Latin - IpseDixit

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Latin - IpseDixit

Postby IpseDixit » 2014-05-01, 16:06

Trying Latin
Last edited by IpseDixit on 2014-05-31, 12:09, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Latin - IpseDixit

Postby Bernard » 2014-05-01, 16:32

Plurimum te iubeo salvere, IpseDixit. Equidem gaudeo te lingua Latina delectari. Nonne excellens quasi mater est sermonis tui patrii?
:congrats:

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Re: Latin - IpseDixit

Postby IpseDixit » 2014-05-01, 16:33

In English? :silly:

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Re: Latin - IpseDixit

Postby Bernard » 2014-05-01, 17:00

Plurimum te iubeo salvere, IpseDixit. Equidem gaudeo te lingua Latina delectari. Nonne excellens quasi mater est sermonis tui patrii? ...
:ohwell: (idiomatic Latin) I welcome you very much, IpseDixit. For my part, I rejoice that you have a liking for the Latin language. Isn't it quasi the excellent mother of your native language?

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Re: Latin - IpseDixit

Postby IpseDixit » 2014-05-01, 18:49

Exercise of today (translation):

[flag=]la[/flag] Romæ multæ deæ honorantur: Iuno, deorum regina et Iovis uxor, Diana, Minerva et Vesta. Diana silvarum et ferarum regina est et pharetra sagittisque in umbrosis silvis feras necat. Minerva, galea et hasta ornata, non solum sapientiæ dea est sed etiam pugnarum. Vesta, domesticæ vitæ dea, honoratur rosarum et violarum coronis a matronis et puellis. Juno, Diana, Minerva et Vesta etiam in Græcia honoratur, sed alio nomine: a Græcis enim appellantur Hera, Artemis, Athena et Hestia. Athena nomen dedit Athenis, quare Athenarum incolæ deam honorant ut patronam urbis. Athenæ etiam musarum, dearum artium, patria sunt. Poëtæ a Musis inflantur et claras athletarum victorias carminibus celebrant: quare poëtæ Musas amant et a Musis amantur.

[flag=]en[/flag] In Rome many Goddesses are worshipped. Juno, queen of the Gods and Jupiter's wife, Diana, Minerva and Vesta. Diana is the queen of the forests and the beasts and with her quiver and arrows she hunts (the dictionary tells me that literally it's "kills") beasts in dark forests. Minerva, adorned with a helm and a spear, not only is she the Goddess of knowledge but also of wars. Vesta, the Goddess of the hearth (lit: of the domestic life), is honored by matrons and children with crowns [made] of roses and pansies. Also in Greece Juno, Diana, Minerva and Vesta are worshipped, but with other names: indeed they're called Hera, Artemis, Athena and Hestia by the Greeks. Athens is named after Athena [lit: Athena gives [her] name to Athens], for this reason the inhabitants of Athens honour [this] Goddess as the protector of the city. Athens is also the land of the Muses, the Goddesses of the arts. Poets are inspired by the Muses and with chants they celebrate the famous victories of athletes: for this reason poets love the Muses and by the Muses they are loved.

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Re: Latin - IpseDixit

Postby Bernard » 2014-05-01, 19:41

IpseDixit wrote:...[flag=]la[/flag] in umbrosis silvis ... galea... pugnarum... patronam ... patria ...
[flag=]en[/flag]...in dark forests. ... helm...of wars. ... protector ... the land ...
:y: Nulla menda = no errors! Forsitan et apta sint haec verba = But perhaps the following words are suitable, too:
in umbrosis silvis = in shady forests (umbrosus = ombroso),
galea = helm (obs.) = helmet
pugnarum = of battles (pugna = battaglia),
patronam = protectress (patrona = protettrice),
patria = 'father'-land, i. e. native land.

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Re: Latin - IpseDixit

Postby IpseDixit » 2014-05-01, 19:48

Gratia tibi sit Bernard :)

That's true, war is bellum and dark is rather ater/fuscus/obscurus.

It's always difficult to translate the concept of patria in English!

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Re: Latin - IpseDixit

Postby Bernard » 2014-05-02, 8:14

IpseDixit wrote:...It's always difficult to translate the concept of patria in English!
Forsitan utilis tibi sit Lewis&Short = Perhaps Lewis&Short is useful to you,

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Re: Latin - IpseDixit

Postby IpseDixit » 2014-05-02, 10:24

Translation:

1) Hispania, Italia et Græcia Europæ peninsulæ sunt.
1) Spain, Italy and Greece are peninsulas of Europe.
2) Sicilia et Sardinia insulæ Italiæ sunt.
Siciliy and Sardinia are islands of Italy.
3) In poëtarum fabulis sæpe magna sapientia est.
3) In poets' tales you can often find/there is often great wisdom.
4) in Italiæ silvis multæ feræ erant.
4) In the forests of Italy there were many beasts.
5) Sæpe magistræ magna patientia est.
5) Teachers often have great patience.
6) Italiæ fluminum aqua limpida erat.
6) The water of Italian rivers was limpid.
7) Romæ sumus et libenter manemus
7) We are in Rome and we gladly remain [here]
8) Fortuna cæca est.
8) Fate is blind.
9) Syracusæ patria nautarum erant.
9) Syracuse was the native land of sailors.
10) Discipulæ, sedulæ este!
10) Pupils, be careful!
11) Matronis Romanis mutlæ ancillæ erant.
11) Roman matrons had many handmaids.
12) In Græcia eramus, nunc in Italia sumus.
12) We were in Greece, now we are in Italy.
13) Parva erat discordiæ causa
13) The cause of discord was small.
14) Pulvis et umbra sumus.
14) We are dust and shade.
15) Agricolæ duæ pulchræ filæ sunt.
15) The farmers have two beautiful daughters.
16) Frugifera terra olearum et uvæ magnam copiam agricolis præbet.
16) Fertile land gives abundance of oil and grapes to the farmers.
17) Miverva, sapietiæ dea, et Diana, silvarum dea, et in provinciis et Romæ honorantur.
17) Minerva, the Goddess of knowledge, and Diana, the Goddess of the forests, are worshipped both in the provinces and in Rome.
18) Divitiæ non semper lætitiæ causa sunt.
18) Wealth not always is cause of happiness.
19) Domina per ancillas epulas convivis parat.
19) The mistress prepares the banquets to those who will attend it (I can't find an English word) thanks to (lit: through) [her] handmaids.
20) Athenæ poëtarum nautarumque patria erant.
20) Athens was the (native) land of poets and sailors.
21) Fortuna nautas non semper iuvat.
21) Fate not always helps the sailors.
22) Dominæ non multæ ancillæ sunt sed sedulæ.
22) The mistress doesn't have many handmaids but they're diligent.
23) Agricolarum vita sæpe industriæ patientiæque magistra est.
23)The life of farmers is often teacher of industriousness and patience.
24) Persarum copiæ in Græcia sunt: nam Thebæ atque Athenæ obsidentur et delentur.
24) The Persian troops (lit: the troops of the Persians) are in Greece: indeed in Thebes and in Athens they have been occupied and destroyed. ( Does it refer to the Persians or to the inhabitants of the cities)
25) Agricola sapientia et parsimonia fortunas suas administrat.
25) The farmer manages their fortunes with knowledge and thrift.
26) Graciæ incolæ magna cum audacia Persarum insidias vitant.
26) The inhabitants of Greece with great audacity escape the Persian threat (lit: the threat of the Persians)
27) Nec in Graecia, nec in Hispania habitamus, sed in Italia.
27) We live neither in Greece nor Spain, but in Italy.

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Re: Latin - IpseDixit

Postby Bernard » 2014-05-02, 15:30

SALVE, IpseDixit!
:waytogo:
Caution! I am no anglicist!
5) Sæpe magistræ magna patientia est.
Teachers often have great patience.
Either "The (lady) teacher has often great patience" (magistrae dat. sing.) or "The patience of the (lady) teacher is often great " (magistrae genet. sing.). NB Anche la lingua latina gode di una notevole libertà di posizione dei singoli elementi della proposizione!
11) Matronis Romanis mutlæ ancillæ erant.
multae
15) Agricolæ duæ pulchræ filiæ sunt.
The farmers have two beautiful daughters.
agricolae: dat. sing.: "The farmer has two &c."
18) Divitiæ non semper lætitiæ causa sunt.
Wealth is not always the cause of happiness.
19) Domina per ancillas epulas convivis parat.
The mistress prepares the banquets to the guests (table-companions) by (lit: through) her handmaids (conviva, ae m. [or f.], 'convitato').
21) Fortuna nautas non semper iuvat.
Fate does not always help the sailors.
22) Dominæ non multæ ancillæ sunt sed sedulæ.
The mistress doesn't have many handmaids but diligent ones.
24) Persarum copiæ in Græcia sunt: nam Thebæ atque Athenæ obsidentur et delentur.
24) The Persian troops (lit: the troops of the Persians) are in Greece: ...
nam: for / Thebae, Athenae: nom. plur., subject. / obsidentur, delentur: 3. pers. plur. praes. pass. >> for Thebes and Athens are being besieged and destroyed.
26) Graciæ incolæ magna cum audacia Persarum insidias vitant.
The inhabitants of Greece escape the Persian ambush with great audacity (insidiae, arum f. [a so-called plurale tantum] ambush, 'insidie', 'agguati').
VALE.

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Re: Latin - IpseDixit

Postby IpseDixit » 2014-05-30, 9:46

My interest for Latin is already over :lol: sorry.


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