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veliko se je dogajalo ... zgodilo malo

Posted: 2015-01-28, 12:50
by Gavril
Dobro jutro,

Another excerpt from the news article that I quoted from in an earlier thread:
Zanimiva volilna zgodba se je razvijala med prvim in današnjim drugim krogom predsedniških volitev na Hrvaškem. Veliko se je dogajalo, zgodilo pravzaprav bore malo. Sneg, ki je zaznamoval prvi, decembrski krog volitev, in zaradi katerega so nekateri menili, da bo dodobra oklestil število tistih, ki bodo volili, kar pa se ni zgodilo, je tudi danes grozil.


"An interesting story unfolded between the first round and today's round of the Presidential elections in Croatia. Much happened, but[?] in fact hardly anything took place. The snow -- which marked the first round of the elections in December, due to which[?] some people thought that snow[?] would heavily cut down on the number of voters (which, however, did not happen) -- was also a threat today."

Two questions:

1) dogajati se and zgoditi se both mean "to happen" as far as I know. Is the second sentence referring to some subtle difference of meaning between these verbs, or is it just making a pun with synonyms?

2) Is katerega in the third sentence referring to the snow (sneg), or to the previous clause (i.e. to the fact that snow was a feature of the previous election day)?

Najlepša hvala za pomoč

Re: veliko se je dogajalo ... zgodilo malo

Posted: 2015-01-28, 13:59
by Ashucky
Gavril wrote:1) dogajati se and zgoditi se both mean "to happen" as far as I know. Is the second sentence referring to some subtle difference of meaning between these verbs, or is it just making a pun with synonyms?
The difference is in the aspect of the two verbs: dogajati se is imperfective, zgoditi se is perfective. That part would be better translated as: "A lot was going on, but hardly anything happened."

Gavril wrote:2) Is katerega in the third sentence referring to the snow (sneg), or to the previous clause (i.e. to the fact that snow was a feature of the previous election day)?
It refers back to the snow. (The snow - which marked the first round of the elections in December, and which, it was thought, would heavily cut down on the number of potential voters (however, that didn't happen) - threatened/was a threat today again.)

Re: veliko se je dogajalo ... zgodilo malo

Posted: 2015-01-28, 15:01
by Gavril
Ashucky wrote:The difference is in the aspect of the two verbs: dogajati se is imperfective, zgoditi se is perfective. That part would be better translated as: "A lot was going on, but hardly anything happened."


Thanks.

Ashucky wrote: It refers back to the snow. (The snow - which marked the first round of the elections in December, and which, it was thought, would heavily cut down on the number of potential voters (however, that didn't happen) - threatened/was a threat today again.)


Hmm, now this clause doesn't quite make sense to me. :? If I try to translate it into English, with katerega referring to the snow, then I get this:

"The snow -- which marked the first round of the elections in December, and because of which some people thought that it would cut down on the number of people who voted (which, however, didn't happen) -- was a threat today as well."

In other words, the implied meaning seems to be, "because of the snow, people thought that the snow would reduce voter turnout", which doesn't make sense in English, unless there is an implicit difference between the two highlighted phrases. For example,

"Because of the snow that occurred during the December election, people thought that any snow during the January election would reduce voter turnout."

Does this interpretation work in light of the facts?

Hvala še enkrat

Re: veliko se je dogajalo ... zgodilo malo

Posted: 2015-01-28, 15:17
by Ashucky
Gavril wrote:"Because of the snow that occurred during the December election, people thought that any snow during the January election would reduce voter turnout."

Does this interpretation work in light of the facts?
That would be the implied meaning, yes. It implies that the same thing people thought would have happened in December, could now also happen in January.

The shedload of clauses in the original sentence is confusing, it'd be easier and simpler to split the whole thing into a couple of more coherent sentences without the crazy cross-referencing between the clauses.

Hope that helps. :)

Re: veliko se je dogajalo ... zgodilo malo

Posted: 2015-01-28, 15:35
by Gavril
Ashucky wrote:That would be the implied meaning, yes. It implies that the same thing people thought would have happened in December, could now also happen in January.


The article mentions that the December round of the election had half a million fewer voters than the second round, so perhaps people had been speculating that the lower turnout in December was due to the snowy conditions. (This article is the only thing I have read about the Croatian elections so far, so I'm just guessing. :))

Hope that helps. :)


It does, thanks

Re: veliko se je dogajalo ... zgodilo malo

Posted: 2015-01-28, 15:47
by Ashucky
Gavril wrote:The article mentions that the December round of the election had half a million fewer voters than the second round, so perhaps people had been speculating that the lower turnout in December was due to the snowy conditions. (This article is the only thing I have read about the Croatian elections so far, so I'm just guessing. :))
Possibly, yeah. I didn't know Croatia had elections until the day it was announced a new president had been elected, so my guess is as good as yours. :D