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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-07-15, 18:47
by salieri
Takk.

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-07-16, 22:34
by mik59
Da var i Norge i forrige uke jeg så at mange mennesker løper der på Oslo. Jeg kommer fra Kroatia og her ingen løper på gaten. Vet dere hvorfor er det som det er?

Takk for hjelpen:)

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-07-28, 18:08
by Raufoss
Velkommen til det norske språk forumet, mik59! :welcome:

mik59 wrote:Da var i Norge i forrige uke jeg så at mange mennesker løper der på Oslo. Jeg kommer fra Kroatia og her ingen løper på gaten. Vet dere hvorfor er det som det er?
Det var mange løpere nær Bislett Stadion i Oslo under en av mine turer til Norge, men fant ut senere var det på grunn av Oslo Maraton. Kanskje var det en annen løper konkurranse eller du så mennesker trening for Oslo maraton som vil skje i to måneder.

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-07-29, 1:56
by Raufoss
29. juli er Olsok i Norge. Foruten flyr det norske flagget er det noe annet spesielt at nordmenn gjør på denne dagen?

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-07-29, 20:37
by Raufoss
God Olsok alle sammen!

Tidligere i dag har jeg lært fra en norsk venn at det er ni dager med arrangementer i Trondheim. :y:

Olavsfestdagene

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Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-07-30, 12:33
by tahmoores
Hello

I'm looking for a better translation for "Et dukkehjem." How do you translate this?
Is it "A Doll's House" or "A Doll House" or something else?
Could you please explain about it.
This is the title of a play by Henrik Ibsen.

Thank you.

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-07-30, 17:02
by Raufoss
tahmoores wrote:Hello
Hei tahmoores og velkommen til det norske språk forumet! :welcome:

tahmoores wrote:I'm looking for a better translation for "Et dukkehjem." How do you translate this?
Is it "A Doll's House" or "A Doll House" or something else?
The most common English translation that I've seen of Ibsen's play Et dukkehjem is "A Doll's House."

A Doll's House

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-08-19, 11:24
by Raufoss
Gratulerer med dagen kronprinsesse Mette-Marit! :birthday:

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Kronprinsesse Mette-Marit

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-08-22, 2:52
by TeneReef

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-09-12, 13:18
by keme
The title "Et dukkehjem" translates verbatim to "a doll's home". I think that for a "doll's house" you would say "dukkehus" or "dukkestue" also in Ibsen's time, iow. he made a conscious choice of the wording, while still making the association to the toy doll's house.

"Home" implies real personalities, which conflicts with the "doll" reference. This contrast is, I believe, a part of the work, and lost in translation.... :(

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-09-12, 18:09
by TeneReef
Velkomen tilbake keme, :wave:
Korleis går det?

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-09-12, 22:54
by Raufoss
keme wrote:The title "Et dukkehjem" translates verbatim to "a doll's home". I think that for a "doll's house" you would say "dukkehus" or "dukkestue" also in Ibsen's time, iow. he made a conscious choice of the wording, while still making the association to the toy doll's house.

"Home" implies real personalities, which conflicts with the "doll" reference. This contrast is, I believe, a part of the work, and lost in translation.... :(
Takk for denne svært interessant informasjon. :y:

Hvordan skriver man "lost in translation" på norsk?

Ville det være "tapt i oversettelsen" kanskje? :hmm:

TeneReef wrote:Velkomen tilbake keme, :wave:
:woohoo:

God helg alle sammen!

Skål!! :cheery:

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-10-02, 19:38
by Raufoss
TeneReef wrote:Korleis går det?
I recently came across this nynorsk expression in another language forum and learned that it can be translated into English as "How's it going?"

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-10-12, 21:38
by Cincimatti
About 10 years ago, a guest to my home in Germany brought a CD by a group called "elle melle" called "ut i år". I love it sooo much! As a student of Swedish I can pick out most of the meaning of the lyrics, even though they sing in a certain west Norwegian slang.

One song in particular, "forbi" struck me as especially sorrowful and beautiful.

Need a little help though with the sense of the last verse:

"Så lang en barndom e for barnesyn
Som en evighed av tid.
Men brått går sole ner bag siste bryn.
Og dagen e forbi.

Så va du der. Og alt falt heilt på plass:
Evig din og evig mi.
Men kjaerlighedens verden e av glass.
Og så var du forbi.

