Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

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Linguaphile
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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-09-09, 14:51

läbi lillede rääkima to speak in euphemisms, use veiled language, mince words (lit. "to speak through flowers")

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-09-19, 23:53

kopp ees / siiber:
mul on kopp ees = kopp on ees = I hate it, I'm sick of it, I'm tired of it
mul on sellest kopp ees = I'm sick of this
mul on siiber = I'm fed up, I'm tired of it
mul on neist siiber = I'm fed up with them
mul on siiber sellest kõigest = I've had it with all of this

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-09-22, 23:08

ilmeksimatult infallibly
vaaritama to prepare food
vajakajäämine shortcoming, drawback

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-09-23, 23:35

mullikile bubble wrap
rasvakriit crayon

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-09-27, 18:17

häält sisse ajama to start a motor, to play an instrument
kõõluma to lean on something, to sway back and forth while supported by something, to swing on something, to dangle; (also: to hang around without working)
ülbitsema to speak in an arrogant, bullying way

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-10-02, 0:32

Not really "words", but just notes for myself. This seems as good a place to put it as any.

taas vanadesse rööbastesse tagasi pöörduma to return to one's old ways again
normaalsetesse rööbastesse naasma to return to normal

peeglitest peeglite peegelduste peegeldusi nägema to see the mirrors' reflections' reflections in the mirror
Context: several mirrors opposite each other.

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-10-18, 4:42

omaalgatuslik unprompted; of one's own accord
poolalateadvuslikult half-unconsciously

Also after some confusion reading about the author Friedebert Tuglas and initially thinking "wow, I had no idea the genitive form of Tuglas was Tukla, how strange, I would have thought Tuglase" it seems that Tukla is actually the genitive of Tukkel, a nickname of his.

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-10-25, 18:14

rehmama to hit or strike with the hand or to make a striking motion; to say in a sudden or nonchalant, vague way :?: (EKSS: millegi peale käega lööma, heitma; millegi muuga löömisliigutust tegema, lööma; midagi järsku v. hooletult ütlema; ühmama; ÕS: käega lööma v heitma)

metsasiht straight, cleared area in a forest, such as to mark a boundary or allow the passage of power lines :?: (EKSS: kvartaleid eraldav sirge siht metsas; Saagpaku sõnaraamatu järgi on see hoopis millegipärast inglise keeles "ride")

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-12-02, 1:22

So I somehow managed to encounter in a book the word "eimillekskipidav", which gets all of zero google hits. With a space ("eimillekski pidav") it gets a single lonely google hit and as three words ("ei millekski pidav") also just one.

Would it mean "considering to be worthless" or "not taking into account", i.e seeing something as if the thing in question is irrelevant?

"Mitte millekski pidav" is more successful with 65 google hits, very few but seems like a lot by comparison. :mrgreen: It even gets one hit as a single word ("mittemillekskipidav").

"Mitte millekski pidama" gets a genuine EKSS entry: "[midagi, kedagi] mitte millekski ~ mikski ~ miskiks panema ~ pidama: millelegi, hrv. kellelegi) tähelepanu mitte pöörama, (midagi) mitte tähele panema, seda mitte arvestama. Ta ei pannud minu arvamust ja nõuandeid millekski, miskiks. Ega rikas pea vaesemaid naabreid mikski, miskiks. *Pärismaalased ei pidanud kingitusi mikski ja ähvardasid endiselt. H. Treimann (tlk)."

But the best part is that "eimillekski pidamine" actually has its own entry in the Nastik Estonian-English dictionary. The English translation is... wait for it.... floccinaucinihilipilification! I had to look that up too. Oxford says it is "the action or habit of estimating something as worthless" and adds that "the word is used chiefly as a curiosity."

So how does eimillekskipidav sound in Estonian? An error, a curiosity or (as a v-participle derived from a variation of [midagi, kedagi] mitte millekski ~ mikski ~ miskiks panema ~ pidama) simply not all that surprising?

