Which language is most similar to Italian?

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Koko

Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby Koko » 2014-06-06, 6:13

I read somewhere that Neapolitan has avè meaning to have. Would this then be used only as the Colima rather than in reference to physical possession?

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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby ~jakip » 2014-06-06, 8:43

Koko wrote:I read somewhere that Neapolitan has avè meaning to have. Would this then be used only as the Colima rather than in reference to physical possession?

Also in Milanese avè means to have but only as auxiliar, if you want to mean a possesion you have to put "ghe" (gh'hoo, gh'hee(t), gh'haa, ...).
That's not an answer, just a curiosity ;)
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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby Saim » 2014-06-06, 9:18

Is ghe a pronoun? Like Italian ci, French y, Catalan hi...

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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby ~jakip » 2014-06-06, 11:39

Yes, it's a pronoun. It's used as well as state in place (gh'è, gh'era, ... that correspond to c'è, c'era, ... in Italian).
It's incredible how it influenced the Milan's Italian speaker because they say "c'ho" (gh'hoo) to say "I have" which is wrong in Italian, but right in Milanese.
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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby OldBoring » 2014-06-06, 11:58

~jakip wrote:It's incredible how it influenced the Milan's Italian speaker because they say "c'ho" (gh'hoo) to say "I have" which is wrong in Italian, but right in Milanese.

We also say that in Rome, both in Romanesco and in the local Italian. :D

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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby IpseDixit » 2014-06-06, 14:24

It's incredible how it influenced the Milan's Italian speaker because they say "c'ho" (gh'hoo) to say "I have" which is wrong in Italian, but right in Milanese.


It's used in Florence too.

Koko

Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby Koko » 2014-06-06, 22:18

How would "c'ho" be pronounced? As normal? Or does it sound like "cio?"

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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby ~jakip » 2014-06-07, 4:59

Koko wrote:How would "c'ho" be pronounced? As normal? Or does it sound like "cio?"

It sounds like the word "ciò".

P.S. for Koko: don't use it in the written texts, NEVER! :yep:
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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby OldBoring » 2014-06-07, 5:17

That's why pedantic people say that it's wrong to write "c'ho", that we should write "ci ho" or "ciò"...

Koko

Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby Koko » 2014-06-07, 6:46

~jakip wrote:
Koko wrote:How would "c'ho" be pronounced? As normal? Or does it sound like "cio?"

It sounds like the word "ciò".

P.S. for Koko: don't use it in the written texts, NEVER! :yep:

Haha, grazie per il consiglio. It would take me forever to be able to use it anyways: it seems like a coloquialism, and I tend to steer away from those even with my friends ^^

BTW: I've been wondering if it has been okay for me to use -i with you, jakip. Especially since that's what I used since forever rather than formal -a.


I kind of agree with Youngfun; it would certainly clear up confusion for a lot of people. It's not my place to change it (c'ho looks much better anyways) but I'd suggest ci'ho because then it sounds more like one word rather than ci ho.

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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby ~jakip » 2014-06-07, 14:59

Koko wrote:BTW: I've been wondering if it has been okay for me to use -i with you, jakip. Especially since that's what I used since forever rather than formal -a.

Use the informal one, since I'm not an important person or a foreign (or yes? Ahah) ;)

By the way the answer to the thread's title is: "Spanish". It could seem I'm one of the people who says that just because everybody thinks that, but I can't find anything as closer to Italian as Spanish.
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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby ~jakip » 2014-06-07, 14:59

Koko wrote:BTW: I've been wondering if it has been okay for me to use -i with you, jakip. Especially since that's what I used since forever rather than formal -a.

Use the informal one, since I'm not an important person or a foreign (or yes? Ahah) ;)

By the way the answer to the thread's title is: "Spanish". It could seem I'm one of the people who says that just because everybody thinks that, but I can't find anything as closer to Italian as Spanish.
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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby Itikar » 2014-06-10, 10:24

Youngfun wrote:That's why pedantic people say that it's wrong to write "c'ho", that we should write "ci ho" or "ciò"...

I feel somewhat mentioned. :para:

Anyway "c'ho" is the elision of "che ho". I use it sometimes to reproduce the elision of the relative pronoun "che" that I do sometimes in the spoken.

Quello che ho fatto → Quello c'ho fatto
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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby TeneReef » 2014-06-10, 15:38

Corsican is most similar to Italian.
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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby IpseDixit » 2014-06-10, 15:39

TeneReef wrote:Corsican is most similar to Italian.


Maybe you should read the entire question :)

Spanish, French, or Portuguese? Which one is most similar to Italian?

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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby Massimiliano B » 2014-06-12, 21:36

French!

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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby Chrisgarcia345 » 2020-12-12, 8:46

IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote:(es) El mundo es un libro y quién no viaja lee sólo una página de él.
(it) Il mondo è un libro e chi non viaggia ne legge solo una pagina.
(fr) Le monde est un livre et ceux qui ne voyagent pas n’en lisent qu’une seule page.


Has cherry picking ever proven anything?

Anyway, to me the French version seems closer, especially in the second part, both Italian and French use the partitive particle en/ne whilst Spanish uses a construction (de él) which would be quite clunky in Italian.

Moreover the Italian sentence in quite arbitrarily chosen, for example this version (which is the actual translation of the French one) is even closer:

(it) Il mondo è un libro e coloro che non viaggiano non ne leggono che una sola pagina.


I am fluent in spanish. I have dabbled with French and Italian. This my friend is not cherry picking. Italian is at many times understandable to a Spanish speaker. While French, if one is not familiar, is not

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Re: Which language is most similar to Italian?

Postby oho » 2020-12-12, 11:28

Chrisgarcia345 wrote:
IpseDixit wrote:
linguoboy wrote:(es) El mundo es un libro y quién no viaja lee sólo una página de él.
(it) Il mondo è un libro e chi non viaggia ne legge solo una pagina.
(fr) Le monde est un livre et ceux qui ne voyagent pas n’en lisent qu’une seule page.


Has cherry picking ever proven anything?

Anyway, to me the French version seems closer, especially in the second part, both Italian and French use the partitive particle en/ne whilst Spanish uses a construction (de él) which would be quite clunky in Italian.

Moreover the Italian sentence in quite arbitrarily chosen, for example this version (which is the actual translation of the French one) is even closer:

(it) Il mondo è un libro e coloro che non viaggiano non ne leggono che una sola pagina.


I am fluent in spanish. I have dabbled with French and Italian. This my friend is not cherry picking. Italian is at many times understandable to a Spanish speaker. While French, if one is not familiar, is not


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