help me! (magister- magistri)

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Martine
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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2009-06-20, 8:49

I have another question. I'm translating a text and I don't know the meaning of one word.

"Aditum petentibus conveniundi non dabat, superbe respondebat, crudeliter imperabat"

I really don't know what "petentibus" means. Can you help me?

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Babelfish » 2009-06-20, 14:30

"petentibus" is the present participle of "peto, petere", plural dative (or ablative, but I'd guess dative in this sentence - not that I understand it anyway without context).

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2009-06-21, 7:32

תודה רבה על העזרה :)

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2009-06-21, 15:05

Another question. I really don't know how to translate the phrase "cum clara ad eum". Here goes the sentence : Id postquam Lacedaemonii rescierunt, in qua more illorum erat scriptum.

I find it difficult also to translate"in qua more illorum erat...". Is "more" a form of "mors-mortis"? :hmm: Please help me :)

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby modus.irrealis » 2009-06-21, 15:28

There's no "cum clara ad eum" in your sentence!

"more" is the ablative of "mos", which means a lot of things but here means "manner" or "custom" so "more illorum erat scriptum" = "had been written in their way" or "according to their custom".

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2009-06-21, 17:49

Thank you a lot for your help, modus.irrealis Sorry, my mistake :P I just left it.
Id postquam Lacedaemonii rescierunt, legatos cum clava ad eum miserunt, in qua more illorum erat scriptum.

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby modus.irrealis » 2009-06-21, 20:45

Ah -- "cum clava" means they sent them with a staff (or whatever a clava was exactly) and "in qua" refers back to "clava". "ad eum" here just goes with "miserunt" -- I assume the larger context makes it clear who "eum" refers to.

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby KingHarvest » 2009-06-21, 22:04

This is probably referring to a scytale.
Most men are rather stupid, and most of those who are not stupid are, consequently, rather vain.
-A.E. Housman

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby modus.irrealis » 2009-06-22, 0:26

Interesting. And since the article mentions that the Spartans used it in particular, "more illorum" could refer specifically to that.

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2009-06-28, 11:15

Thanks modus.irrealis and KingHarvest. Now I can see how difficult Latin is...
I've got another question. I wonder that "facturos" means. In the sentence:
"Mox, etsi intellegabant se non sine periculo id facturos, speluncam intraverunt (..)"

Please, help me...

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby modus.irrealis » 2009-06-28, 12:09

"facturus" is the future active participle, but its most common use is probably to form the future active infinitive "facturus esse", which is what you have here. So for example:

dixit, "id faciam" > dixit se id facturum esse
he said, "I'll do it" > he said that he would do it

but it's very common for the "esse" to be dropped like in your sentence.

(You can always recognize the participle because it ends in -urus -- remember futurus -- and in fact, for almost all verbs you can just replace the -us of the perfect participle with -urus: factus > facturus, amatus > amaturus, defensus > defensurus.)

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2009-07-01, 11:29

Thank you a lot! You must be very clever to remember all Latin rules :) I'm still translating a text about "Ulixes". And I have another question...
I don't know the meaning of "celerrime"? What form is it? Is it a noun? I can find this world in my dictionary :/ I want to translate this text as soon as possible, but it's endless work for me... :roll: The word "celerrime" was used in this sentence:

Postridie eius diei Ulixes ex hac insula quam celerrime discedere in animo habebat.

Please, help me...

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby KingHarvest » 2009-07-01, 14:47

Celerrime is the adverbial form of celerrimus, the superlative of celer, "fast, quick."

Note that quam used with a superlative means "as <blank> as possible," where you fill in the <blank> with the meaning of the superlative, i.e. here it means "as quickly as possible."
Most men are rather stupid, and most of those who are not stupid are, consequently, rather vain.
-A.E. Housman

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2009-07-01, 16:53

Thank you a lot. Where did you learn Latin, KingHarvest ?

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby KingHarvest » 2009-07-01, 19:27

I learned it in high school and at my college.
Most men are rather stupid, and most of those who are not stupid are, consequently, rather vain.
-A.E. Housman

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2009-07-02, 8:36

Your Latin is really great.
And I have another question. I can't find a word "adflictam". I don't know the meaning. Here goes the sentence with this word:
"Ubi tamen ad litus descendit, navem suam tempestatibus tam adflictam invenit ut ad navigandum paene inutilis esset. "
Help me... :roll:

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby KingHarvest » 2009-07-02, 16:42

It's the past participle of adfligo, "to dash, overthrow, overturn, harass, distress, injure, make suffer" (the English cognate is "afflict"), so the sentence is, "When he came down to the shore, he found his ship so damaged by the storms that it was practically useless for sailing."
Most men are rather stupid, and most of those who are not stupid are, consequently, rather vain.
-A.E. Housman

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2009-07-02, 17:46

Thank you so much, KingHarvest
Image

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Babelfish » 2009-07-03, 12:50

Some Latin dictionaries might show "affligo" rather than "adfligo" (or show both forms) since assimilations like this have apparently taken place in Latin already, at some period or other.
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מן המקום בו אנו צודקים לא יפרחו לעולם פרחים באביב (יהודה עמיחי)
From the place where we are in the right, flowers will never grow in the spring (Yhuda Amihay)

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Re: help me! (magister- magistri)

Postby Martine » 2009-07-05, 13:31

My dictionary shows the word "affligo". However I didn't know that it means the same as "adfligo". Thank you, Babelfish

Now i can't translate the whole sentence. Here it goes:
Orestem furiae cum exagitarent, Delphos sciscitatum est profectus, quis tandem modus esset aerumnarum.

I know the meaning of every word, but together it doesn't make sens for me... :roll: Please, help me


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