Å, alle desse öyeblikk som falt
rett til jord som spel av tid!
Kem såg at desse öyeblikk va alt?
Og så e du forbi.

Toget rolle videre. Det fylle blindt sitt spor.
Sporet e en aen form for sti
trödd av tusen slidara
. Rytmen e et ord
- om og omigjen -: "Forbi"

"The train rolls on. It blindly fulfills its track.
The track is another form of step? believed by a thousand slidera?. The rhythm is a [single] word - over and over again -: "Forbi" = past/over.

Based on the name "elle melle" = a childrens' "choosing" song, I have to wonder, if there is some children's song or rhyme that people generally know that references the sound of a train making the sound "forbi, forbi, forbi, forbi" as it rushes past? For me, it is such a cool concept and analogy to life rushing past.

What are "slidera"? What is the correct Norwegian word? Please provide a better translation, if you can explain it better.

Thanks!

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-10-13, 23:45
by EinarJ
It took me a minute, then I realized that the word i probably "slitere", of the top of my head I can't provide a good translation, but "slitsomt" is "exhausting", and I see that "to toil" is "å slite", and I'd say in this context it probably means "The track is a different path, created by thousands of people that have toiled [there]". Note that "trødd", is not at all related to "tro", but to "trå", as in "step" (see "walk", not "stair"). I can't fit that into the english translation in a good way, but the point is that it was created through people that toiled away, thus walking a lot back and forth, their steps creating the path. (To be honest though, that is a way too literal explanation compared to what the song is trying to say, but perhaps the meaning gets clearer through just that kind of translation).

A (semi-literal) translation of the song in it's entirety would be:
How long a childhood is through children's eyes
Like an eternity of time.
But suddenly the sun sets behind the last [bryn] (Not sure what they meant here)
And the day is past.

Then you came, and all the pieces fell into place.
Forever yours, and forever mine.
But the world of love is made of glass.
And then you were past.

Oh, all those moments that fell
straight to earth like time spilled.
Who saw that these moments were all of it.
Then you are past. (Looks like the implication is the person itself here, not the love from the last verse)

The train rolls on, blindly following it's track.
The track is a different kind of path, created through
the toil of thousands of feet before.
The rhythm is a word, repeated again and again: "Bygone" (Or literally "it's over/gone", I chose to use "past" in the previous verses, but the point here is the repeated verse-endings, a third translation would be "a thing of the past").

As for the title, I'd guess at it being a reference to how the rhyme ends with "du er ute", for every round of it, which definitely connects with the theme of "being something left behind".

Hope this helps.

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-10-27, 9:28
by Palabriscious
Hei alle sammen! :D

Jeg har et lite spørsmål.

So, as I have learned Swedish, I learned about plurala verformer (such as vi äro instead of vi är, and vi fingo instead of vi får) which existed quite long in the language. How was the situation in Norwegian? Did they loose their plural forms earlier and what did they look like?

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-11-04, 22:44
by EinarJ
Covered a bit in the first question here: http://www.sprakradet.no/Toppmeny/Publikasjoner/Spraaknytt/Spraknytt-32012/Lesarsporsmal/

The question refers to the example «Vi ere en Nation, vi med» from a song you can find the lyrics to here: http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vi_ere_en_Nation,_vi_med. The song's first line provides an example of the plural verb form, and the answer from Språkrådet makes it clear that they were going away/gone between 1860-1880. Note that the song was published in 1841 (see Wikipedia)

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-11-05, 6:24
by TeneReef
The plural verb form was not even included in Nynorsk which means it had already been obsolete by the time Aasen studied the dialects.

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-11-07, 19:10
by Palabriscious


Thanks for the link! I found especially this paragraph very interesting:

Flertallsbøyning av verb er også noe brukt i norske dialekter i dag, for eksempel i Hallingdal: «ho er – me era»


So on the one hand plural forms of verbs died already a long time ago, on the other hand they are still preserved in some dialects. :)

Re: NORWEGIAN DISCUSSION // Norskdrøfting

Posted: 2014-11-08, 18:57
by EinarJ
Well, given the variety in the dialects, stuff like that isn't uncommon. For instance dative is dead in written language, and has been that way for quite a while, but certain dialects still retain that too (including mine if I spoke it consistently).