Kısa sorular / Short Questions

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-09-24, 6:11

Michael wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:Is çiğ pirinç yerdim really the way to say 'I used to eat raw rice' in Turkish? Why yerdim and not yedim?

Just venturing a guess here: Yer- here seems to be a contraction of the verb root ye- with the imperfective-aspect affix -Ar-.

I mean, that's surely what happens in yer, and I did think of that possibility, but I don't recall ever hearing of that happening in Turkish for the past tense before.

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby Michael » 2017-09-24, 7:05

vijayjohn wrote:
Michael wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:Is çiğ pirinç yerdim really the way to say 'I used to eat raw rice' in Turkish? Why yerdim and not yedim?

Just venturing a guess here: Yer- here seems to be a contraction of the verb root ye- with the imperfective-aspect affix -Ar-.

I mean, that's surely what happens in yer, and I did think of that possibility, but I don't recall ever hearing of that happening in Turkish for the past tense before.

Well, without the imperfective-aspect suffix, the phrase would simply mean "I ate raw rice".
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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-09-24, 7:34

I know. That's pretty much all I meant in that context anyway, though...so idk why Elaine considered yedim there to be wrong.

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby voron » 2017-09-24, 10:27

vijayjohn wrote:I know. That's pretty much all I meant in that context anyway, though...so idk why Elaine considered yedim there to be wrong.

The imperfective is needed because you used "bazen".
Ottherwise it would mean you ate once.
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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-09-24, 21:04

Ohh, OK, that makes sense! Thanks!

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-01-29, 4:35

At 1:06 and 1:40 in this song (which I've posted before, so sorry if you don't like this song, especially if you've already heard it :P), the singer pronounces the word mağrip something like [məgɨɾɪːːp]. Does anyone know why the ğ there is pronounced like a g? Could it be dialect variation or just a mistake?

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-02-08, 5:06

There is a song from Spain sung in Ladino which contains a word, "biliuzar," and the notes to the song claim that this is a Turkish word meaning "beautiful" or "handsome." The notes also say that in this case it refers to a young man. Is there any word similar to this in Turkish, with this sort of meaning?
When I first heard the song, at first I assumed that "biliuzar" was a type of tree, based on the context (below). So is there any word like "biliuzar" or "biliyuzar" in Turkish... meaning "beautiful," "handsome" or "young man" (or even some type of tree)? I can't find anything like it in dictionaries. (Presumably the spelling has been altered, and probably the pronunciation as well; at this point I'm just wondering if the notes about it being from a Turkish word are even correct.)
Teşekkürler!

En el djardín de la reyna
Ha kresido un biliuzar.
La raís tiene de oro
La simiente de kristal.

(In the queen's garden
A "biliuzar" has grown.
The roots have gold/are golden,
The seeds are of crystal.)
Video of the song ("biliuzar" at 1:59)

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby Multiturquoise » 2018-03-11, 15:17

Linguaphile wrote:There is a song from Spain sung in Ladino which contains a word, "biliuzar," and the notes to the song claim that this is a Turkish word meaning "beautiful" or "handsome." The notes also say that in this case it refers to a young man. Is there any word similar to this in Turkish, with this sort of meaning?
When I first heard the song, at first I assumed that "biliuzar" was a type of tree, based on the context (below). So is there any word like "biliuzar" or "biliyuzar" in Turkish... meaning "beautiful," "handsome" or "young man" (or even some type of tree)? I can't find anything like it in dictionaries. (Presumably the spelling has been altered, and probably the pronunciation as well; at this point I'm just wondering if the notes about it being from a Turkish word are even correct.)
Teşekkürler!

En el djardín de la reyna
Ha kresido un biliuzar.
La raís tiene de oro
La simiente de kristal.

(In the queen's garden
A "biliuzar" has grown.
The roots have gold/are golden,
The seeds are of crystal.)
Video of the song ("biliuzar" at 1:59)


The nearest word that I could think is "bergüzar". Wiktionary has an entry for the word, and the word is of Persian origin. But I'm not sure if this was the word you were looking for.
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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-03-11, 20:31

Multiturquoise wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:There is a song from Spain sung in Ladino which contains a word, "biliuzar," and the notes to the song claim that this is a Turkish word meaning "beautiful" or "handsome." The notes also say that in this case it refers to a young man. Is there any word similar to this in Turkish, with this sort of meaning?
When I first heard the song, at first I assumed that "biliuzar" was a type of tree, based on the context (below). So is there any word like "biliuzar" or "biliyuzar" in Turkish... meaning "beautiful," "handsome" or "young man" (or even some type of tree)? I can't find anything like it in dictionaries. (Presumably the spelling has been altered, and probably the pronunciation as well; at this point I'm just wondering if the notes about it being from a Turkish word are even correct.)
Teşekkürler!

En el djardín de la reyna
Ha kresido un biliuzar.
La raís tiene de oro
La simiente de kristal.

(In the queen's garden
A "biliuzar" has grown.
The roots have gold/are golden,
The seeds are of crystal.)
Video of the song ("biliuzar" at 1:59)


The nearest word that I could think is "bergüzar". Wiktionary has an entry for the word, and the word is of Persian origin. But I'm not sure if this was the word you were looking for.
Thank you, Multiturquoise! I'm not sure either, but I hadn't found that one in my search.

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby Saim » 2018-08-26, 12:39

From Glosbe:

1. Yolcuların beyaz çizginin gerisinde durması gerekmektedir.
Travellers must stay behind the white line.

What is the function of -ın in yolcuların in this sentence?

