Holidays in Stockholm

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Hoogstwaarschijnlijk
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Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-08-10, 9:29

Goddag!

I'll be in Stockholm for holidays soon and I was wondering about a few things:
-What's a good supermarket in Sweden? Because when I was in Copenhagen it took us a couple of days to see that there were better supermarkets than the ones we went to (they were expensive & small) and I hope not to make the same mistake again. And please tell me that you don't sell only eight chicken fillets and that it's impossible to buy one chicken fillet and only huge fishes like they do in Danmark...? (Apart from that I loved Danmark)
-What's the best (meaning: cheapest) way to go from the airport Arlanda to Stockholm? Because there's said to be this train that's going very fast, but I assume there are other options who may not go that fast but are way cheaper. Are they available for tourists too? We need to use the metro too, is it difficult to buy tickets for that? Do you need to use machines or can you go to an office window?
- Do you have any kind of consol about the fact that the weather is very nice at the moment in Stockholm but is said to become very bad when we'll arrive? Are there any chances that we won't have rain for our full two weeks?

Thanks in advance, I'm looking forward to visit Sweden. I've been there before when I was very young and thought it was a very nice country! :)
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Allekanger » 2012-08-10, 19:01

Hi! I thought I could help a little and share my wisdom with you.

- Supermarkets... Well, the bigger the cheaper, I guess. The fillets seem to come in eights or so, unfortunately... Might be other sizes too though, I'm not familiar with other stores than the one I regularly go to.

- The express train is a robbery, if you ask me. There are also express buses, which are cheaper. But I think the best way (i.e. the cheapest) is take local bus 853 from Arlanda to Märsta, and then take the commuter train 36 (there's only one from Märsta, but apparently it has a number) from Märsta to Stockholm city. Both the bus and the commuter train are part of the SL traffic network, which also manages the subway and buses in and outside Stockholm, which means that you can travel on the same ticket(s) all over the place. Very convenient I'd say. There are different kinds of tickets (all day, three days etc.), so I think you'll be able to find something that suits you. Pay attention to the different zones though, they might affect the prices of your ticket. But yeah, all of this you'll work out once you're here I'm sure. :)

- Hmm, the weather? I have no idea, but I usually goto yr.no to try to find out. They're usually rather good at predicting the weather. It's a Norwegian site, but it works for Sweden too. It's been quite a rainy summer, so I wouldn't be surprised if that continues. We have, however, had sunshine on the very same day as rainfall on and off for weeks now, so I guess the are chances of sunny weather too!

That's all I've got for now, I think. I hope I answered at least some questions. :)
Last edited by Allekanger on 2012-08-12, 9:48, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-08-12, 8:28

Thanks a lot, especially for the information about the bus and commuter train! :)
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-08-17, 13:10

Apart from the way you described I also found this:
http://www.flygbussarna.se/Tidtabeller__Priser.aspx

Would it also be possible to buy the ticket at the airport over there and not online?
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Grytolle » 2012-08-23, 7:40

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:Apart from the way you described I also found this:
http://www.flygbussarna.se/Tidtabeller__Priser.aspx

Would it also be possible to buy the ticket at the airport over there and not online?

There are automats, I'm quite sure... Atleast there are automats at the two airports around Gothenburg :mrgreen:

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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-09-05, 12:54

Grytolle wrote:
Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:Apart from the way you described I also found this:
http://www.flygbussarna.se/Tidtabeller__Priser.aspx

Would it also be possible to buy the ticket at the airport over there and not online?

There are automats, I'm quite sure... Atleast there are automats at the two airports around Gothenburg :mrgreen:


Yes, we've used them! Flugbyssarna = relaxed! 8-)


My impression of Sweden

- Public traffic is really nice: the T-bana is fantastic, it goes so often! And we were really nearby a station so that was great. And the express bus is nice too, it goes so often as well!
- Stockholm is a very nice city. There is so much to do, Gamla Stan is cute, Skansen is very nice and Nordiska Museet too. We visited Stockholm a few times and the only day it was less fun was because it was raining so much.
- The weather... At one point it rained like 36 hours NON STOP! That was a bit too much... But other days the weather was very nice, sunny, not too warm, not too cold. I think we can't complain too much about the weather.
- The supermarkets... Omg, at first we went to Hemköp or ICA and I bought a simple bread for, like 30 SEK which is maybe even more than 3 euros or so. That was just... shocking. We decided to only eat knäckebrod after that. I guess Swedes don't ever eat bread otherwise they will go bankrupt. Luckily we have found a Lidl in the city and the prices were a bit more friendly there. But still a bread could easily cost 20 SEK. Really, a bread here costs €0,90 or so...
- The Swedes are quite friendly and are speaking good English. They're mostly very willing to help and not to impatient when it takes you a while to figure out the money or something like that.
- The language! I though I liked Swedish. It looks robust, nice and understandable. I still like written Swedish, it wasn't too hard to understand it in the supermarket or advertisements and stuff like that. But spoken Swedish :shock: I hadn't heard it that much before and on the one hand it's like Swedes are constantly singing and on the other hand it's like they're about to cry. And it wasn't understandable AT ALL! Kristineberg for example, sounds like Kristinibarje and Alvik sounds like Olriek. I'd still like to learn Swedish though.

