IpseDixit - Indonesian

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IpseDixit
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IpseDixit - Indonesian

Postby IpseDixit » 2017-06-13, 13:25

Hi, how do I translate the verb "to have" to Indonesian (to indicate possession)? I have looked it up in this dictionary and got a lot of different results. Any help, please?

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Re: IpseDixit - Indonesian

Postby Ser » 2017-06-14, 2:17

I asked an Indonesian guy about this, and:

<Serafin> IndonGuy: how does one express "have" in Indonesian
<IndonGuy> I have a dick > Saya punya kontol.
<IndonGuy> I don't have a dick > Saya tidak punya kontol
<IndonGuy> Hm
<gaagididaazod> pls gloss
<IndonGuy> I think punya is colloquial
<IndonGuy> Saya memiliki kontol.
<Serafin> it's literally 1SG have dick
<IndonGuy> saya punya kontol > i have dick
<Serafin> is there anything interesting about "to have" in Indonesian
<Serafin> perhaps in terms of TAM-marking, or synonyms, or the expression of "have" with certain nouns, or anything?
<IndonGuy> This is Indon not an Eurolang.
<IndonGuy> But in colloquial there are construct like this.
<IndonGuy> Saya punya buku > I have a buku.
<IndonGuy> Buku ini punya saya > This book belongs to me
<IndonGuy> The formal form is "Saya memiliki (sebuah) buku" and "Buku ini dimiliki oleh saya".
<IndonGuy> "mempunyai" is also a word, but I have never heard anyone use the word "dipunyai".
<IndonGuy> But anyway the point is, in colloquial Indonesian both passive and active for "have" has no conjugation at all.
<Serafin> well, see, that is interesting
<IndonGuy> This seems to be unique, not all verbs in colloquial are used like that.
<IndonGuy> To add further to the ambiguity the word punya in coll-speak can also used as participle.
<IndonGuy> "Ambil punya saya saja" >> take have I instead >> take mine instead

So, memiliki is a formal transitive verb meaning "to have [sth]", punya is a colloquial verb meaning both "to have [sth]" and "to be possessed by [sb]" (buku ini punya saya), dimiliki oleh means "to be possessed by [sb]", mempunyai is less common but also means "have [sth]".
carmina vel caelo possunt deducere lunam (Vergilius, Eclogae VIII.69)

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Re: IpseDixit - Indonesian

Postby IpseDixit » 2017-06-14, 16:00

Thanks!

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Re: IpseDixit - Indonesian

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-10-15, 1:27

Serafín wrote:in colloquial Indonesian both passive and active for "have" has no conjugation at all.

Because no verb in Indonesian has any conjugation at all. :P

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Re: IpseDixit - Indonesian

Postby Ser » 2017-10-15, 6:56

vijayjohn wrote:
Serafín wrote:in colloquial Indonesian both passive and active for "have" has no conjugation at all.

Because no verb in Indonesian has any conjugation at all. :P

The Indonesian guy I talked to that time seems to have said that some or many verbs in colloquial Indonesian do distinguish the active and passive voices though. I don't know any Indonesian.
carmina vel caelo possunt deducere lunam (Vergilius, Eclogae VIII.69)

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Re: IpseDixit - Indonesian

Postby vijayjohn » 2017-10-15, 16:13

Ah, never mind. I think I just misunderstood what he was trying to say. Indonesian never has subject-verb agreement markers or anything, which is what I thought he meant; it's always just pronoun + verb stem (or just the verb stem in some cases where the pronoun is clear enough from context, I guess).


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