Polish - dorenda

User avatar
dorenda
Posts: 2896
Joined: 2004-11-17, 23:02
Real Name: Dorenda
Gender: female
Country: PL Poland (Polska)
Contact:

Polish - dorenda

Postby dorenda » 2008-09-23, 15:25

Today I made my first translation into Polish. :) The weather reminded me of the fact that it really is autumn now, and this reminded me of this story, which I thought would be nice to translate. It's from a (here) very popular series of stories for preschoolers, called "Jip en Janneke", but in Polish they are called "Julek i Julka".
Corrections and comments are welcome. :)

-----------------------------------------

Lato umarło

- Idę do piaskownicy - woła Julka.
- Nie - mówi mama Julki. - Nie idź do piaskownicy. Padał. Piasek jest mokry. I staje się za zimno. Jest jesień.
- To będziemy grać na skwerze - mówi Julek.
Oto Julek i Julka idą do skweru. Grają z ładnymi złotymi listkami, jakie tam leżą. I siadają na ławce, obok dwóch dziadków.
- Tak - mówi jeden dziadek - lato umarło.
To dziwi Julka. Kiedy on z Julką idę do domu, mówi: - Czy to może być prawdą? To o lacie?
- Nie wiem - mówi Julka.
Julek pyta tatę. - Tato - mówi - mówią, że lato umarło.
Tata patrze na Julka. I Julek wygląda takim wystraszonym. Naprawdę przeląkł.
- Nie bój się - mówi tata. - Ludzie zawsze tak mówią jesienią. Mają na myśli, że lato skończyło się i że przyjdzie zima.
- Ale ten pan naprawdę rzekł “umarło” - mówi Julek.
- Ale - mówi tata - w przyszłym roku lato wróci. Przecież nie może być martwym.
- Nie - mówi Julek - masz racię. To może lato tylko zemdlało?
- Chyba tak - mówi tata. - Stańmy na tym.
нехай мій гаманець порожній
моя дорога невідома
я стану вільним, подорожнім
найголовніше вийти з дому

User avatar
BezierCurve
Posts: 2626
Joined: 2008-03-07, 12:21

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby BezierCurve » 2008-09-23, 16:02

Lato umarło ("umarło" sounds very dramatic - or poetic - here :) "minęło", "skończyło się" are usual verbs in this context. But then the whole story wouldn't make much sense :)

- Idę do piaskownicy - woła Julka.
- Nie - mówi mama Julki. - Nie idź do piaskownicy. Padało. Piasek jest mokry i robi się za zimno. Jest jesień.
- To będziemy bawić się na skwerze - mówi Julek.
Oto Julek i Julka idą na skwer. Bawią się ładnymi złotymi listkami, które tam leżą i siadają na ławce, obok dwóch dziadków.
- Tak - mówi jeden dziadek - lato umarło.
To dziwi Julka. Kiedy idzie z Julką do domu, mówi: - Czy to może być prawdą? To o lecie?
- Nie wiem - mówi Julka.
Julek pyta tatę. - Tato - mówi - mówią, że lato umarło.
Tata patrzy na Julka i Julek wygląda na wystraszonego. Naprawdę się przeląkł.
- Nie bój się - mówi tata. - Ludzie zawsze tak mówią jesienią. Mają na myśli to, że lato skończyło się i że przyjdzie zima.
- Ale ten pan naprawdę powiedział “umarło” - mówi Julek.
- Ale - mówi tata - w przyszłym roku lato wróci. Przecież nie może być martwe.
- Nie - mówi Julek - masz racię. To może lato tylko zemdlało?
- Chyba tak - mówi tata. - Zostańmy przy tym.

