Estonian language

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davisma1984

Estonian language

Postby davisma1984 » 2003-02-06, 3:42

I'm considering learning some Estonian. Is their anyone interested or know this language that could help me begin? Does anyone know of any good websites that teach some basics? Thanks for any help.

jordi garrigos
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Postby jordi garrigos » 2003-02-06, 8:28

I am also interested in learning Estonian. In fact I love languages from the Uralic-altaic family. I know Turkish and a bit of Finnish. Estonian is quite similar to Finnish, if you know one of these languages you can perfectly understand the other. Languages from the Uralic-Altaic family (Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Turkish) all use vocal harmony. For example:

Estonian: paar (couple), paarid (couples).

Also common to all languages in this family is aglutination and long-word compounds. For example:

Estonian: all-maaraud-tee-jaam (underground station)

I use the book Colloquial Estonian by Routledge with the corresponding audiotapes. The only website I know to learn some basics of Estonian is "Timm's Estonian Page" with audio: http://www.cusd.claremont.edu/~tkroll/eesti.html

I hope that helps!

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Axystos
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Postby Axystos » 2003-02-06, 12:07

How about starting with 1-10 in Estonian?

1 üks
2 kaks
3 kolm
4 neli
5 viis
6 kuus
7 seitse
8 kaheksa
9 üheksa
10 kümme

*learned that in Norway, 2,5 years ago, and still knows it* :D
Axystos.
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davisma1984

Postby davisma1984 » 2003-02-06, 16:30

jordi garrigos, i have a couple of questions you might be able to answer. Why are there two forms for the personal pronouns and how do you pronounce the vowels. I read that they have three degrees (?).

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Luís
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Postby Luís » 2003-02-06, 16:39

Compared with Finnish :-)

1 üks / yksi
2 kaks / kaksi
3 kolm / kolme
4 neli /neljä
5 viis /viisi
6 kuus / kuusi
7 seitse /seitsemän
8 kaheksa / kahdeksan
9 üheksa / yhdeksän
10 kümme / kymmenen

y = ü

You haver very good memory, Axystos :-)
Quot linguas calles, tot homines vales

froggie

Postby froggie » 2003-02-07, 14:09

and in finalnd nobody used the "whole" numbers, so you will hear

yks
kaks
kol
viis
kuus
seitsemän
kaheksan
yheksan
kyt
:))) even more similar to finnish. When I was in Tallin I could understand a whole lot. It is like swedish and danish...
froggie

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Liisi
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Postby Liisi » 2005-04-01, 20:52

froggie wrote:and in finalnd nobody used the "whole" numbers, so you will hear

yks
kaks
kol
viis
kuus
seitsemän
kaheksan
yheksan
kyt


There are some mistakes here, I correct them in case someone studying Finnish reads this :).

yks
kaks
kolme
(neljä)
viis
kuus
seitsemän (or, the colloquial version: seittemän)
kaheksan
yheksän
[s]kyt[/s] kymmenen

It's not true that nobody uses the "whole" numbers. In correct written Finnish (kirjakieli) they are a must. In colloquial speech it's common to shorten the numbers (like the ones listed here), but not by everybody and not always.

Those "kol" and "kyt" can be found in numbers like kolkyt (30), but not alone.
I appreciate corrections to my mistakes in any language.

henrik2
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Postby henrik2 » 2005-04-05, 21:25

Hey,

davisma1984 wrote:jordi garrigos, i have a couple of questions you might be able to answer. Why are there two forms for the personal pronouns and how do you pronounce the vowels. I read that they have three degrees (?).

Both of these questions have already been discussed somewhat in the other topic here.
1 - the shorter forms of the personal pronouns are basically simplifications of the longer ones. For example, TEMA is shortened to TA, SINA to SA etc. They can be used to add or reduce emphasis as needed.
2 - yes, there are three different lengths, but not only with vowels, it can also apply to consonants. What makes it important is that in many cases it is just the pronounced length of the vowel or consonant that determines the meaning or case of the word (there are some examples in the referred other topic).

If you have any other more specific questions, I'll be happy to try and answer.

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Postby henrik2 » 2005-04-05, 21:33

jordi garrigos wrote:Estonian is quite similar to Finnish, if you know one of these languages you can perfectly understand the other.

I have to disagree. I'm a native Estonian speaker and it is very hard for me to understand spoken Finnish. If it's written down and I have time to think, it's a little easier. Liisi here can maybe comment on that from the other side:)

Estonian: all-maaraud-tee-jaam (underground station)

Well, this is quite an extreme example actually, it's not really that bad. Especially because this word is hardly ever used here. First, we don't have subways in Estonia and second, metroojaam is a far easier word:)
Note also that you actually spell it all together - allmaaraudteejaam - without the hyphens.

I use the book Colloquial Estonian by Routledge with the corresponding audiotapes.

How do you find this book to be? Useful? I'm using a book from the same "Colloquial..." series to study Czech. It's actually much better than I expected it to be. I haven't unfortunately seen the Estonian one though.

