help me! (magister- magistri)

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KingHarvest
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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby KingHarvest » 2009-11-01, 17:49

Yes, why don't you post the sentence so that we can try to figure out what the typo is.
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Martine
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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2009-11-01, 19:02

Here goes the sentence:
Paucis post diebus domum Nasicae venit Ennius et ostarium rogavit: "Estne domi dominus tuus?"
The story is about Nasica, which is "sole oriente". I don't know if it's important, but firstly I thought what "ostarium" has something to do with "oriente". However I think that it's wrong.

I have one more question connected with another text. Can't find the meaning of the word "pergamenis". What's the first form of it? Pergamenus? My dictionary knows nothing about it. Please, help me.
Greetings.

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby modus.irrealis » 2009-11-01, 19:19

That's why it's always a good idea to post context ;). It should be "ostiarium": "and asked the doorman".

"Pergamenus" is an adjective derived from the city Pergamum. So it could mean "of Pergamenus", referring perhaps to the inhabitants. But in the feminine it also means "parchment" (in fact, "parchment" is the same word) so that may also fit.

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2009-11-07, 11:26

Thank you so much :)

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2009-12-12, 12:17

I'm doing grammar exercises very difficult ones :( And I have some problems with them.

1) I don't know if the sentence: "Bello Troiano proelium contra Hectorem et Achillem fuit" is correct. I put into the gasp the word "contra".

2) I don't know which word to choose for putting into the gasp. I've four: eisque, eoque, eamque, idque
Here goes the sentence: " Dux Parthorum vulnus accepit.... interiit". What should be in? To be honest, I can't ever translate this sentence, so I can't guess according to the context.

3) In the sentence: "Parentes filios admonebant, ut praeceptores....." I have to find out the correct word: colant, colebant, colerent and coluissent. I think that no of this verbs is connecting to the future, isn't it?

4) What should be in the gasp in the sentence: "Caesar pontem in flumine.... curavit". It can be one of this verbs: "facientem", "factam", "faciendum" or "faciendam".


Please, help me... It's really difficult.

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby modus.irrealis » 2009-12-12, 16:21

1) I think "contra" is grammatical but it doesn't make sense because it would mean there was a combat against Hector and Achilles, but they were on different sides. I believe you need "inter" = "between".

2) It's "The leader of the Parthians received a wound and died ....". I think it should be clear now which is the only that fits.

3) Here you need a subjunctive because of the "ut". But because of the sequence of tenses (consecutio temporum), the fact that "admonebant" is a past tense means you have to use a past subjunctive. Now the perfect subjunctive refers to events prior to the main verb while the imperfect subjunctive refers to events that are simultaneous with or that would take place after the main verb. So only one option makes sense here.

4) This construction with "curo" uses the gerundive, so using the fact that "pons" is masculine, only one of the choices is possible.

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby KingHarvest » 2009-12-13, 5:22

And the English word is gap not gasp - a gasp is the sound you make when something startles you :wink:
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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2010-01-18, 15:53

modus.irrealis and KingHarvest thank you for your help. The Latin grammar is very difficult.

2) It's "The leader of the Parthians received a wound and died ....". I think it should be clear now which is the only that fits.


I've chosen "Eoque".

In this sentence: "Parentes filios admonebant, ut praeceptores....." I added colebant.

I've chosen "faciendum" in the 4th sentence: "Caesar pontem in flumine faciendum curavit"

I still don't know if it's correct...

Now I'm translating the text "de druibus". I don't know the meaning of the word "consuerunt". Can you help me? Is it connected with "cosulere"?

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby modus.irrealis » 2010-01-19, 0:34

Martine wrote:I've chosen "Eoque".

That's correct.

In this sentence: "Parentes filios admonebant, ut praeceptores....." I added colebant.

It has to colerent, because you need the subjunctive.

I've chosen "faciendum" in the 4th sentence: "Caesar pontem in flumine faciendum curavit"

That's right -- you need the masculine faciendum because it goes with pontem.

Now I'm translating the text "de druibus". I don't know the meaning of the word "consuerunt". Can you help me? Is it connected with "cosulere"?

It's from consuesco. It's a contracted form from consueverunt where the -v- drops out. Note that this verb often has a present meaning in the perfect tense, so consuevi = "I am accustomed to".

And do you mean "De Druidibus"? What kind of text is this because it sounds interesting?

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby KingHarvest » 2010-01-19, 0:56

I'd have to be honest and admit I've never heard of it either, assuming it's an authentic text and not a school exercise.
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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2010-01-19, 11:32

It's an authentic text. It comes from "Commentarii de bello Gallico" by Julius Caesar. You can find this here: http://www.forumromanum.org/literature/ ... llic6.html (14-6)
modus.irrealis Thank you so much. I have the same problem with the word "coveniunt". First I thought it comes from "conveniunt", but I think it's not correct. Here goes the sentence: "Tantis excitati praemiis et sua sponte multi in disciplinam coveniunt". IMO it means "to bring discipline".

KingHarvest and modus.irrealis How long have you been learning Latin? I wish I could Latin as good as you.

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby modus.irrealis » 2010-01-19, 16:01

Ah, I see -- I thought it might be some separate document. That must be an alternate spelling for "conveniunt", which is in fact the link you have. "Disciplinam" probably has the meaning "instruction" here and together with "conveniunt" it's something like "come together for instruction", although I'm not really sure of the use of "convenio" here.

I've been working on my Latin now for almost exactly ten years.

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby KingHarvest » 2010-01-19, 17:01

I believe I'm in my 9th year.
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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2010-01-20, 18:32

I've been learning since the last school year ;) So about 1,5 year.

Could you tell me why do you learn Latin? Is it useful in life for you? Sometimes I think- why do we have to learn Latin at school, it's not as needed as for example French or German.

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby modus.irrealis » 2010-01-21, 2:34

I think I learned just because it's there, like climbing Everest. The language I'm really interested in is Greek, but I figured, why not do Latin too and have both Classical languages. I can't see how it's been useful to me, unless you think being able to decipher Latin mottos is a useful skill, but I've enjoyed learning Latin.

So you have to learn it at school? Is this a left-over from when you weren't considered educated if you hadn't suffered through Latin lessons? Or is this due to religion? Latin is of course crucial for Catholicism and my impression is that Poland is very religious.

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2010-01-22, 17:06

Every one in my class has to learn Latin. We don't have any choice. However we are learning Latin, because we've got Polish and History as main subjects. So there are many people who want to be layers, translators etc.
In Poland there are many people, who are interested in Latin because of religion. In many churches one can hear songs in Latin, not in Polish. Many people, who have never learned Latin can say some prays in Latin.
Maybe can you recommend me some good Latin- English online dictionary?

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby KingHarvest » 2010-01-22, 17:24

The Perseus Project and William Whittaker's Words are both good. They're the first thing that pop up in Google when you search either.
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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2010-01-22, 19:20

KingHarvest Thank you very much.

I still have question. I do nothing more but translating Latin text during the last days. It's too much...
Don't know how to translate the sentence: "Vos data dacultate vobis consulite". I don't know what to do with verbs with "ite" ending. What is the first form? How to translate it?
Could you tell me if the word "inrupit" comes from "incipere"?
I know meaning of the word "inquit"- he/she/it said, however I don't know what it comes from. I know that the first person singular form is "inquam".

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby KingHarvest » 2010-01-23, 0:04

Vos data dacultate vobis consulite


There must be an et, -que, or some sort of punctuation missing here or something. It should also be decultate. They're both just 2nd person imperatives. "Hide away the given things and make council for yourselves." Consulite is the 2nd person imperative of consulo.

Could you tell me if the word "inrupit" comes from "incipere"?


Of course it doesn't. It comes from inrumpo. (also irrumpo, irrumpere, etc.)

I know meaning of the word "inquit"- he/she/it said, however I don't know what it comes from. I know that the first person singular form is "inquam".


inquam is what it comes from, your question makes no sense.
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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby modus.irrealis » 2010-01-23, 3:41

Martine wrote:Every one in my class has to learn Latin. We don't have any choice. However we are learning Latin, because we've got Polish and History as main subjects. So there are many people who want to be layers, translators etc.
In Poland there are many people, who are interested in Latin because of religion. In many churches one can hear songs in Latin, not in Polish. Many people, who have never learned Latin can say some prays in Latin.

That makes sense. Being Greek Orthodox, I had to learn my prayers and hymns and so on in Ancient Greek in Sunday School, even though most of the time, there was a word here or there I'd understand, but the rest would be a string of nonsense syllables :lol:.

KingHarvest wrote:There must be an et, -que, or some sort of punctuation missing here or something. It should also be decultate. They're both just 2nd person imperatives. "Hide away the given things and make council for yourselves." Consulite is the 2nd person imperative of consulo.

It was the "d" that was the typo, since Caesar wrote "facultate".

inquam is what it comes from, your question makes no sense.

Perhaps she's learned the infinitive as the base form. In that case, inquam is one of the rare verbs that simply has no infinitive.


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