"Easiest" language?

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Nukalurk
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Re: Norwegian Indonesian

Postby Nukalurk » 2007-09-10, 21:11

0stsee wrote:But all in all one can say that in English [...] you speak the way you write.


You must be joking. :shock:

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0stsee
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Re: Norwegian Indonesian

Postby 0stsee » 2007-09-10, 21:29

Amikeco wrote:
0stsee wrote:But all in all one can say that in English [...] you speak the way you write.


You must be joking. :shock:

Please take a look at the context of what I wrote. Or learn Indonesian, or Arabic, or Norwegian, then go to the country where it is spoken and listen to how people speak. Then you'll know what I'm talking about.
This is a phenomenon unknown to most of English speakers..
Ini tandatanganku.

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0stsee
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Re: Norwegian Indonesian

Postby 0stsee » 2007-09-10, 21:34

Daniel wrote:
0stsee wrote:But all in all one can say that in English [...] you speak the way you write.


I'm not sure.

In the case of the UK, the spoken language varies region to region.

There are many indigenous English dialects in the UK (even in England) that are so different that it is incomprehensible to other speakers from different parts of the country.

For example, someone from Birmingham may say "Kip aert th'oss road!" or someone from Manchester may say "He ain't done nowt in t'shop..." and someone in Yorkshire may say "Give the book me!"

Yes. I can imagine that the situation in England might be similar. But somehow it is hard to illustrate what I meant to many people, or I guess I'm just bad at explaining. :roll:
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0stsee
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Re: Norwegian Indonesian

Postby 0stsee » 2007-09-10, 21:46

Amikeco wrote:
0stsee wrote:But all in all one can say that in English [...] you speak the way you write.


You must be joking. :shock:

Ah, I see that you're in Germany.

I think it is well known that Swiss people only write German and don't really speak it.
In Indonesia (or I'll say Jakarta now) the situation is similar. There is a written variation of the language, and there is the spoken one, which you don't really write down, except probably when you're writing SMS to your friend.
In English, mostly there is not such a distance between the written language and everyday language.


For example in Indonesian:

Written Standard Indonesian:
"Apakah yang sedang kaulakukan?"

Spoken (in Jakarta):
"Lagi ngapain loe?"

And nobody would speak like the first one. It is only written..
Ini tandatanganku.

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Multiturquoise
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Re: It is TURKISH!! Research proved that!!

Postby Multiturquoise » 2017-10-23, 13:32

Fra wrote:It is Turkish. Turkish is the easiest for sure. But not necessarily for English speakers, this is for everyone in general.


I'm sorry for interrupting the thread, but despite being a native speaker of Turkish, I'm generally unsure about which preposition goes with which verb. Turkish is actually not easy, assuming the language has many words derived from Arabic and Persian. Anatolian and non-Istanbulite Rumelian dialects are more irregular than the standard Istanbulite Turkish when it comes to the phonology, the morphology and sometimes also the syntax. For example I'm from the Western Black Sea province of Bolu, dialects may vary by region, province and even district (I'm from Seben) and there are many words in my dialect which are different from Istanbulite Turkish. If you live in a province other than Istanbul, you may encounter lots of different words while speaking to a native of the area, otherwise you forget them more easily even if you are a native of Anatolia.
Native: (tr)
Fluent: (el)
Learning: (ka) (en)


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