It was a nice holiday :)
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Jurgen Wullenwever » 2012-09-06, 1:04

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:spoken Swedish I hadn't heard it that much before and on the one hand it's like Swedes are constantly singing and on the other hand it's like they're about to cry. And it wasn't understandable AT ALL!

I wonder what you would have thought if if you had heard how we speak around here, 200 km west of Stockholm. Other Swedes consider our pronunciation ridiculous, and make fun of it. (And no one understands what I say.)
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-09-06, 6:47

Jurgen Wullenwever wrote:
Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:spoken Swedish I hadn't heard it that much before and on the one hand it's like Swedes are constantly singing and on the other hand it's like they're about to cry. And it wasn't understandable AT ALL!

I wonder what you would have thought if if you had heard how we speak around here, 200 km west of Stockholm. Other Swedes consider our pronunciation ridiculous, and make fun of it. (And no one understands what I say.)

Maybe another time (if you've got enough public transport there as well...) :)
I doubt if I can hear a difference in Swedish pronunciations though. Maybe only when a dialect doesn't use the pitch accents (I suggest that's where the singing & crying comes from). I mean, (Dutch) people sometimes make fun of my pronunciation but Flemish people don't even hear the difference between Hollandic & Brabantic...

Another thing that occured me in Sweden is that all the mothers seem incredibly young. And there are babies everywhere, it's like women (or men) always take them outside or something, haha. But I've barely seen a mother older than 30. Or maybe Swedes look very young because they are doing sports all the time.
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Johanna » 2012-09-06, 18:06

In Stockholm I think the average age for becoming a mother for the first time actually is 30, or very close to it anyway, so I guess we look young, or at least they do there 8-)

Bread is expensive, that's true, and the prices in Stockholm are usually a bit higher than elsewhere in Sweden for most stuff, but especially when it comes to food it seems. I usually make my own bread because of it, even if the prices are a bit lower here, or see if the bakeries have any they sell cheaper because the size got wrong or something.

The pitch accent itself differ from region to region, so even though I guess it sounds like we're all singing, I'm not so sure about the crying part :) We however think that it's the ones without pitch accent, or those with a pitch accent we can't really hear, who sing when they speak. Like Standard Finland Swedish, which lacks it :P

Our long a is /ɑː/ in most of the country, which I guess can sound like an "international" o in the ears of others, especially since it tends to be like half-rounded, bordering on an actual [ɒː]. But I don't think that people who have tried to learn Swedish for real usually find it that difficult, it's mostly those who only have learnt some and/or try to understand it passively without really learning to speak it.

The Kristine- sounding like Kristini- thing sounds very Stockholmish to my ears, or at least Svealandic, but that berg would sound like barje sounds weird... I thought their short e's were usually [e], and also their short ä's, not [æ], which I guess you'd hear as an /a/. And that last e shouldn't be there at all :? It is however a rule in Swedish that -rg becomes /rj/, same goes for -lg becoming /lj/, and they stay that way also when you add a suffix.

I doubt you would have liked the public transport here as much :P It gets worse and worse the smaller the city or town, on the other hand, if it's small enough, you can usually walk anyway :)
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Dingbats » 2012-09-06, 18:29

Johanna wrote:The Kristine- sounding like Kristini- thing sounds very Stockholmish to my ears, or at least Svealandic, but that berg would sound like barje sounds weird... I thought their short e's were usually [e], and also their short ä's, not [æ], which I guess you'd hear as an /a/.

e before r... Berg is indeed [bærj] (can't bother with proper IPA for the r, which varies anyway).

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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Johanna » 2012-09-06, 18:33

Meh, forgot that, and it's such a basic thing... :oops:

*wonders where she left her brain*
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Grytolle » 2012-09-07, 6:40

sorry :oops:

* gives it back *

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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-09-07, 8:17

Johanna wrote:In Stockholm I think the average age for becoming a mother for the first time actually is 30, or very close to it anyway, so I guess we look young, or at least they do there 8-)

Our long a is /ɑː/ in most of the country, which I guess can sound like an "international" o in the ears of others, especially since it tends to be like half-rounded, bordering on an actual [ɒː]. But I don't think that people who have tried to learn Swedish for real usually find it that difficult, it's mostly those who only have learnt some and/or try to understand it passively without really learning to speak it.

The Kristine- sounding like Kristini- thing sounds very Stockholmish to my ears, or at least Svealandic, but that berg would sound like barje sounds weird... I thought their short e's were usually [e], and also their short ä's, not [æ], which I guess you'd hear as an /a/. And that last e shouldn't be there at all :? It is however a rule in Swedish that -rg becomes /rj/, same goes for -lg becoming /lj/, and they stay that way also when you add a suffix.

