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Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-06-12, 22:51
by Cesare M.
I am not sure if there is already a thread about this, and I am not studying Turkish at the moment (although I will go back to studying it more often next year), but I was just wondering if any of you who can speak a Turkish dialect, apart from Standard Turkish, can explain in detail in this thread all the important differences from what you know at the moment between your dialect and the standard one.

I am just very curious to know. Thanks.

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-06-13, 21:13
by Ektoras
For the most part, the difference between the Turkish dialects is the pronunciation; not the vocabulary, and so the mutual intelligibility between them is much higher than, say, between the dialects of Italian.

In Ankara and in Central Anatolia, for instance, you will notice that k usually becomes a hard h between vowels, and it's pronounced as a simple g in other instances:
Ankara → Angara
Yaptık → Yaptıh

In the East and Southeast Anatolia (this is also true for some parts of Central Anatolia), the nasal n, which doesn't exist in Standard Turkish, is still alive.
Bana → Baŋa

And the verbal forms are simpler:
Yapıyor musun → Yapıyoŋŋu
Yapmıyorum → yapmaayoŋ (Central Anatolia)

I know that the Aegean region has some special vocabulary for certain things that the rest of Turkey never uses.

I will not speak for other regions, but I'll just add that speaking with a regional accent is often seen as uneducated, which is sad but c'est la vie.

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-06-13, 21:50
by voron
If I made a trip to Diyarbakır I wouldn't probably understand shit:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOqFKFw-5M4
:)

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-06-13, 23:03
by Ektoras
Hehe, apart from a couple of words, it's understandable for a native speaker.
This video reminded me of another feature of the eastern regions: ğ is pronounced as a normal g.


And it's interesting how he asked the time: "Saat çende?"
I suppose it's from Farsi.

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-06-14, 1:28
by mōdgethanc
Ektoras wrote:This video reminded me of another feature of the eastern regions: ğ is pronounced as a normal g.
Is there anywhere it's pronounced like in Azeri (ie. Greek gamma) and not just silent?
And it's interesting how he asked the time: "Saat çende?"
I suppose it's from Farsi.
Well, the word "saat" is from Arabic, but I thought standard Turkish used it too.

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-06-14, 6:54
by Limagne
And it's interesting how he asked the time: "Saat çende?"
I suppose it's from Farsi.


Sounds more like Kurdish to me (seet çend e in Kurmanji).

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-06-14, 6:56
by Limagne
Sorry,double post.

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-06-14, 7:46
by kalemiye
Ektoras wrote:
And the verbal forms are simpler:
Yapıyor musun → Yapıyoŋŋu
Yapmıyorum → yapmaayoŋ (Central Anatolia)


Yapiyorum -> yapiom
Yapiyorsun -> yapion
Ne yapiyorsun -> nabion
Ne yapacaksin -> Naabacan

And so on :lol:
----------
In the East there are some special features:

In Erzurums region and some others instead of using the suffix, "-e/alim", "-ak/-ek" is used. I.e: , instead of gidelim, gidek is used.

Also, "ile" is pronounced as "nen", "arkadasinan", "paraynan".

Eastern dialects are in general somewhere between Azerbaijani Turkish and Istanbul Turkish, but because of the education system and the fact that Istanbul Turkish is the dialect of prestige, the local dialects are now spoken mostly by old people and the uneducated youth.

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-06-14, 7:50
by kalemiye
"Pontic Greek and Trabzon Turkish

Dialects are formed by complex historical processes that involve cultural exchange, migration, and organic transformation. Thus, the study of dialects can provide information about the history of a particular language as well as the communities that have historically spoken that given language. In this episode, Bernt Brendemoen discusses the emergence of the Turkish dialect of the Black Sea region, its relationship with early Anatolian and Ottoman Turkish as well as Pontic Greek, and what it can tell us about the evolution of the modern Turkish language."

http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/11/history-turkish-language-dialects-turkic-greek-influence.html

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-06-14, 7:51
by kalemiye
voron wrote:If I made a trip to Diyarbakır I wouldn't probably understand shit:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOqFKFw-5M4
:)


The Turkish spoken in Kurdish-speaking regions tends to be really awful, but it is not difficult to understand once you get used to the accent. Also, the way they speak tends to be closer to Azerbaijani Turkish too. If you pay attention, they say "nerelisen" (haralisan in Az), "gidesen", etc.