Very well done!

padało - when referring to the weather, it's usually neuter gender;
i - try to avoid beginning sentences with "i". It's not an error though, it's just the elegance;
staje / robi się - again, in this context you'd rather hear "robi się", although "staje się" would be perfectly understood;
na skwer/do skweru - the rules when to apply which are complicated. Shortly: when you mean a big, open area (plac, targ, pustynia etc.) - use "na" with the noun in accusative;
grać / bawić się - "grać" usually refers to a game with a set of rules (chess, soccer). If you play with blocks / dolls / leaves - it's "bawić się".
jakie / które - some people would use "jakie" in colloquial speech here, but the correct one is "które";
idzie - if you talk about the subject mentioned in the former sentence, you usually leave it out:
Julek znalazł zabawkę. Bawi się nią cały czas. (not: On bawi się nią cały czas);
lecie - irregular declination: lato, lata, latu, lato, latem, lecie, lato!
wyglądać na... (+ accusative)
przeląkł się - reflexive verb
rzekł / powiedział - you wouldn't hear a kid say "rzekł", nowadays it's used only in books.
martwe / martwym - you use instrumental with nouns (on jest elektrykiem). The adjectives don't follow that rule (on jest zielony).

Those were minor issues. You got right most of it :good4u:

edit: accusative, not genitive.
Last edited by BezierCurve on 2008-09-23, 16:17, edited 1 time in total.
Brejkam wszystkie rule.

"I love tautologies, they're so ... tautological." Hunef

User avatar
BezierCurve
Posts: 2626
Joined: 2008-03-07, 12:21

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby BezierCurve » 2008-09-23, 16:13

martwe / martwym - you use instrumental with nouns (on jest elektrykiem). The adjectives don't follow that rule (on jest zielony).


I meant unless there's a noun attached...

On jest zielonym elektrykiem.
(doesn't make much sense, but grammatically it's flawless :) )
Brejkam wszystkie rule.

"I love tautologies, they're so ... tautological." Hunef

User avatar
arti
Posts: 690
Joined: 2004-09-11, 22:51
Real Name: Artur Kopcych
Gender: male
Location: Kraków
Country: PL Poland (Polska)
Contact:

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby arti » 2008-09-23, 16:30

I've just realized that I have never used "skwer" in my entire life :lol:
Don't you think it is rather too old? I made a small reconnaissance and I asked my two friends if they use it. They denied.
The stock market is the only place where dreams can grow.

User avatar
pittmirg
Posts: 737
Joined: 2008-06-11, 7:37
Gender: male
Country: PL Poland (Polska)

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby pittmirg » 2008-09-23, 18:44

:hmm: Perhaps "odeszło" would allow us to preserve the original pun in that text, as the verb is often used as an euphemism instead of "umrzeć". Certainly, it's not perfect.

They say: traduttore, traditore :roll:

BezierCurve wrote:jakie / które - some people would use "jakie" in colloquial speech here, but the correct one is "które";


Mhm, informally, I'd probably use "co" (bawią się ładnymi listkami, co tam leżą). But które looks good in a written text.

On jest zielonym elektrykiem.


It made me think of Colorless green ideas sleep furiously. Even the color is the same.

Admit that you're influenced by Chomsky, don't be shy. Eh? ;)

BTW, there are some constructions where I might use a predicative adjective in the instrumental (cf. sentences like "Chciałby zacząć być doceniany(m)", "można być starym i zdrowym"), when the copula is transformed into the infinitive. It usually seems more or less optional in such sentences, but the second sentence with the impersonal verb would sound quite weird to me if the adjectives were in the nominative...

User avatar
Qrczak
Posts: 154
Joined: 2007-11-27, 20:51
Real Name: Marcin Kowalczyk
Gender: male
Location: Kraków
Country: CH Switzerland (Schweiz / Suisse / Svizzera / Svizra)

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby Qrczak » 2008-09-23, 19:09

BezierCurve wrote:Bawią się ładnymi złotymi listkami, które tam leżą, i siadają na ławce obok dwóch dziadków.

The first marked comma is mandatory. It is a common error to forget closing a subclause with a comma.

The second marked comma should better be skipped, although I think it could be argued to be correct with that comma.

BezierCurve wrote:Mają na myśli to, że lato się skończyło się i że przyjdzie zima

Both word orders are correct, but it is slightly better to avoid się at the end (or beginning) of a subclause.

User avatar
BezierCurve
Posts: 2626
Joined: 2008-03-07, 12:21

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby BezierCurve » 2008-09-23, 19:24

Admit that you're influenced by Chomsky, don't be shy. Eh?


I don't think so. It's been 10 years since I read his books :)
However, I admit that I can still remember some bits of it.
Brejkam wszystkie rule.