I doubt you would have liked the public transport here as much :P It gets worse and worse the smaller the city or town, on the other hand, if it's small enough, you can usually walk anyway :)


About the age: maybe the mothers who use the metro tend to be the younger ones? I think in the Netherlands it's usually the poor people who are using public transport so chances are higher that you'll find the younger people there. And as I've been quite a lot in the T-bana, this may has got something to do with it. Though I also think that you all look very young! Of course there were some elderly people too and they were just like the Dutch ones, pushing me away in supermarkets with only a murmeling 'säkta' :wink:

Your long 'a'... I didn't find that very difficult actually, it's the one I use myself when I don't pay much attention on how I speak, I think it's used in the region where I grew up a lot, but in Dutch it's not considered a very nice vowel :wink: But I didn't succeed in hearing a difference between your a with a round thingy and an o, no.
And hm, seemed like -rje to me, but maybe that's only because I found it difficult to believe that a word would actually ended with a j, haha. So unlikely.

Yes, obviously public transport is best in bigger cities. But I can walk, we walked through whole Stockholm each time we went there because we only knew one Lidl! :wink:
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Dingbats » 2012-09-07, 8:26

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:But I didn't succeed in hearing a difference between your a with a round thingy and an o, no.

Wait a minute. <å> is /oː/ and /ɔ/, <o> is /uː/ and /ʊ/ (or /ɔ/), and <a> is /ɑː/ and /a/. Which of these didn't you hear the difference between?

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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-09-07, 8:32

Dingbats wrote:
Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:But I didn't succeed in hearing a difference between your a with a round thingy and an o, no.

Wait a minute. <å> is /oː/ and /ɔ/, <o> is /uː/ and /ʊ/ (or /ɔ/), and <a> is /ɑː/ and /a/. Which of these didn't you hear the difference between?


I think (but my IPA isn't so good, I can only check with this link http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPA-notati ... _Afrikaans) I just became confused because I assumed <o> could also be an /o:/, but apparently they both can be /ɔ/ so I guess that's why sometimes there isn't a difference?

[edit] It's just that I thought the å would be the difficult one to pronounce because it looks so... Swedish & foreign but apparently it's the 'o' that doesn't sound like a Dutch vowel at all.
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Grytolle » 2012-09-07, 13:06

The å should probably remind you a bit of the Afrikaans vowel though: /oə/! :mrgreen:

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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-09-07, 14:18

Grytolle wrote:The å should probably remind you a bit of the Afrikaans vowel though: /oə/! :mrgreen:


And what exactly makes you think that I've heard Afrikaans more often than Swedish? I've been in Sweden twice but I've never been in my whole life to South-Africa nor have I ever met someone who spoke Afrikaans (to me, I mean. I did have a teacher once who came from Sout-Afrika. She spoke Dutch, though the de/het-thing confused her so most of the time she said 'de boek'. One time she said 'het boekje' and added 'with dimunitives at least you're sure it's 'het''. It was cute.) :P
Last edited by Hoogstwaarschijnlijk on 2012-09-07, 14:20, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Grytolle » 2012-09-07, 14:20

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:
Grytolle wrote:The å should probably remind you a bit of the Afrikaans vowel though: /oə/! :mrgreen:


And what exactly makes you think that I've heard Afrikaans more often than Swedish? I've been in Sweden twice but I've never been in my whole life to South-Africa nor have I ever met someone who spoke Afrikaans :P

I assumed all Dutch people had to learn it passively a bit in school, just like we do with Norwegian and Danish :P

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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Hoogstwaarschijnlijk » 2012-09-07, 14:22

Grytolle wrote:I assumed all Dutch people had to learn it passively a bit in school, just like we do with Norwegian and Danish :P

Oh, you're online, I was still changing my post (I never use this preview option...).

Oh, but that's interesting. How does that work, how do you passively learn Norwegian or Danish? I guess Dutch children mostly passively learn English because that's used on television and on the Internet a lot, but Afrikaans...? South-Africa is also much farther away than Danmark & Norway. And I think the differences are also bigger but I'm not so sure about that, actually.
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Re: Holidays in Stockholm

Postby Grytolle » 2012-09-07, 14:51

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:
Grytolle wrote:I assumed all Dutch people had to learn it passively a bit in school, just like we do with Norwegian and Danish :P

Oh, you're online, I was still changing my post (I never use this preview option...).

Ah, so it's not part of the normal Dutch curriculum then :)

Hoogstwaarschijnlijk wrote:Oh, but that's interesting. How does that work, how do you passively learn Norwegian or Danish? I guess Dutch children mostly passively learn English because that's used on television and on the Internet a lot, but Afrikaans...? South-Africa is also much farther away than Danmark & Norway. And I think the differences are also bigger but I'm not so sure about that, actually.

Yeah Afrikaans is probably a bit more different. As I recall, I had to read some texts and listen to tape, and then we talked a bit about the differences. It wasn't a major part of my education at all, just barely enough to get a fair idea of what it sounds like :)


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