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Naava » 2020-12-02, 8:51

Linguaphile wrote: The English translation is... wait for it.... floccinaucinihilipilification! I had to look that up too.

I lost it at hilipili... 😂😂

I can't say anything about Estonian, but Finnish has a similar phrase pitää ei-minään or ei pitää minään.

The meaning seems to be the same or at least similar to mitte milleks pidama: to think something or someone is unimportant, not worth of anything, nothing (both as in "you're nothing" and "it's fine, it's nothing!"). It's usually negative and belittling, but I think that if you're talking about a situation you're in, it could also be more like "I'm not bothered by it, I don't mind it".

I don't think I've ever heard anyone using ei-minään-pitävä though. My best guess is that it'd be a person who often thinks other people, things etc are not important or interesting enough to pay attention to or who isn't bothered by anything. :noclue: ei-minään-pidettävä would sound more natural, and that even gives me one hit on Google.

I doubt this helps you at all, but I thought it's interesting we have a similar phrase in both languages. :D

//edit: imo this is just one example of the phrase pitää jonakin, to regard as, to consider something as, to find something to be something. Eg pidän sinua kauniina = I think you are beautiful [always, not just now or in this dress etc]. Does Estonian have this phrase too?

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-12-02, 15:29

Naava wrote:
Linguaphile wrote: The English translation is... wait for it.... floccinaucinihilipilification! I had to look that up too.

I lost it at hilipili... 😂😂
[
flocci-nauci-nihili-pili-fication 😂

Naava wrote:I don't think I've ever heard anyone using ei-minään-pitävä though. My best guess is that it'd be a person who often thinks other people, things etc are not important or interesting enough to pay attention to or who isn't bothered by anything. ;

Where I encountered it, eimillekskipidav was used exactly like that, in the context of migratory birds who cross international borders. To people the borders are sometimes difficult to cross and impossible to ignore; to the birds, they are insignificant and not taken into consideration at all. The birds were described as eimillekskipidavad rändurid.

Naava wrote:I doubt this helps you at all, but I thought it's interesting we have a similar phrase in both languages. :D

Yes, it is! Thanks!

Naava wrote://edit: imo this is just one example of the phrase pitää jonakin, to regard as, to consider something as, to find something to be something. Eg pidän sinua kauniina = I think you are beautiful [always, not just now or in this dress etc]. Does Estonian have this phrase too?

Yes, that's one of the many uses of millekski pidama. There's kalliks pidama = to be fond of, hold dear; sobivaks pidama = to see fit; enesestmõistetavaks pidama = to take for granted; tühiseks pidama = to derogate; jumalaks pidama = to worship. *
When not used with the translative case it has other meanings: vastu pidama = to endure; sõna pidama = to keep one's word; lugu pidama = to respect; pidu pidama = to have a party; vahti pidama = to keep guard; sammu pidama = to keep up with, and so on....
Of course in part that is because of the many different meanings of pidama. EKSS has two separate entries for pidama, the first with 10 definitions and the second with 17, with a note at the beginning of the second entry stating "üleminekud tähenduste vahel sageli ebaselged". :mrgreen:

*That's why I wondered if eimillekskipidav might seem unsurprising, but it doesn't seem common to use them as adjectives/participles like this. Jumalaks pidav gets only 75 google hits, jumalakspidav gets none. Tühiseks pidav gets 4, tühisekspidav none. And so on. The non-translative ones are much ore common: vastupidav gets 3,680,000 google hits, lugupidav gets 132,000 hits, sõnapidav gets 45,200 hits, sammupidav gets 24,000. But you can't do this with just any word; pidupidav or peopidav isn't used :mrgreen: (and vahtipidav gets only 43 google hits) and so on.

New word:
põllusiil strip of farmland (I was so disappointed that it has nothing to do with hedgehogs.....)

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby ainurakne » 2020-12-02, 18:51

Linguaphile wrote:So how does eimillekskipidav sound in Estonian? An error, a curiosity or (as a v-participle derived from a variation of [midagi, kedagi] mitte millekski ~ mikski ~ miskiks panema ~ pidama) simply not all that surprising?
Not surprising at all.

Linguaphile wrote:põllusiil strip of farmland (I was so disappointed that it has nothing to do with hedgehogs.....)
Yeah, well, one is siilu, the other is siili.

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-12-03, 2:40

ainurakne wrote:Image

Nice! :lol:

Some new words again (thanks):
Torusiil a brand name of drain cleaner
torupuhastusvahend drain cleaner
piibuhari pipe cleaner (for the other kind of pipe of course, or nowadays for art projects, but I presume it's the reason torupuhastusvahend doesn't translate as "pipe cleaner" in English even though it is used for cleaning pipes!)

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Prantsis » 2020-12-03, 5:26

I don't have much to add about those nihilist birds. To me the word eimillekskipidav looks similar to pahakspanev or heakskiitev...

Linguaphile wrote:rehmama [...]; to say in a sudden or nonchalant, vague way :?: (EKSS: [...]; midagi järsku v. hooletult ütlema; ühmama

It probably won't make a big difference but here's how I would translate:
to say in a sudden abrupt/brusque or nonchalant careless(?), vague/indistinct manner
(I don't think hooletult has nonchalant's connotations here, I just understand that no care is put into the saying)
I've also found French translations for ühmama, they're along the lines of "to grumble" and "to mutter".

Linguaphile wrote:metsasiht straight, cleared area in a forest, such as to mark a boundary or allow the passage of power lines :?:

Some explanations here:
https://loodusegakoos.ee/puuri-uuri/metsanduse-ajalugu/metsakorralduse-algus


And a new word:

katuseraha (lit. "roof money") state grants for members of parliament to award as they see fit. (I couldn´t find a more concise term. The French version was called "parliamentary reserve" and was ended three years ago.)

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby ainurakne » 2020-12-03, 16:03

Linguaphile wrote:Torusiil a brand name of drain cleaner
I think torusiil is nowadays used as an umbrella term for all kinds of drain cleaners.

It could have originally referred to a kind of a round metal brush on a long stick or a wire, that could be inserted into pipes. But don't quote me on that.

Linguaphile wrote:torupuhastusvahend drain cleaner
piibuhari pipe cleaner (for the other kind of pipe of course, or nowadays for art projects, but I presume it's the reason torupuhastusvahend doesn't translate as "pipe cleaner" in English even though it is used for cleaning pipes!)
Or torupuhasti as a more general term.

In case of a brush for pipes, it's torupuhastushari or just toruhari.

Prantsis wrote:katuseraha (lit. "roof money") state grants for members of parliament to award as they see fit. (I couldn´t find a more concise term. The French version was called "parliamentary reserve" and was ended three years ago.)
This term has always confused me, because "katust" maksma means to pay to protection racketeers.
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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-12-03, 17:48

ainurakne wrote:
Prantsis wrote:katuseraha (lit. "roof money") state grants for members of parliament to award as they see fit. (I couldn´t find a more concise term. The French version was called "parliamentary reserve" and was ended three years ago.)
This term has always confused me, because "katust" maksma means to pay to protection racketeers.

I am so glad you brought that up because that's exactly what I thought when I saw Prantsis's post (and I didn't know the parliamentary meaning). I have no idea why I even knew the meaning of katust maksma and when I searched yesterday to verify it, I couldn't find it (because I was thinking it was kellel katust olla or something like that and that's what I looked for - maybe it is used that way too? Anyway I was definitely thinking of the same kind of usage, basically protection money paid in relation to organized crime, or something like that, But I couldn't find it so I was doubting whether "katus" really does have that meaning in Estonian and thinking maybe it was some other language's phrase for have/pay 'roof'' that might have been thinking of instead. I didn't even want to ask about it here because I was doubting myself so much and seriously I don't even know where I would have learned it from, which made me doubt it even more. :shock: So thanks for bringing it up, I would have just kept wondering! :silly:
I guess both meanings are meant as a sort of "cover," one protects people (sort of) like a roof over their heads and the other covers whatever the parliamentarians want it to cover, if I've understood correctly.

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby ainurakne » 2020-12-03, 18:47

Linguaphile wrote:I have no idea why I even knew the meaning of katust maksma and when I searched yesterday to verify it, I couldn't find it (because I was thinking it was kellel katust olla or something like that and that's what I looked for - maybe it is used that way too?
Maybe you mean [kellelegi] katust pakkuma (to provide or offer protection to someone)?

Linguaphile wrote:I guess both meanings are meant as a sort of "cover," one protects people (sort of) like a roof over their heads and the other covers whatever the parliamentarians want it to cover, if I've understood correctly.
The 'roof' or 'cover' sounds indeed logical in relation to organized crime, but katuseraha makes me scratch the back of my head.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ww7sA7yrUtc
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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-12-03, 20:58

ainurakne wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:I have no idea why I even knew the meaning of katust maksma and when I searched yesterday to verify it, I couldn't find it (because I was thinking it was kellel katust olla or something like that and that's what I looked for - maybe it is used that way too?
Maybe you mean [kellelegi] katust pakkuma (to provide or offer protection to someone)?

Yes, it may well have been. I was thinking I might have come across it (in a book or online) in the context of someone asking someone else something like "kas sul on katus?" and the person who was asked didn't know what they were referring to so it was explained, with the meaning you mentioned earlier. Or something vaguely along those lines. Would that phrasing make sense? I don't even remember where I would have come across it so the chances that I don't remember it correctly are very high. Besides I didn't expect to need to know it for real life (still don't :silly: ) so I don't think I really dedicated memory cells to it. I'm actually happy with myself for having remembered that the word katus had something to do with illegal dealings and protection, never mind the specifics. :silly:
By the way I'm not responding to the video because I'm unable to watch it on this device, I will watch it later!

ainurakne wrote:
Linguaphile wrote:I have no idea why I even knew the meaning of katust maksma and when I searched yesterday to verify it, I couldn't find it (because I was thinking it was kellel katust olla or something like that and that's what I looked for - maybe it is used that way too?
Maybe you mean [kellelegi] katust pakkuma (to provide or offer protection to someone)?

Yes, it may well have been. I was thinking I might have come across it (in a book or online) in the context of someone asking someone else something like "kas sul on katus?" and the person who was asked didn't know what they were referring to so it was explained, with the meaning you mentioned earlier. Or something vaguely along those lines. Would that phrasing make sense? I don't even remember where I would have come across it so the chances that I don't remember it correctly are very high. Besides I didn't expect to need to know it for real life (still don't :silly: ) so I don't think I really dedicated memory cells to it. I'm actually happy with myself for having remembered that the word katus had something to do with illegal dealings and protection, never mind the specifics. :silly:


—Me tulime teile katust pakkuma!
—Mul on juba väga hea Leedu eterniitkatus.
.
Jah... täpselt! :D

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-12-07, 5:35

So thanks to Prantsis's links I started watching the series Osoon, the first episode (or at least the first part of it) is about birdwatching, so....
linnuvaatleja birdwatcher
bongar chaser of rare birds, twitcher (I didn't even know this in English)
linnumääraja birdfinder, bird book
linnumääramistunnus bird's identifying features/marks
riistapuu contraption, gizmo
suumokulaar ocular zoom
statiiv tripod
kuderänne spawning migration (about fish of course, not birds!)

Birds:
luitsnokk-part shoveler
rüüt plover
tilder sandpiper
kiivitaja lapwing, peewit

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Re: Sõnad, mida hiljuti õppisid

Postby Linguaphile » 2020-12-17, 1:34

kaugelviibija one who lives far from home
koondnimi collective name
suurekaustaline large-sized, large-format (of books)
väikesekaustaline small-sized, small-format (of books)

Linguaphile wrote:kadakasakslik genteel, prim, snobbish; (historical) Germanized Estonian (adj.)
Also came across this one today: kadakasaksastuma to become Germanized (pejorative)


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