"I love tautologies, they're so ... tautological." Hunef

User avatar
dorenda
Posts: 2896
Joined: 2004-11-17, 23:02
Real Name: Dorenda
Gender: female
Country: PL Poland (Polska)
Contact:

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby dorenda » 2008-09-23, 20:02

Thanks, everyone!

BezierCurve wrote:Lato umarło ("umarło" sounds very dramatic - or poetic - here :) "minęło", "skończyło się" are usual verbs in this context. But then the whole story wouldn't make much sense :)
pittmirg wrote::hmm: Perhaps "odeszło" would allow us to preserve the original pun in that text, as the verb is often used as an euphemism instead of "umrzeć". Certainly, it's not perfect.
If "umarło" really sounds too dramatic, that would be a possibility, although Julek probably wouldn't have been shocked that much from hearing this. In Dutch this phrase also sounds quite dramatic and unusual, though, so if it also does so in Polish, that's good. :)
It'd be interesting to know which word they used in the official translation, but I can't find it.

arti wrote:I've just realized that I have never used "skwer" in my entire life :lol:
Don't you think it is rather too old? I made a small reconnaissance and I asked my two friends if they use it. They denied.
The story is from the '60's, so maybe then the word does fit? ;) What would you suggest translating "plantsoen" with, then?
нехай мій гаманець порожній
моя дорога невідома
я стану вільним, подорожнім
найголовніше вийти з дому

User avatar
arti
Posts: 690
Joined: 2004-09-11, 22:51
Real Name: Artur Kopcych
Gender: male
Location: Kraków
Country: PL Poland (Polska)
Contact:

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby arti » 2008-09-23, 21:15

dorenda wrote:The story is from the '60's, so maybe then the word does fit? ;) What would you suggest translating "plantsoen" with, then?

Probably I would use just "park" or "plac" (depends on how the place looks like). Don't understand me wrong, "skwer" is a correct word, I just don't use it and I've never heard anyone of my family using it. But maybe it is only my subjective feeling :)
The stock market is the only place where dreams can grow.

User avatar
Qrczak
Posts: 154
Joined: 2007-11-27, 20:51
Real Name: Marcin Kowalczyk
Gender: male
Location: Kraków
Country: CH Switzerland (Schweiz / Suisse / Svizzera / Svizra)

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby Qrczak » 2008-09-23, 21:32

It indeed seems to become a little archaic. But I used it a few times (I’m 31) in the phrase “różne parki i skwerki”, describing what can be found on one of my favorite walking routes.

User avatar
BezierCurve
Posts: 2626
Joined: 2008-03-07, 12:21

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby BezierCurve » 2008-09-24, 12:17

“różne parki i skwerki”


Although very rarely, I still use that word - in its diminutive form, like Qrczak. Must be typical of people in their thirties. :mrgreen:
Brejkam wszystkie rule.

"I love tautologies, they're so ... tautological." Hunef

User avatar
dorenda
Posts: 2896
Joined: 2004-11-17, 23:02
Real Name: Dorenda
Gender: female
Country: PL Poland (Polska)
Contact:

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby dorenda » 2008-12-29, 23:47

I did another translation, of a story from the same series (I didn't feel like searching for a long time for a story that is not too long and not too difficult :)).
And again I'd be glad with any corrections.

(I already changed more than half of the sentences that started with "and" in the original so as to have them start with a different word. ;))

