immigrants settled. iirc some farms there still bear French names.

Regarding grammar I think its different but for me the advantage of Afrikaans is that the use of verbs seems to be waaaaaaaaaay simpler :
Je suis / ek is
Tu es / Jy is
Il,elle est / hy, sy, dit is
nous sommes / ons is
Vous êtes / julle is
ils,elles sont / hulle is


Its a bit off topic, sorry about that :D

Etxebunti
Please correct my Afrikaans, dankie!

native[flag]fr[/flag] ; good [flag]en[/flag] ; beginner [flag]eu[/flag] & [flag]es[/flag]; really interested in [flag]af[/flag] ; : forgotten [flag]de[/flag]

User avatar
Shiba
Posts: 294
Joined: 2010-05-20, 12:06
Gender: female
Country: ZA South Africa (Suid-Afrika / uMzantsi Afrika / South Africa)
Contact:

Re: Oo and ee

Postby Shiba » 2012-03-10, 21:47

Etxebunti wrote:
Shiba wrote: Although we do that thing where "the department of informatics", for example, becomes "die departement informatika", dropping the "of" (or the "van"). My brother said he thinks that comes from French.



I think your brother is right we do that thing in French : Le département d'informatique => Le département informatique, service d'hygiène et sécurité=>service hygiène et sécurité...


Aha, I'm glad to hear that. :)


Etxebunti wrote:Some Afrikaans names have French roots also:
Le Clerq=>De Klerk
De villiers
...
and some surnames : Pierre, François...

That's true (the surnames and names are the other way around, though - Pierre and François are names and De Klerk, De Villiers etc. are surnames) - names like "André le Roux" and "Pierre du Toit" are very common, although we pronounce them a bit differently.
It was actually quite funny, a while ago I saw an interview on TV between a British interviewer and a famous South African ex-Rugby player, François Pienaar. The interviewer tried to pronounce the name in the French way, but he couldn't quite figure out how to pronouce "Pienaar" in a French way, so he kept on saying "FRANÇOIS ... Pienah." :lol:

(I'm not sure what language "Pienaar" is from, though - it could actually be French, for all I know, although the "-aar" looks more Dutch.)

Etxebunti wrote:During the world cup there was a broadcast about a city called Franschoek (not sure about the spelling) where lots of French immigrants settled. iirc some farms there still bear French names.

That's exactly how you spell Franschoek. :) There probably are still a lot of farms bearing French names - there are many still bearing their original names in other languages as well.

Etxebunti wrote:Regarding grammar I think its different but for me the advantage of Afrikaans is that the use of verbs seems to be waaaaaaaaaay simpler :
Je suis / ek is
Tu es / Jy is
Il,elle est / hy, sy, dit is
nous sommes / ons is
Vous êtes / julle is
ils,elles sont / hulle is


Its a bit off topic, sorry about that :D


The grammar is different in general; I'm pretty sure Afrikaans grammar is closer to Dutch grammar than anything else (but also a lot simpler).

And no problem about the topic, I don't stay on topic all the time either. :)
I suppose it would be better if a moderator could split the topic, but it's not as if this forum is incredibly active anyway.
Native: Afrikaans (af) English (en) || Intermediate: German (de) || Beginner: Some odd combination of Riksmål and Bokmål and whatever (no) || Learning on-and-off: Russian (ru) || Curious: Breton (br) Welsh (cy) Finnish (fi)
Korrigere feilene mine, vær så snill!

Die HERE is my herder; niks sal my ontbreek nie. ~ Psalm 23:1

User avatar
Etxebunti
Posts: 32
Joined: 2012-02-16, 21:29
Gender: male
Country: FR France (France)

Re: Oo and ee

Postby Etxebunti » 2012-03-11, 21:05

Shiba wrote:the surnames and names are the other way around

oops!

Shiba wrote:I'm not sure what language "Pienaar" is from, though - it could actually be French, for all I know, although the "-aar" looks more Dutch.

It seems "Pienaar" comes from "Pinard" a french surname (that also means wine in slang french)

Etxebunti
Please correct my Afrikaans, dankie!

native[flag]fr[/flag] ; good [flag]en[/flag] ; beginner [flag]eu[/flag] & [flag]es[/flag]; really interested in [flag]af[/flag] ; : forgotten [flag]de[/flag]

User avatar
Shiba
Posts: 294
Joined: 2010-05-20, 12:06
Gender: female
Country: ZA South Africa (Suid-Afrika / uMzantsi Afrika / South Africa)
Contact:

Re: Oo and ee

Postby Shiba » 2012-03-12, 20:16

Ah, cool. :) Thanks! ^^
Native: Afrikaans (af) English (en) || Intermediate: German (de) || Beginner: Some odd combination of Riksmål and Bokmål and whatever (no) || Learning on-and-off: Russian (ru) || Curious: Breton (br) Welsh (cy) Finnish (fi)
Korrigere feilene mine, vær så snill!

Die HERE is my herder; niks sal my ontbreek nie. ~ Psalm 23:1


Return to “Afrikaans”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron