Holidays in Stockholm

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Hoogstwaarschijnlijk
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-09-08, 7:39

Grytolle wrote:
Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:
Grytolle wrote:I assumed all Dutch people had to learn it passively a bit in school, just like we do with Norwegian and Danish :P

Oh, you're online, I was still changing my post (I never use this preview option...).

Ah, so it's not part of the normal Dutch curriculum then :)

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:Oh, but that's interesting. How does that work, how do you passively learn Norwegian or Danish? I guess Dutch children mostly passively learn English because that's used on television and on the Internet a lot, but Afrikaans...? South-Africa is also much farther away than Danmark & Norway. And I think the differences are also bigger but I'm not so sure about that, actually.

Yeah Afrikaans is probably a bit more different. As I recall, I had to read some texts and listen to tape, and then we talked a bit about the differences. It wasn't a major part of my education at all, just barely enough to get a fair idea of what it sounds like :)


Ah, that reminds me of what we did with American English and British English :)

I got used to all your 'hej'-ing, I said 'hej' to my neighbour who said very friendly 'goedemorgen' and that felt just wrong :P
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Dingbats » 2012-09-08, 8:26

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:I got used to all your 'hej'-ing, I said 'hej' to my neighbour who said very friendly 'goedemorgen' and that felt just wrong :P

Incidentally, "godmorgon" is still common in Sweden, unlike "god förmiddag", "god kväll" and so on. ("God natt" is used too, but that's like English "good night".)

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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-09-08, 8:33

Dingbats wrote:
Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:I got used to all your 'hej'-ing, I said 'hej' to my neighbour who said very friendly 'goedemorgen' and that felt just wrong :P

Incidentally, "godmorgon" is still common in Sweden, unlike "god förmiddag", "god kväll" and so on. ("God natt" is used too, but that's like English "good night".)


Oh, okay :) Yes, I think in Dutch it's mostly 'goedemorgen' and 'goededag' (formal situations, that is). 'Goedemiddag' and 'goedenavond' (damn, I even had to look up how to write that...) aren't used that much and 'goedenacht' (good night) has never been used in that sense. We say 'welterusten' and wondered if in Swedish you only have the 'god natt'-thing or also something like that (more like: sleep well)?
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Dingbats » 2012-09-08, 10:04

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:We say 'welterusten' and wondered if in Swedish you only have the 'god natt'-thing or also something like that (more like: sleep well)?

There is also "sov gott" (sleep well), but "god natt" is more common. Sometimes you say both, "god natt, sov gott".

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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Reinder » 2012-09-08, 10:11

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:Oh, okay :) Yes, I think in Dutch it's mostly 'goedemorgen' and 'goededag' (formal situations, that is). 'Goedemiddag' and 'goedenavond' (damn, I even had to look up how to write that...) aren't used that much and 'goedenacht' (good night) has never been used in that sense. We say 'welterusten' and wondered if in Swedish you only have the 'god natt'-thing or also something like that (more like: sleep well)?
We rarely use "goedendag" in formal situations in here. Instead we use "goedemiddag" or "goedenavond". I can't compare it to Frisian, because Frisian formal situations don't exist. :lol:
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-09-08, 10:16

Dingbats wrote:
Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:We say 'welterusten' and wondered if in Swedish you only have the 'god natt'-thing or also something like that (more like: sleep well)?

There is also "sov gott" (sleep well), but "god natt" is more common. Sometimes you say both, "god natt, sov gott".

Ah, okay :) Hm, I'm starting to appreciate our 'welterusten' more.

@Reinder: Yeah, I guess you're right.
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Grytolle » 2012-09-08, 11:40

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:
Dingbats wrote:
Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:I got used to all your 'hej'-ing, I said 'hej' to my neighbour who said very friendly 'goedemorgen' and that felt just wrong :P

Incidentally, "godmorgon" is still common in Sweden, unlike "god förmiddag", "god kväll" and so on. ("God natt" is used too, but that's like English "good night".)


Oh, okay :) Yes, I think in Dutch it's mostly 'goedemorgen' and 'goededag' (formal situations, that is). 'Goedemiddag' and 'goedenavond' (damn, I even had to look up how to write that...) aren't used that much and 'goedenacht' (good night) has never been used in that sense. We say 'welterusten' and wondered if in Swedish you only have the 'god natt'-thing or also something like that (more like: sleep well)?


Reinder wrote:
Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:Oh, okay :) Yes, I think in Dutch it's mostly 'goedemorgen' and 'goededag' (formal situations, that is). 'Goedemiddag' and 'goedenavond' (damn, I even had to look up how to write that...) aren't used that much and 'goedenacht' (good night) has never been used in that sense. We say 'welterusten' and wondered if in Swedish you only have the 'god natt'-thing or also something like that (more like: sleep well)?
We rarely use "goedendag" in formal situations in here. Instead we use "goedemiddag" or "goedenavond". I can't compare it to Frisian, because Frisian formal situations don't exist. :lol:



Interesting!! Over here all of them are used, with the addition of an occasional "goedenamiddag". The spelling corresponds perfectly with how people pronounce them (except in when they try really hard to speak their best Dutch, in which case they paradoxically mimick the more informal Dutch pronunciation) here by the way: goedemorgen, goedendag, goedemiddag, goedenamiddag, goedenavond, (goedenacht). (I wouldn't dare to venture a guess as to if the pronunciation with d or j is more common :nope: )

As for Swedish, we do indeed use "god morgon" quite often, whereas the other ones can basically only be used for a comedic effect, with the exception of "god natt" which serves another function entirely (it is a synonyme of "hej då", not of "hej") :D

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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-09-08, 12:02

Grytolle wrote:hej då


I was wondering if you know hej då and houdoe have anything in common or that it's just a co-incidence that these greetings are so alike?
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Dingbats » 2012-09-08, 14:17

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:I was wondering if you know hej då and houdoe have anything in common or that it's just a co-incidence that these greetings are so alike?

What's the morpheme-by-morpheme breakdown of houdoe? in hej då is an adverb meaning 'then' and related things.

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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Weerwolf » 2012-09-08, 14:36

Dingbats wrote:
Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:I was wondering if you know hej då and houdoe have anything in common or that it's just a co-incidence that these greetings are so alike?

What's the morpheme-by-morpheme breakdown of houdoe? in hej då is an adverb meaning 'then' and related things.

It's a sheer coincidence that the two phrases bear some resemblance. Houdoe is namely derived from "Houd oe eige goed" meaning "take care" or "take care of yourself" in the Brabantic dialect.
I also think it is pronouced without the h sound, since the h-deleting is present in the (most) Brabantic dialects.
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Grytolle » 2012-09-08, 14:57

Dingbats wrote:
Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:I was wondering if you know hej då and houdoe have anything in common or that it's just a co-incidence that these greetings are so alike?

What's the morpheme-by-morpheme breakdown of houdoe? in hej då is an adverb meaning 'then' and related things.


hou-d-oe

The root of hou(d)en (to hold), followed by the imperative ending -d (spelled -t in archaic Standard Dutch), followed by the enclitic object pronoun "oe" ("u" or "jou" in Standard Dutch). I assume it comes from sentences such as "Houd oe taai" or something like that.

Personally, it always reminded me of "ha det!" :mrgreen:


Edit: Ah, there was another post! So the longer form of it is "Houd oew eigen goe", where "oew eigen" is a reflexive pronoun with the literal meaning "your own", and "goe" means "good".

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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-09-09, 7:27

Weerwolf wrote:
Dingbats wrote:
Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:I was wondering if you know hej då and houdoe have anything in common or that it's just a co-incidence that these greetings are so alike?

What's the morpheme-by-morpheme breakdown of houdoe? in hej då is an adverb meaning 'then' and related things.

It's a sheer coincidence that the two phrases bear some resemblance. Houdoe is namely derived from "Houd oe eige goed" meaning "take care" or "take care of yourself" in the Brabantic dialect.
I also think it is pronouced without the h sound, since the h-deleting is present in the (most) Brabantic dialects.


I knew about the 'houd oe eige goed'-thing, but still I wondered :D

The h is definately pronounced though, at least in Zuidoost-Brabant! :)
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