-----------------------------------------

Sylwester

Na zewnątrz jest ciemno i bardzo zimno. Jest późno w nocy. Julek leży w łóżku. Śpi.
Ale nagle: bum, bum, tuu, tuu! Bum! Co to jest? Julek się budzi. Siądzie się prosto w łóżeczku i bardzo się boji, bo jest taki odgłos. Wystrzeliwają. W dali on słyszy statek. I jeszcze statek. I na ulicy słyszy piszczenie. Coż to jest? A wtedy nagle Julek znów pamienta. Jest sylwester! Na dole są tata i mama i ciotka. Świętują sylwester. On słyszy, jak oni się śmieją.
Julek wstaje z łóżka i cicho schodzi po schodach. Idzie przez korytarz i cichutko otwiera drzwi. Drzwi do pokoju dziennego. Zobacz, tam tata stoji, z kieliszkiem w ręce. I mama też. I ciotka też. Julka nie widzą. On wchodzi do pokoju.
A wtedy tata go widzi. Mówi: – Zobacz, kto tam jest. Co tu robisz, łobuziaku?
A mama go całuje i mówi: – Szczęśliwego nowego roku, Julku.
– Ja też chcę kieliszek z czymś – mówi Julek.
– Ty zostajesz jabłko w cieście – mówi ciotka. – Szybko siądź mi na kolanach. Możesz słuchać radia na chwileczkę.
Julek jest bardzo senny, ale mu tak przyjemnie. Je swoje jabłko w cieście maleńkimi kęsami i słyszy ładną muzykę.
– Teraz pójdę się bawić ze swoim samochodem – mówi Julek.
Ale tata mówi: – Nie Julku, już dość. Teraz sprowadzę cię do łóżka.
Julek natychmiast znów zasypia. A następnego ranka przychodzi Julka.
– Szczęśliwego nowego roku – mówi ona.
– Szczęśliwego nowego roku – mówi Julek. – Ja dzisiaj nocą siedziałem do póżna.
– Nie prawda – mówi Julka.
– Tak – mówi Julek. – Nie położyłem się do dwunastej.
– Kłamiesz – mówi Julka.
– Nie kłamię – mówi Julek.
Ale mama mówi: – Julek kłał się spać o siódmej, jak zwykle. A o dwunastej był na dole. Na bardzo krótko. Prawda, Julku?
– Tak – mówi Julek. – I jadłem jabłko w cieście. I słyszałem huki.
A Julka jest zazdrosna, bo ona spała. Całą noc. I żadnego huku nie słyszała.
– To niesprawiedliwe – mówi ona. – Też chcę słyszeć huki.
A mama Julka mówi: – Zostawiłam ci jabłko w cieście, Julko. I nie bądź smutna. W życie jeszcze dość huków usłyszysz.
нехай мій гаманець порожній
моя дорога невідома
я стану вільним, подорожнім
найголовніше вийти з дому

User avatar
pittmirg
Posts: 737
Joined: 2008-06-11, 7:37
Gender: male
Country: PL Poland (Polska)

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby pittmirg » 2008-12-30, 12:53

Siądzie się prosto w łóżeczku i bardzo się boji, bo jest taki odgłos

Siada prosto w łóżeczku i bardzo się boi, bo jest taki hałas. (albo ewentualnie: bo słyszy ten odgłos).

I'm glad that you're interested in improving our degenerated orthography, by getting rid of the idiotic <i> for /ji/, but unfortunately the spelling <boi>, <stoi> is still mandatory.

Wystrzeliwają.


I'd use: Strzelają. or Ktoś strzela or Słychać wystrzały.

And conjugating the verb wystrzeliwać like wystrzeliwam, wystrzeliwasz... wystrzeliwają is rather obsolete or at least old-fashioned, wystrzeliwuję, wystrzeliwujesz... wystrzeliwują are much more normal. Anyway, this verb doesn't sound right in this particular context, it seems too specific.

W dali on słyszy statek. I jeszcze inny statek.


Or i kolejny statek.

A wtedy nagle Julek znów pamięta.


Przypomina sobie would sound better IMO.

Jest sylwester! Na dole są tata i mama i ciotka. Świętują sylwestra. On słyszy, jak oni się śmieją.


Świętują sylwestra is more natural. It's one of the semantically inanimate nouns that behave like the animate ones grammatically.

A wtedy tata go widzi.


Zauważa or dostrzega.

– Teraz pójdę się bawić ze swoim samochodem – mówi Julek.


Samochód isn't a person (or even an animal). Therefore, można się tylko bawić nim.

Ale tata mówi: – Nie Julku, już dość. Teraz zaprowadzę cię do łóżka.


– Szczęśliwego nowego roku – mówi ona.
– Szczęśliwego nowego roku – mówi Julek. – Ja dzisiaj nocą siedziałem do póżna.
Nieprawda – mówi Julka.


Nieprawda is written as one word, don't ask why. :)

Ale mama mówi: – Julek kładł się spać o siódmej, jak zwykle.


