Kısa sorular / Short Questions

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-09-24, 6:11

Michael wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:Is çiğ pirinç yerdim really the way to say 'I used to eat raw rice' in Turkish? Why yerdim and not yedim?

Just venturing a guess here: Yer- here seems to be a contraction of the verb root ye- with the imperfective-aspect affix -Ar-.

I mean, that's surely what happens in yer, and I did think of that possibility, but I don't recall ever hearing of that happening in Turkish for the past tense before.

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby Michael » 2017-09-24, 7:05

vijayjohn wrote:
Michael wrote:
vijayjohn wrote:Is çiğ pirinç yerdim really the way to say 'I used to eat raw rice' in Turkish? Why yerdim and not yedim?

Just venturing a guess here: Yer- here seems to be a contraction of the verb root ye- with the imperfective-aspect affix -Ar-.

I mean, that's surely what happens in yer, and I did think of that possibility, but I don't recall ever hearing of that happening in Turkish for the past tense before.

Well, without the imperfective-aspect suffix, the phrase would simply mean "I ate raw rice".
American English (en-us) Pizzonese (nap) N Italian (it) Mexican Spanish (es-mx) Brazilian Portuguese (pt-br) Albanian (sq) B1 Greek (el) Persian (fa) A2 Romanian (ro) Old English (en_old) Turkish (tr) Azerbaijani (az) A1
„Çdo njeri është peng i veprave të veta.‟
Every human being is hostage to their own deeds.

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-09-24, 7:34

I know. That's pretty much all I meant in that context anyway, though...so idk why Elaine considered yedim there to be wrong.

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby voron » 2017-09-24, 10:27

vijayjohn wrote:I know. That's pretty much all I meant in that context anyway, though...so idk why Elaine considered yedim there to be wrong.

The imperfective is needed because you used "bazen".
Ottherwise it would mean you ate once.

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-09-24, 21:04

Ohh, OK, that makes sense! Thanks!

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-01-29, 4:35

At 1:06 and 1:40 in this song (which I've posted before, so sorry if you don't like this song, especially if you've already heard it :P), the singer pronounces the word mağrip something like [məgɨɾɪːːp]. Does anyone know why the ğ there is pronounced like a g? Could it be dialect variation or just a mistake?

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-02-08, 5:06

There is a song from Spain sung in Ladino which contains a word, "biliuzar," and the notes to the song claim that this is a Turkish word meaning "beautiful" or "handsome." The notes also say that in this case it refers to a young man. Is there any word similar to this in Turkish, with this sort of meaning?
When I first heard the song, at first I assumed that "biliuzar" was a type of tree, based on the context (below). So is there any word like "biliuzar" or "biliyuzar" in Turkish... meaning "beautiful," "handsome" or "young man" (or even some type of tree)? I can't find anything like it in dictionaries. (Presumably the spelling has been altered, and probably the pronunciation as well; at this point I'm just wondering if the notes about it being from a Turkish word are even correct.)
Teşekkürler!

En el djardín de la reyna
Ha kresido un biliuzar.
La raís tiene de oro
La simiente de kristal.

(In the queen's garden
A "biliuzar" has grown.
The roots have gold/are golden,
The seeds are of crystal.)
Video of the song ("biliuzar" at 1:59)

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby Multiturquoise » 2018-03-11, 15:17

Linguaphile wrote:There is a song from Spain sung in Ladino which contains a word, "biliuzar," and the notes to the song claim that this is a Turkish word meaning "beautiful" or "handsome." The notes also say that in this case it refers to a young man. Is there any word similar to this in Turkish, with this sort of meaning?
When I first heard the song, at first I assumed that "biliuzar" was a type of tree, based on the context (below). So is there any word like "biliuzar" or "biliyuzar" in Turkish... meaning "beautiful," "handsome" or "young man" (or even some type of tree)? I can't find anything like it in dictionaries. (Presumably the spelling has been altered, and probably the pronunciation as well; at this point I'm just wondering if the notes about it being from a Turkish word are even correct.)
Teşekkürler!

En el djardín de la reyna
Ha kresido un biliuzar.
La raís tiene de oro
La simiente de kristal.

(In the queen's garden
A "biliuzar" has grown.
The roots have gold/are golden,
The seeds are of crystal.)
Video of the song ("biliuzar" at 1:59)


The nearest word that I could think is "bergüzar". Wiktionary has an entry for the word, and the word is of Persian origin. But I'm not sure if this was the word you were looking for.
(tr) (ka) (tk) (el) (en) (ga)

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby Linguaphile » 2018-03-11, 20:31

Multiturquoise wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:There is a song from Spain sung in Ladino which contains a word, "biliuzar," and the notes to the song claim that this is a Turkish word meaning "beautiful" or "handsome." The notes also say that in this case it refers to a young man. Is there any word similar to this in Turkish, with this sort of meaning?
When I first heard the song, at first I assumed that "biliuzar" was a type of tree, based on the context (below). So is there any word like "biliuzar" or "biliyuzar" in Turkish... meaning "beautiful," "handsome" or "young man" (or even some type of tree)? I can't find anything like it in dictionaries. (Presumably the spelling has been altered, and probably the pronunciation as well; at this point I'm just wondering if the notes about it being from a Turkish word are even correct.)
Teşekkürler!

En el djardín de la reyna
Ha kresido un biliuzar.
La raís tiene de oro
La simiente de kristal.

(In the queen's garden
A "biliuzar" has grown.
The roots have gold/are golden,
The seeds are of crystal.)
Video of the song ("biliuzar" at 1:59)


The nearest word that I could think is "bergüzar". Wiktionary has an entry for the word, and the word is of Persian origin. But I'm not sure if this was the word you were looking for.
Thank you, Multiturquoise! I'm not sure either, but I hadn't found that one in my search.

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Re: Kısa sorular / Short Questions

Postby Saim » 2018-08-26, 12:39

From Glosbe:

1. Yolcuların beyaz çizginin gerisinde durması gerekmektedir.
Travellers must stay behind the white line.

What is the function of -ın in yolcuların in this sentence?

2. Aşağı yukarı zıplamak ve rahatsız edici sesler çıkarmada iyi misiniz?
Are either of you good at jumping up and down and making annoying noises?

Is this sentence grammatically correct?


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