untranslatable italian words

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rykketid
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Re: untranslatable italian words

Postby rykketid » 2012-02-02, 13:49

KingHarvest wrote:How is "maybe" an untranslatable idea? How would you even draw "maybe?"


Magari has a far wider range of meanings... magari, understood as "maybe", is like the 10% of the actual meaning of "magari"...

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rykketid
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Re: untranslatable italian words

Postby rykketid » 2012-02-02, 14:05

elkalb wrote:
Nada 2009 wrote:figuriamoci?



Ma, e' facile : "Let's pretend" or "Let's imagine"


Actually, figuriamoci is used to say "basing on one's experience/knowing how things "works", it could have not been otherwise" or also <<basing on one's experience/knowing how things "works", it was obvious>> (usually characterized by a sad/angry/ironic nuance) for instance:

<<Ha detto che non ci sarà alla sua festa>>

<<Figuriamoci...>>

<<He/she said he/she wouldn't come to your party>>

<<[see translations above]>>... basically it means that that person is used not coming to your parties, so that, by now, it is obvious that he/she wouldn't come; but you keep inviting him/her each time you have a party just out of politeness...

Gosh, it is sooo hard! :-D

---

Whereas "let's pretend" is translated as "facciamo finta che..." and sometimes also as "supponiamo che...."

let's imagine---> immaginiamo che...

---

Hope you'll find it useful!

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lingasms
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Re: untranslatable italian words

Postby lingasms » 2012-02-02, 19:44

rykketid wrote:Actually, figuriamoci is used to say "basing on one's experience/knowing how things "works", it could have not been otherwise" or also <<basing on one's experience/knowing how things "works", it was obvious>> (usually characterized by a sad/angry/ironic nuance) for instance:

<<Ha detto che non ci sarà alla sua festa>>

<<Figuriamoci...>>

<<He/she said he/she wouldn't come to your party>>

<<[see translations above]>>... basically it means that that person is used not coming to your parties, so that, by now, it is obvious that he/she wouldn't come; but you keep inviting him/her each time you have a party just out of politeness...

Gosh, it is sooo hard! :-D


It's very ambiguous. If I heard this conversation, I wouldn't understand "figuriamoci" as you said. I would understand a "I don't believe it when he/she says he/she won't come, I personally think that he/she will eventually show up at the party, you know how he/she is"

So, yeah. Not that easy :D
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rykketid
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Re: untranslatable italian words

Postby rykketid » 2012-02-02, 19:59

Babooshkerin wrote:
rykketid wrote:Actually, figuriamoci is used to say "basing on one's experience/knowing how things "works", it could have not been otherwise" or also <<basing on one's experience/knowing how things "works", it was obvious>> (usually characterized by a sad/angry/ironic nuance) for instance:

<<Ha detto che non ci sarà alla sua festa>>

<<Figuriamoci...>>

<<He/she said he/she wouldn't come to your party>>

<<[see translations above]>>... basically it means that that person is used not coming to your parties, so that, by now, it is obvious that he/she wouldn't come; but you keep inviting him/her each time you have a party just out of politeness...

Gosh, it is sooo hard! :-D


It's very ambiguous. If I heard this conversation, I wouldn't understand "figuriamoci" as you said. I would understand a "I don't believe it when he/she says he/she won't come, I personally think that he/she will eventually show up at the party, you know how he/she is"

So, yeah. Not that easy :D


That's true... it also stands for the exact opposite! D-:

AnonimoConNome
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Re: untranslatable italian words

Postby AnonimoConNome » 2012-07-08, 13:16

In italian it is not about what you say, but about how you say it :lol:
Å=alt+143, å=alt+134
Æ=alt+146, æ=alt+145,
Ø=alt+0216, ø=alt+0248

Vær så god ;)

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globetrottersara
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Re: untranslatable italian words

Postby globetrottersara » 2012-07-08, 16:41

I found this link on Magari:

http://www.etimo.it/?term=magari

I would translate it with "if only".


AnonimoConNome wrote:In italian it is not about what you say, but about how you say it :lol:


Grandioso! :D
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Re: untranslatable italian words

Postby AnonimoConNome » 2012-07-09, 11:24

Another expression that doesn't really have any translation is maybe: "ti voglio bene". I mean, I know they say "I love you", but in Italian "Ti amo" and "Ti voglio bene" have completely different meanings.


Un'alta espressione che non può realmente essere tradotta è forse: ti voglio bene. Voglio dire, so che dicono "I love you", ma in italiano "ti amo" e "ti voglio bene" hanno due significati completamente diversi.
Å=alt+143, å=alt+134
Æ=alt+146, æ=alt+145,
Ø=alt+0216, ø=alt+0248

Vær så god ;)

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Re: untranslatable italian words

Postby TeneReef » 2012-09-24, 16:47

Italian vs Brazilian Portuguese

Ti voglio bene = Te quero bem
Ti amo /T'amo= Te amo / Amo você
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Bernard
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Re: untranslatable italian words

Postby Bernard » 2012-09-30, 8:23

Italian <> German

Ti voglio bene <> Ich habe dich gern.
Ti amo <> Ich liebe dich.


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