Aha, and I'm not sure if the vocatives like Julku and Julko are all that natural, I suspect that most people would simply make use of nominatives in everyday speech, in case of names. I don't mean that these would sound very bad, though.

User avatar
BezierCurve
Posts: 2626
Joined: 2008-03-07, 12:21

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby BezierCurve » 2008-12-30, 13:19

Świętują sylwestra is more natural. It's one of the semantically inanimate nouns that behave like the animate ones grammatically.


Good point. "Sylwester" is the namesday of all people named so (which happened to be 31st of December), hence the association with animate form I suppose.

– Ty dostajesz jabłko w cieście – mówi ciotka.


Just a small typo. Well done :D
Brejkam wszystkie rule.

"I love tautologies, they're so ... tautological." Hunef

User avatar
dorenda
Posts: 2896
Joined: 2004-11-17, 23:02
Real Name: Dorenda
Gender: female
Country: PL Poland (Polska)
Contact:

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby dorenda » 2008-12-30, 20:39

pittmirg wrote:I'm glad that you're interested in improving our degenerated orthography, by getting rid of the idiotic <i> for /ji/, but unfortunately the spelling <boi>, <stoi> is still mandatory.
:lol:
Thanks a lot for your corrections.

I think I can try something a bit more complicated next time. :)
нехай мій гаманець порожній
моя дорога невідома
я стану вільним, подорожнім
найголовніше вийти з дому

User avatar
Sean of the Dead
Posts: 3884
Joined: 2008-10-11, 17:51
Real Name: Sean Jorgenson
Gender: male
Location: Kent
Country: US United States (United States)

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby Sean of the Dead » 2009-03-03, 6:21

BezierCurve wrote:lecie - irregular declination: lato, lata, latu, lato, latem, lecie, lato!


Don't mean to steal your thread Dory, but does anyone know of a site that tells you stuff like that?
Something like Canoo, except for Polish. :whistle:

:blush:
Main focuses: [flag]kw[/flag] [flag]he[/flag]
Sub focus: Plautdietsch
On my own: [flag]is[/flag]

User avatar
dorenda
Posts: 2896
Joined: 2004-11-17, 23:02
Real Name: Dorenda
Gender: female
Country: PL Poland (Polska)
Contact:

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby dorenda » 2009-03-03, 9:53

Actually, if I'm not mistaken, these are just regular vowel changes. An a often (or always?) changes to e when the hard consonant following it is softened. Something like that. And I don't know of a website that tells you that, cause I got it from a book. :)
нехай мій гаманець порожній
моя дорога невідома
я стану вільним, подорожнім
найголовніше вийти з дому

User avatar
Qrczak
Posts: 154
Joined: 2007-11-27, 20:51
Real Name: Marcin Kowalczyk
Gender: male
Location: Kraków
Country: CH Switzerland (Schweiz / Suisse / Svizzera / Svizra)

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby Qrczak » 2009-03-03, 14:03


User avatar
pittmirg
Posts: 737
Joined: 2008-06-11, 7:37
Gender: male
Country: PL Poland (Polska)

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby pittmirg » 2009-03-03, 15:27

dorenda wrote:An a often (or always?) changes to e when the hard consonant following it is softened. Something like that.


If it has developed from Common Slavic *ě (cf. brat : bracie). Though it's been somewhat remodelled by analogy, thus some reflexes of *ě don't alternate and some reflexes of a former *a do. But by and large, when some /a/ corresponds to Russian е/ё, it will change into /ɛ/ when the following consonant is "softened". There's also a similar phenomenon involving /ɔ/.
Śnieg, zawierucha w nas

User avatar
voron
Language Forum Moderator
Posts: 4921
Joined: 2007-07-15, 3:29
Real Name: Igor
Gender: male
Country: TR Turkey (Türkiye)

Re: Polish - dorenda

Postby voron » 2009-03-03, 19:39

pittmirg wrote: Though it's been somewhat remodelled by analogy, thus some reflexes of *ě don't alternate and some reflexes of a former *a do.


Can you give examples of both? They should look exotic (especially the one with alternating former *a). :shock:


Return to “Polish (Polski)”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron