Turkish Study Group

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-10-14, 23:07

Sure! I found two translations into English here.
Saim wrote:Which GLOSS text do you want to do?

Tbh I didn't have one in particular in mind; I just wanted to suggest it as a resource and see where that ended up. But I thought "Turkish appetizers" looked pretty interesting for a start.

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby Saim » 2018-10-15, 17:14

vijayjohn wrote:Tbh I didn't have one in particular in mind; I just wanted to suggest it as a resource and see where that ended up. But I thought "Turkish appetizers" looked pretty interesting for a start.


1

Yemek tariflerinde kullanılan bazı kelimelere aşina olmak için isimleri ve emir kipinde olan fiilleri uygun sütunlara yerleştiriniz.

In order to become familiar with some of the vocabulary used in recipes, place the nouns and the verbs, which are in the imperative mood form, into the appropriate columns.


aşina - familiar (from Persian, whence Urdu آشنا)
emir - order (from Arabic أَمَرَ, يَأْمُرُ‎‎)
kip - form
sütun - column (from Persian, whence Urdu سُتُون; related to a whole bunch of IE words like Germanic stand/stehen/staan, Greek stadium, Latin status, Slavic stado and stajati and Indo-Iranian -stan/-sthan)

salatalık - cucumber
yağ - oil
kabak - zucchini, pumpkin
maydanoz - parsley (my Hungarian-influenced brain found it very different not to put this in the verb category, but I
managed to resist :lol: )
ilave etmek (from Arabic علاوة) = eklemek (from ek - extra) - to add
malzeme - ingredient (from Arabic ما لزم 'what is necessary')
rendelemek - to grate (rende - grater)

2

Her bir yemek tarifinde kullanılan malzemeleri gözden geçirip soruları cevaplayınız. Bu aktiviteye başlamadan önce metrik sistem ve Türk yemek tariflerinde kullanılan diğer ölçü birimleri hakkında bilgi edinmek için Teacher's Note'u okuyunuz. Bu aktivitede üç soru var.

Scan the ingredients of each recipe and answer the questions. Before starting this activity, read the Teacher's Note to learn about the metric system and the other units of measurement used in Turkish recipes. This activity has three questions.


tarif - description (Arabic تعريف)
ölçü - measurement (ölçmek - to measure; ölçüt - criterion)

voron wrote:That's how Turks saw America in 1995 (the year when the song was writen). Would you guys be interested in doing the lyrics?


Let's do it. :) I was going to start today but I should get off the computer if I want to get a good nights sleep. Will get into it tomorrow if I find the time.

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-10-17, 6:30

Oh, I'm sorry! I should have clarified how I was thinking of using GLOSS. :oops: I honestly was just thinking of looking at the source text and getting new vocabulary words out of it. :P

doyurucu - satisfying
serinletici - refreshing
malzeme - ingredient
adet - unit (or I guess measure word for cucumbers?)
boy - stature, size
salatalık - cucumbers (I thought it was pretty interesting that salad seems to be associated with lettuce in French (salade in French can just mean 'lettuce' as well as 'salad') but with cucumbers in Turkish)
su bardağı - cup
diş sarımsak - clove of garlic
tatlı kaşığı - teaspoon
kuru - dry
nane - mint leaves (I only knew this in Arabic until now (which of course is where nane comes from, at least ultimately)! This is also where Serbian gets its own term for 'mint' nana)
çay kaşığı - teaspoon (duh!)
yapılış - procedure, way of being made
yıkamak - to wash
soymak - to peel, skin, undress, strip, rob :D (Rob the cucumbers! :twisted: Strip those suckers of all their cash!!)
derince - deep (here translated as 'large')
kap - bowl
rendelemek - to grate
ezmek - to crush
ilave etmek - to add
karıştırmak - to mix
gezdirmek - to drizzle (in cooking), to (take out for a) walk
yaprak - leaf
süslemek - to garnish, adorn

Also, from the exercises you listed words from, in addition to all the words you listed (some of which I just listed above), I learned:

isim - noun
emir kipi - imperative mood form
uygun - appropriate
yerleştirmek - to place
gözden geçirmek - to scan
birim - unit
bilgi edinmek - to learn

And finally, all the new vocab from "Amerika" for me:

karışmak - to join, get mixed
bulut - cloud
varil - barrel
etraf - surrounding area
sis - fog
duman - smoke (or fog!)
rakçı - rocker (and I guess I also learned rapçi - rapper)
çizme - boot
fötr - felt
kot pantolon - jeans

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby Saim » 2018-10-18, 8:21

But I like reading the exercise instructions. :lol: Honestly the text itself is pretty boring and I'm not at the point where I'd like to look at so much food vocabulary at once. If we're going to do hard texts I'd prefer to go to Wikipedia or the news....

3

Yemek tariflerini okuyup her bir cümlenin doğru veya yanlış olup olmadığına karar veriniz. Bu aktiviteye başlamadan önce, yemek tariflerinde kullanılan fiil formunu öğrenmek için Teacher's Note'u okuyunuz.

Read the recipes and decide whether the following statements are true or false. Before starting this activity, read the Teacher's Note about the verb forms in recipe directions.


yanlış - false

Rafet El Roman - Amerika

bulut - cloud
simsiyah - jet black
macera - adventure
varil - barrel (from Italian barile)
sis - smog
duman - smoke
fötr - fedora (from French feutre)
kot pantolon - jeans (also blucin, from English "blue jeans")

çizme - boot


I'm surprised you haven't learnt this in Serbian already. :)

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-10-21, 6:38

Saim wrote:But I like reading the exercise instructions. :lol:

Oh, don't get me wrong; I didn't mean to criticize you for going through them or anything! What I meant was that I hadn't thought that far ahead and I'm much lazier about using GLOSS, which is why I just try to learn all the vocab I don't already know from even the most basic reading material it offers (as a result of which I get quickly overwhelmed, which is probably what I get for not actually using the material the way it's supposed to be used. :lol: I've had this problem in Levantine Arabic and Kurmanji, too, and a similar problem in Mandarin Chinese). :P
If we're going to do hard texts I'd prefer to go to Wikipedia or the news....

:idea:
çizme - boot


I'm surprised you haven't learnt this in Serbian already. :)

That's probably in large part because I fucking suck at talking about articles of clothing or footwear in any language, including English. :lol: ("Describe the shirt you're wearing!" "It's...blue with vertical...lines that are another shade of blue, I guess...? Oh, and it has a pocket!" Pockets are important).

Also can I just say the music video for "Amerika" managed to remind me that I was kind of astonished that Zagreb has modern highways? Even Germany looks more antiquated to me so far than Croatia does. :shock: But that's probably because I have an extremely limited perspective on what Croatia's like and an even more limited one on what Germany's like.

EDIT: There's nothing new in the directions for that exercise to me that isn't also new to you, so I guess I'll just keep getting vocab out of materials that are kind of useless to you for now :silly:

Ege - Aegean
yenir - it is eaten
kabak - zucchini
un - flour (false friend with Hindi/Urdu!)
civar - neighborhood
civarı - about, approximately
dal - stalk
soğan - onion
demet - bunch
maydanoz - parsley
dereotu - dill
tutam - pinch
pul biber - flaked red pepper
kızartmak - to fry
sıvı - liquid
incecik - finely
doğramak - to chop
çırpmak - to beat (ingredients), scramble
miktar - quantity
tavaya kızdırmak - to heat the oil
karış - handout, donations
tabak - plate, dish
dökmek - to pour (out)

Also Turks use coffee cups as a measurement for cooking? Wtf :shock:

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby Saim » 2018-10-21, 8:39

vijayjohn wrote:civar - neighborhood
civarı - about, approximately


This one came up in the Istanbul textbook, I think:

civarında - in the vicinity/neighbourhood of

miktar - quantity


Arabic, Urdu: مِقدار

tavaya kızdırmak - to heat the oil


I knew kızdırmak in the sense of 'to irritate'. :)

un - flour (false friend with Hindi/Urdu!)
soğan - onion
kızartmak - to fry
sıvı - liquid
doğramak - to chop
tabak - plate, dish
dökmek - to pour (out)


These words are kind of useful, I'll make sentence cards for them.

EDIT:

tavaya kızdırmak - to heat the oil


Btw tava means frying pan (as it does in Croatia; in Serbia it's tiganj, from Greek). Not sure where the oil (yağ) comes into this.

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-10-23, 2:39

Saim wrote:Btw tava means frying pan (as it does in Croatia; in Serbia it's tiganj, from Greek).

I know. It means the same thing in English (from Urdu توا‎/Hindi तवा).
Not sure where the oil (yağ) comes into this.

Maybe in Turkish, you can't heat the oil when cooking, only the pan you cook it in?

Here are some new words I learned from Turkish in Turkey (okay, some of these probably are words I should've already known, but still!). :P

bari - then (it's one of those words that doesn't really seem to mean anything in particular)
koy - bay
aşağıya inmek - to go (under)
ayrılmak - to separate
zaten - actually, in fact
çatallanmak - to fork, bifurcate
ileri - ahead
aşağı gitmek - to go down
Hayırdır - something like 'oh no, what happened?'
hastanelik - needing hospitalization
durum - condition
kıyı - coast
müracaat etmek - to apply (or check in, e.g. to a hospital?)

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby voron » 2018-10-23, 12:11

vijayjohn wrote:tavaya kızdırmak - to heat the oil

It doesn't look right. It should be accusative, not dative. And of course you can also say 'yağ kızdırmak' -- it doesn't matter which one of the two you heat.

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-10-24, 5:34

Oh, sorry, of course you're right; that was a typo on my part. :shock: It's just tavayı kızdırmak.

Here are the other words I learned from the source text in GLOSS:

mevsim - season (about frigging time I learned this word since it's related to monsoon, after all!)
gözde - favorite
istek - wish, desire, request
kıyma - minced meat (kheema!)
kuşbaşı - meat cube(s), cubed beef
çorba kaşığı - tablespoon
biber salçası - pepper paste
erimek - to melt, dissolve
eritilmek - to be melted, be dissolved
toz - dust
tencere - pan
sotelemek - to saute(!)
hafif - light
kabuk - scab, shell
yumuşak - soft, gay, queer
-ınca - when (I'm sure I'm supposed to know this by now but totally forgot :P)

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby dEhiN » 2018-11-15, 6:55

I'm thinking (all of a sudden) of re-learning Turkish. Well, more like learning the little bit I had learned once, and continuing. What would you guys recommend to start with?
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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby voron » 2018-11-15, 12:24

dEhiN wrote:I'm thinking (all of a sudden) of re-learning Turkish. Well, more like learning the little bit I had learned once, and continuing. What would you guys recommend to start with?

Assimil is good. (And it's in French, so you can also revise your French!)

Saim and I are fond of books which are used to teach the target language at the language courses in the country where it is spoken. Like this series named 'Istanbul' which Saim and Vijay are following in this group:
https://www.hepsiburada.com/istanbul-ya ... 000006MJRV

These books are usually monolingual, so you'd have to look up the grammar elsewhere. The pluses of these books are that they teach up-to-date language, and they are usually more fun than traditional textbooks (they have more lively dialogues and texts, and they have lots of pictures).

(You can easily find 'Istanbul' series in PDF).

EDIT: And of course there is also Duolingo Turkish, if you like Duolingo. Their Turkish course is pretty good.

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby księżycowy » 2018-11-15, 17:09

I have to say I'm very curious about the Istanbul textbooks. They don't have an English grammar book to go with them? Or explanations in English?

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby voron » 2018-11-15, 17:27

księżycowy wrote:I have to say I'm very curious about the Istanbul textbooks. They don't have an English grammar book to go with them? Or explanations in English?

I think I once downloaded a version which had grammar explanations in Arabic, so an English version should exist as well. Perhaps Saim knows better.

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby księżycowy » 2018-11-15, 18:24

Ok, I'll hunt around and see what I find, thanks voron. :)

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-11-15, 18:43

Since Saim, voron, and I are more than just beginners in Turkish at this point, if you have any questions about Turkish or need help navigating materials (especially monolingual materials), I think we could use this group to help you out as well as to keep studying on our own level. :)

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby księżycowy » 2018-11-15, 18:57

As interesting as Turkish might be, I think I hear Uzbek and Turkmen calling more. Might I snatch anyone for a study group?

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-11-15, 18:59

I think you'll burn out if you start another one now. :P

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby księżycowy » 2018-11-15, 19:00

Nah, I just put on a fire suit. I'm good.

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby vijayjohn » 2018-11-15, 19:12

So how're you doing on Aleut, Cayuga, Sumerian, Hokkien, Biblical Hebrew...I know I'm forgetting something, I just know it...and, oh right! Arrernte?

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Re: Turkish Study Group

Postby dEhiN » 2018-11-16, 0:37

voron wrote:
dEhiN wrote:I'm thinking (all of a sudden) of re-learning Turkish. Well, more like learning the little bit I had learned once, and continuing. What would you guys recommend to start with?

Assimil is good. (And it's in French, so you can also revise your French!)

Saim and I are fond of books which are used to teach the target language at the language courses in the country where it is spoken. Like this series named 'Istanbul' which Saim and Vijay are following in this group:
https://www.hepsiburada.com/istanbul-ya ... 000006MJRV

These books are usually monolingual, so you'd have to look up the grammar elsewhere. The pluses of these books are that they teach up-to-date language, and they are usually more fun than traditional textbooks (they have more lively dialogues and texts, and they have lots of pictures).

(You can easily find 'Istanbul' series in PDF).

EDIT: And of course there is also Duolingo Turkish, if you like Duolingo. Their Turkish course is pretty good.

Teşekkuler*! I have to do some digging around, but I think I once found some free monolingual pdfs for at least the first four CEFR levels. I didn't seem to have saved them to my Google Drive, so hopefully they are on an old computer.

I might try Duolingo just to start me off. In the past I haven't had much luck with motivation to stick to Duolingo, but maybe I'll just do the first several lessons and then move on.

*Thanks?
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