A latin phrase to be translated

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silex
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A latin phrase to be translated

Postby silex » 2009-08-10, 14:24

Hello people.
I'm trying to translate to phrase "Silex nemine volvutum est" to english..
And, is this phrase correct in the grammer department?

please help :)

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Re: A latin phrase to be translated

Postby KingHarvest » 2009-08-11, 3:28

This sentence doesn't make any sense.
Most men are rather stupid, and most of those who are not stupid are, consequently, rather vain.
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Re: A latin phrase to be translated

Postby silex » 2009-08-11, 4:54

Hmmm okay, so how do you say "A stone which no one rolls"?

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Re: A latin phrase to be translated

Postby Babelfish » 2009-08-15, 13:51

"Silex nemine volvitur", I suppose... Or "silex nemine volutus est" if you mean it was never rolled in the past.

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Re: A latin phrase to be translated

Postby silex » 2009-08-15, 17:19

Babelfish wrote:"Silex nemine volvitur", I suppose... Or "silex nemine volutus est" if you mean it was never rolled in the past.


I mean that no one rolls it in the present, not in the past.
oh, and if "no one" can get a plural/singular meaning in Latin, then it should be plural.
Is it "Silex nemine volvitur" then?

In case you speak hebrew, it should be a translation of the arameic phrase "אבן שאין לה הופכין".

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Re: A latin phrase to be translated

Postby KingHarvest » 2009-08-15, 22:49

Silex is a pretty rare word, saxum would be much more normal. And agency is expressed with a(b). So the sentence should be saxum a nemine volvitur.
Most men are rather stupid, and most of those who are not stupid are, consequently, rather vain.
-A.E. Housman

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Re: A latin phrase to be translated

Postby Babelfish » 2009-08-17, 14:16

I vaguely remember a note about Wheelock saying that "nullō/nullā" is used as the ablative of "nemō", for whatever reason :hmm:

I certainly know the Hebrew expression "אבן שאין לה הופכין" :) But such a fixed expression may have standard parallels in other languages which aren't literal translations...

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Re: A latin phrase to be translated

Postby KingHarvest » 2009-08-18, 3:59

Nullo is more commonly used than nemine, but it is not obligatory.
Most men are rather stupid, and most of those who are not stupid are, consequently, rather vain.
-A.E. Housman

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Re: A latin phrase to be translated

Postby silex » 2009-08-18, 16:41

Babelfish wrote:I vaguely remember a note about Wheelock saying that "nullō/nullā" is used as the ablative of "nemō", for whatever reason :hmm:

I certainly know the Hebrew expression "אבן שאין לה הופכין" :) But such a fixed expression may have standard parallels in other languages which aren't literal translations...


I'm seeking for the literal translation for that phrase.
Any meanings can be left untranslated.

So, is there a consensus about the translation?

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Re: A latin phrase to be translated

Postby Ahmes » 2009-08-18, 19:27

KingHarvest wrote:Silex is a pretty rare word, saxum would be much more normal. And agency is expressed with a(b). So the sentence should be saxum a nemine volvitur.

I have two questions to the scholarly forum members:

1. Why use ā/ab here? doesn't qui have the meaning of which? I read in the dictionary that one of the meanings of ā/ab is "of origin and agency; especially with passive verbs, [by, at the hands of, because of]", but is it really the desired word here, or is qui also OK (a stone which no one rolls)?

2. Is there a difference between saxum and lapis?

Thanks.

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Re: A latin phrase to be translated

Postby KingHarvest » 2009-08-19, 7:52

1.) Yes, if I had been paying closer attention to what he wanted, the sentence should have been saxum quod nemo volvit.

2.) A lapis is a pebble, gemstone, a stone of some sort of religious significance, or some sort of worked stone usually. A saxum is just a hunk of rock.
Most men are rather stupid, and most of those who are not stupid are, consequently, rather vain.
-A.E. Housman


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