2. Aşağı yukarı zıplamak ve rahatsız edici sesler çıkarmada iyi misiniz?
Are either of you good at jumping up and down and making annoying noises?

Is this sentence grammatically correct?

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby voron » 2018-09-21, 11:34

Saim wrote:From Glosbe:

I can't believe I missed this question. :shock:

1. Yolcuların beyaz çizginin gerisinde durması gerekmektedir.
Travellers must stay behind the white line.

What is the function of -ın in yolcuların in this sentence?

It's the genitive case and a part of izafe: Yolcuların durma - Standing of travellers (behind the white line is required).

2. Aşağı yukarı zıplamak ve rahatsız edici sesler çıkarmada iyi misiniz?
Are either of you good at jumping up and down and making annoying noises?
Is this sentence grammatically correct?

It is. What seems suspicious to you?
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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby Saim » 2018-09-21, 13:33

1. Yolcuların beyaz çizginin gerisinde durması gerekmektedir.
Travellers must stay behind the white line.

What is the function of -ın in yolcuların in this sentence?

It's the genitive case and a part of izafe: Yolcuların durma - Standing of travellers (behind the white line is required).


Thanks! I imagined it was something like this but I wasn't sure, especially since durması is so far away from yolcuların in the sentence!

2. Aşağı yukarı zıplamak ve rahatsız edici sesler çıkarmada iyi misiniz?
Are either of you good at jumping up and down and making annoying noises?
Is this sentence grammatically correct?

It is. What seems suspicious to you?


Looking at this at first I couldn't even remember what problem I had with it, but I guess what confused me is that it's zıplamak rather than zıplamada. Then again, we wouldn't put "at" before both verbs in English either so... :lol: maybe the fact that the order's inversed when compared to English made me think overly "logically".

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby SomehowGeekyPolyglot » 2018-11-10, 11:49

Background: I already am somewhat familiar with one agglutinative language (Swahili, speaking: something like A1 to B1, reading: up to B2 depending on the topic and context). But especially Turkish agglutination can lead to very, very long words sometimes :).
So how exactly to deal with it?

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby voron » 2018-11-10, 14:42

SomehowGeekyPolyglot wrote:Background: I already am somewhat familiar with one agglutinative language (Swahili, speaking: something like A1 to B1, reading: up to B2 depending on the topic and context). But especially Turkish agglutination can lead to very, very long words sometimes :).
So how exactly to deal with it?

After you internalize each suffix, forming long words will come naturally.
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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby SomehowGeekyPolyglot » 2018-11-10, 14:44

voron wrote:
SomehowGeekyPolyglot wrote:Background: I already am somewhat familiar with one agglutinative language (Swahili, speaking: something like A1 to B1, reading: up to B2 depending on the topic and context). But especially Turkish agglutination can lead to very, very long words sometimes :).
So how exactly to deal with it?

After you internalize each suffix, forming long words will come naturally.


Ah... puzzle piece being found :). And yes, after being told that it really can be like this, it is logical to me, too. But it wasn't like this before, otherwise I wouldn't have asked. :)
Maybe I should just, additionally, mention that for some reason I am not aware of, I tend to forget Turkish suffixes/affixes rather easily (and currently I do not have any speaking opportunity either, this is also related to time "issues").

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby chung » 2018-11-11, 1:12

I've run into something in Azeri, but figure that some insight from Turkish might help considering how similar the languages are (I'll post my question as it relates to Azeri in the Turkic subforum, in any case).

As with Azeri, I recall that Turkish has a few verbs that can be translated as "to like". Something tells me that they're not perfect synonyms despite the semantic overlap, and I suspect that there are some elements from pragmatics and/or considerations for style and register that differentiate the variants. A couple trains of thought are
wondering if one verb occur more frequently with infinitives (e.g. "I like to do sg") whereas the others are more often complemented by nominals (e.g. "I like you") or if there's a difference in register that native speakers recognize? (It's as in English when I don't think of "to be fond of" and "to like" as perfect synonyms but there are instances when I could use either one and they give the same meaning without sounding unidiomatic or too strange (e.g. "Chung, how do you feel about your former boss?" - "I liked her" / "I was fond of her").

What are some differences between each of:
1) beğenmek
2) hoşlanmak
3) hoşuna gitmek
4) sevmek

For the record, the Azeri verbs that I'm thinking of are: bəyənmək, xoşlamaq, xoşlanmaq, xoşu gəlmək, xoşuna gəlmək and sevmək
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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby SomehowGeekyPolyglot » 2018-11-12, 8:50

"Bunu gerekirse değiştirebilir miyim?" - "Tabiî ki."

This is a short two-word answer :). Is it both used for formal and informal ways of communication?

"Burada bir yaprak kağıt ve tükenmez var mı?"

"Burada" means both "here" and "in this place/in this quarter".
When it comes to sentences like the example above, it should be rather clear that one only is asking about, for example, the room one currently is in. Not about whether there is even a single sheet of paper in the whole quarter of course :).
But for other sentences, things aren't the same. Sometimes there is a need of explicitly saying "I am only talking about anything very close to me, nothing else". Is there a specific word that can be used for it, or is there a need of additional context or disambiguation through some additional words?

"Beni saat 7.00 de uyandırır mısınız lütfen?"

Because this is a question anyway rather than a command, if one would forget or omit the word lüften, would it sound rude or not?


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