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Postby ShaeShae » 2005-04-15, 0:45

I read several reviews saying that the Colloquial Estonian wasn't a good book to study Estonian from, mainly because of wrong grammar structures, vocabulary, and non-native speakers... so I'm not sure if I would buy this book :?
But actually, I was thrilled to find an Estonian dictionary and phrasebook by Ksenia Benyukh... yet I heard that this one isn't too great either. :( Has anyone got this book also?
I think it would be a great idea if the native speakers could update the phrasebooks, vocabulary lists, etc. - that would be awesome for learners of Estonian language :D

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Postby E}{pugnator » 2005-04-15, 12:22

ShaeShae, why don't you get Tudalva's book instead? Try typing Tudalva at amazon . I'm not sure if it has audio, though, so you'd have to buy Colloquial because of the audio.
Learning Georgian, Mandarin Chinese, Russian and Papiamentu from scratch. Trying to brush up my Norwegian up to an advanced level.

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Estonian courses

Postby frany71 » 2005-04-18, 17:57

ShaeShae wrote:I read several reviews saying that the Colloquial Estonian wasn't a good book to study Estonian from, mainly because of wrong grammar structures, vocabulary, and non-native speakers... so I'm not sure if I would buy this book :?
But actually, I was thrilled to find an Estonian dictionary and phrasebook by Ksenia Benyukh... yet I heard that this one isn't too great either. :( Has anyone got this book also?
I think it would be a great idea if the native speakers could update the phrasebooks, vocabulary lists, etc. - that would be awesome for learners of Estonian language :D


Yes, it's right, I started with Colloquial Estonian, but it's not as good as other books of the Colloquial Series. It's somehow confusing and not well structured.
I used that book for the first months, then I found another solution: "E nagu Eesti", it's really good for beginners. I strongly recommend it if you want to acquire a solid grammar base. Dialogues are more useful than the ones in Colloquial Estonian.
I hope this helps :)
Francesco

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Mantaz
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Postby Mantaz » 2005-04-18, 22:08

Yeah, E nagu Eesti is really good. It was my first Estonian books :D

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Postby frany71 » 2005-04-19, 8:18

Tere, Mantaz!

Kas sa oled juba õpikut "Avatud uksed" kasutanud? Ma ostsin kunagi selle raamatu ja arvan, et see on ka väga huvitav.
Last edited by frany71 on 2005-04-26, 21:27, edited 1 time in total.

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Mantaz
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Postby Mantaz » 2005-04-19, 14:59

frany71 wrote:Tere, Mantaz!

Kas sa oled juba õpperaamatut "Avatud uksed" kasutanud? Ma ostsin kunagi selle raamatu ja arvan, et on ka väga huvitav.

Ei ole kasutanud, aga kuulsin, et see on väga raske ;)

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Postby henrik2 » 2005-04-20, 9:36

frany71 wrote:Kas sa oled juba õpperaamatut "Avatud uksed" kasutanud? Ma ostsin kunagi selle raamatu ja arvan, et on ka väga huvitav.

Tere, Sina oled vist seesama Francesco, kellega me MyCR foorumis juba kunagi suhtlesime?:)

Väike märkus Su postituse kohta: eesti keeles juhtub väga harva, et lause ilma aluseta (subject) hakkama saab, isegi kui tegemist on kõrvallausega. Seega õigem oleks kirjutada "... arvan, et see on ka väga huvitav".

Ja sõna "õpperaamat" (textbook, learning book) asemel kasutatakse üldiselt rohkem "õpik".

parimat
Henrik

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Postby frany71 » 2005-04-25, 23:32

Tere,

Jah, olen mina. :) Kuid selle nimega on siin palju kasutajaid ja seetõttu oli väga raske uut kasutajanime valida.
Ma lugesin Sinu postitust alles nüüd (nädal aega hiljem). Vabanda, aga vahel juhtub, et pean töötama nagu hull, seetõttu ei ole mul palju aega postitusi lugeda.
Täna kasutasin teist korda sõna "õpperaamat", sest ma ei olnud Su kirja lugenud...


Francesco
Last edited by frany71 on 2005-04-26, 21:24, edited 1 time in total.

henrik2
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Postby henrik2 » 2005-04-26, 6:38

Hei

Veidi sõnade järjekorra kohendamist:)

frany71 wrote:Kuid on palju kasutajaid selle nimega siin, ja oligi väga raske uue kasutajanime valida :)
Ma olen Sinu postitust just nüüd (pärast nädalat) lugenud. Mul on kahju, aga vahel juhtub see, et pean töötama nagu hull, seetõttu ei ole mul palju aega postitusi lugeda.
Täna kasutasin teist korda sõna "õpperaamat", sest ma ei olnud lugenud Sinu kirja...

Kuid selle nimega on siin palju kasutajaid ja seetõttu oli väga raske uut kasutajanime valida:)
Ma lugesin Sinu postitust alles nüüd (nädal aega hiljem). Mul on kahju, (Vabanda,) aga vahel juhtub, et pean töötama nagu hull, seetõttu ei ole mul palju aega postitusi lugeda.
Täna kasutasin teist korda sõna "õpperaamat", sest ma ei olnud Su kirja lugenud...


Ega see "õpperaamat" nüüd eriti suur viga ka ei ole ja kõik saavad ilmselt aru, mida Sa sellega mõtled. Vahe on ehk umbes samasugune nagu inglise keeles "textbook" asemel öelda "book for learning" - iseenesest ju õige, aga kõlab lihtsalt pisut kohmakalt. Sinu keeleoskuse taseme juures peab vaikselt juba hakkama sellistele asjadele tähelepanu pöörama :)

Henrik


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