Latin Questions

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culúrien
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Latin Questions

Postby culúrien » 2009-06-15, 20:08

I started learning Latin a couple weeks ago and I'll post my questions here.
Llevo un par de semanas empazando a aprender el latín y escribiré mis preguntas aquí

What does this mean? "Graecorum antiquorum erit gloria sempiterna." Everlasting glory will be the ancient Greeks' "?
Qué quiere decir esto? "Graecorum antiquorum erit gloria sempiterna." La gloria eterna pertenecerá a los griegos clásicos?
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KingHarvest
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Re: Latin Questions

Postby KingHarvest » 2009-06-15, 20:10

Yes.
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Nero

Re: Latin Questions

Postby Nero » 2009-09-28, 14:17

"Graecorum antiquorum erit gloria sempiterna"

It could also mean, "The glory of the Ancient Greeks will be everlasting"

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Re: Latin Questions

Postby lumiel » 2009-11-28, 14:07

Is it okay if I borrow this thread a bit? Didn't want to start a new thread because of this...

I was wondering if someone could read these translations and correct the mistakes in them. It's a translation exercise from an old Latin study book and I just thought I'd give it a try.

1. The daughter of Latona loves the forests.
Filia Latonae silvas amat.

2. Latona's daughter carries arrows.
Filia Latonae sagittas portat.

3. The farmers' daughters do labor.
Filiae agricolarum laborant.

4. The farmer's daughter loves the waters of the forest.
Filia agricolae aquas silvae amat.

5. The sailor is announcing the girls' flight.
Nauta fugam puellarum nuntiat.

6. The girls announce the sailors' wrongs.
Puellae causas nautarum nuntiant.

7. The farmer's daughter labors.
Filia agricolae laborat.

8. Diana's arrows are killing the wild beasts of the land.
Sagittae Dianae feras terrae necant.
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KingHarvest
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Re: Latin Questions

Postby KingHarvest » 2009-11-29, 0:28

They're all fine grammatically. Usually, though, genitives precede the noun that they qualify, and there are a few instances where, though technically what you're writing is correct, it is very ambiguous, e.g. Filia Latonae sagittas portat. reads more like, "The daughter carries Latona's arrows."
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Re: Latin Questions

Postby lumiel » 2009-11-29, 4:40

KingHarvest wrote:They're all fine grammatically. Usually, though, genitives precede the noun that they qualify, and there are a few instances where, though technically what you're writing is correct, it is very ambiguous, e.g. Filia Latonae sagittas portat. reads more like, "The daughter carries Latona's arrows."

Yes, the sentences make much more sense if the genitive is placed before the noun that they qualify instead putting them after them, although my study book says differently... :|
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Re: Latin Questions

Postby KingHarvest » 2009-11-29, 6:17

Take my word for it, your study book is wrong. It's not just a Latin thing, it's a pan-Indo-European thing in which it is (generally speaking) preferred that a genitive precedes the noun that it qualifies, even in English in which the genitive is mostly an anachronism, e.g. The dog's bone.
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Re: Latin Questions

Postby utku » 2009-12-08, 2:03

I want to express a phrase in latin, but I am not sure about the right way to do it. Could you please help?

Here... I want to say "Leisure time activity". Is "negotium otii" proper for that? I suggested to use genitive. Is there a way to express it by means of noun adjunct??

Or based on the discussion about genitive above "otii negotium"???

thank you for helping...

By the way, hi culúrien... It's a little bit piracy to write into your topic but i just didn't open a new one :) Yours was at the top of the list among these the most relevant to my issue. I also started to learn Latin recently...
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Re: Latin Questions

Postby kalemiye » 2010-02-09, 17:39

utku wrote:I want to express a phrase in latin, but I am not sure about the right way to do it. Could you please help?

Here... I want to say "Leisure time activity". Is "negotium otii" proper for that? I suggested to use genitive. Is there a way to express it by means of noun adjunct??

Or based on the discussion about genitive above "otii negotium"???

thank you for helping...

By the way, hi culúrien... It's a little bit piracy to write into your topic but i just didn't open a new one :) Yours was at the top of the list among these the most relevant to my issue. I also started to learn Latin recently...


Hello, I don't have any idea about how to say 'Leisure time activity', but Otium means leisure time as you know. Negotium means 'business', 'occupation' and 'employment', but not activity :| . What are you exactly trying to say?

Nevertheless, you have to be aware that people normally doesn't study Latin to be actually able to write and/or speak it (unless you are the Pope :lol:), but mainly to read it, and that a lot of modern vocabulary and expressions are probably non-existant.
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