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-06-14, 9:16
by Hoogstwaarschijnlijk
mōdgethanc wrote:
Ektoras wrote:This video reminded me of another feature of the eastern regions: ğ is pronounced as a normal g.
Is there anywhere it's pronounced like in Azeri (ie. Greek gamma) and not just silent?
And it's interesting how he asked the time: "Saat çende?"
I suppose it's from Farsi.
Well, the word "saat" is from Arabic, but I thought standard Turkish used it too.

I think it's the 'çende' that's different.

kalemiye wrote:Yapiyorum -> yapiom
Yapiyorsun -> yapion
Ne yapiyorsun -> nabion
Ne yapacaksin -> Naabacan


:|

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-06-14, 10:21
by kalemiye
Well, the word "saat" is from Arabic, but I thought standard Turkish used it too.


Yes, the word saat is the word used for hour in Turkish (dialectal or standard).

saat çande? = what time is it? (in Kurmanci and Persian)

In Turkish = Saat kaç?

çand = kaç
e = -dir

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-06-14, 20:18
by Ektoras
mōdgethanc wrote:Is there anywhere it's pronounced like in Azeri (ie. Greek gamma) and not just silent?

It's mainly in Eastern Turkey that we find that sound.
If you mean in other countries, other Turkic languages such as Kazakh might have a sonorous ğ, but I honestly don't know.

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-07-20, 23:44
by paralonta
In some Yörük/Manav dialects

yapıyorum - yapıyon*
yapıyorsun - yapıyoɲ
yapıyor - yapıyo
yapıyoruz - yapıyoz
yapıyorsunuz - yapıyoɲuz
yapıyorlar - yapıyolaa (aa: long a)

* Yes, it is yapıyon for 1st person. Also, in turkmen language, the suffix for 1st person is -n.

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-07-25, 4:32
by vijayjohn
Ektoras wrote:
mōdgethanc wrote:Is there anywhere it's pronounced like in Azeri (ie. Greek gamma) and not just silent?

It's mainly in Eastern Turkey that we find that sound.
If you mean in other countries, other Turkic languages such as Kazakh might have a sonorous ğ, but I honestly don't know.

Yes, in Eastern Turkey, some varieties have gamma, not [g], for ğ.

And yes, some other Turkic languages (such as Kazakh and Kyrgyz) also have gamma.

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-08-16, 8:32
by Türkmeni söýýän
Ektoras wrote:For the most part, the difference between the Turkish dialects is the pronunciation; not the vocabulary, and so the mutual intelligibility between them is much higher than, say, between the dialects of Italian....


Then wouldn't that make them mere accents rather than different dialects?

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-08-16, 10:43
by Ektoras
That's true, I guess. Though the differences are not only at a phonetic level; there are words that they use that are unknown to the rest of the country. Though I don't have an example of that right now.
Anyways, 'accent' might indeed be a more correct way to call them.

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2013-09-18, 12:56
by Domi333
Would the dialects have anything to do with a nasal pronunciation of a French word borrowed into Turkish (musicien) müzisyen, the last syllable was pronounced nasally surprisingly enough!

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2014-02-15, 11:42
by Multiturquoise
There is a list of words that are used in Seben (Bolu), which is my hometown... You can check this! ;)

http://www.mamatli.8m.com/sebence.html

Re: Turkish Dialects

Posted: 2014-02-15, 12:52
by md0
From what I understand, Cypriot Turkish was suppressed by the Turkish Cypriot education system, and it's probably nowadays mostly replaced with "Standard Turkish with a Cypriot Accent". I'm too early in my study of the language to tell.

Bibliography mentions that one of the main characteristics of Cypriot Turkish is keeping the -ŋ sounds in words that had it in proto-Turkish.

I could also find some glossaries of Turkish Cypriot, showing obviously a greater amount of Greek and English loanwords, compared to the tendency to use French loanwords in standard Turkish (similarly in Cypriot Greek: English over French, Turkish over Slavic/Romanian, unlike standard Greek).
http://www.cypnet.co.uk/ncyprus/people/ ... guage.html
http://kypros.org/Cyprus/words.txt

One I find particularly amusing:

CyTurk StdTurk
Gusbo Kazma


CyGreek StdGreek
kúspos kasmás